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Specimens collected from multiple people can be combined into one batch to test for the coronavirus. A negative result would clear all the specimens. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Nati Harnik/AP

Pooling Coronavirus Tests Can Spare Scarce Supplies, But There's A Catch

Instead of running a coronavirus test on every specimen, a lab can combines multiple samples. If the batch is negative, then everyone is in the clear. A positive leads to a second round of testing.

Pooling Coronavirus Tests Can Spare Scarce Supplies, But There's A Catch

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Billy Smith counts rows in the knit structure of a mask to assure specifications for fit and sizing meet company standards. Nick Rubalcava/Bilio hide caption

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Nick Rubalcava/Bilio

Want To Create A Better Mask? It's Harder Than It Seams

Brothers Billy and Nick Smith have designed a reusable mask that's knit, not sewn. It's seamless, sustainable, and made from polyester, spandex, nylon, and an antimicrobial silver-coated yarn.

Want To Create A Better Mask? It's Harder Than It Seams

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It wasn't easy in early March to get a test in the U.S. confirming you had the coronavirus — scarce availability of tests meant patients had to meet strict criteria linked to a narrow set of symptoms and particular travel history. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Early Coronavirus Testing Restrictions Led To Some Big ER Bills

Kaiser Health News

People with COVID-19 symptoms in March and April were often billed for expensive scans and bloodwork because they didn't qualify back then for a confirmatory coronavirus test. Some are crying foul.

Students walk past the central main building on campus at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. Police Monday detained a prominent legal scholar at the university who has been critical of the Communist Party and President Xi Jinping. Mike Kemp/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Kemp/Corbis via Getty Images

Prominent Critic Of China's Leadership Detained In Beijing

Xu Zhangrun, a constitutional scholar outspoken in his criticism of President Xi Jinping and the ruling Communist Party, has been particularly vocal about the regime's handling of the coronavirus.

The historic Thurgood Marshal U.S. Courthouse building, right, in New York City. A judge is assessing a case there after prosecutors admitted missteps, although they said with no malice intended. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

Federal Prosecutors Discussed 'Burying' Evidence In Troubled New York Case

The government acknowledged problems with sharing evidence with the defense, but prosecutors argue the missteps were inadvertent, not malicious. A judge is assessing the matter.

If your plant is rootbound — where the roots have wrapped around the inside of the pot and are outgrowing it, it might be time to upgrade to a bigger pot. Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

Why Does My Plant Look Sad? 6 Tips For Raising Happy Houseplants

Eager to bring new plants home, but aren't sure where to start? This episode will get you started with the basics of houseplant care. Because anyone can become a green thumb with a little time and attention.

Why Does My Plant Look Sad? 6 Tips For Raising Happy Houseplants

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In this photograph shared by the Washington State Patrol, the vehicle that hit protesters sits dented and damaged. Police say they have arrested the driver, but they have not yet assigned a motive for the incident. Rick Johnson/Washington State Patrol/Twitter hide caption

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Rick Johnson/Washington State Patrol/Twitter

1 Killed, 1 Injured After Driver Strikes Protesters In Seattle

Police have the driver in custody, but no motive has been given. Videos on social media depict the vehicle apparently swerving into a group of protesters on a freeway this weekend.

The death of George Floyd in police custody on May 25 sparked protests and tributes in Minneapolis and across the country. All four officers involved were fired and now face criminal charges. Jim Mone/AP hide caption

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Jim Mone/AP

3rd Ex-Police Officer Charged In George Floyd's Death Released From Jail On Bond

With Tou Thao's release on Saturday, three of the four former officers involved in George Floyd's death are free on bond. All face criminal charges, and one remains in custody.

Georgia Tech, pictured in 2016, will be holding some in-person classes in the fall. Faculty are upset that face coverings will not be mandatory. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

'A Nightmare': Georgia Tech Faculty Push Back Against In-Person Reopening Plans

The University System of Georgia is holding in-person classes this fall, with no masks required. It's an anomaly among top public universities — and it will put people at risk, professors say.

Though Black Americans make up 13% of the U.S. population, they represent only 5% of physicians. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The Importance Of Black Doctors

Though Black Americans make up 13% of the U.S. population, they represent only 5% of physicians. How does that lack of diversity affect Black patients?

The Importance Of Black Doctors

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Remains of the Christopher Columbus statue near Little Italy in Baltimore after it was ripped from its pedestal by protesters on July 4, 2020. Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

Baltimore Protesters Topple Columbus Statue

Demonstrators in Baltimore pulled down the statue and threw it into the harbor, adding it to the growing list of Columbus monuments toppled nationwide in response to his controversial legacy.

Cars on the Southern State Parkway in Nassau County, circa 1960. The urban planner Robert Moses, according to biographers, designed the road so that bridges were low enough to keep buses — which would likely be carrying poor minorities — from passing underneath on the route from New York City to Long Island's beaches. Pictorial Parade/Getty Images hide caption

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Pictorial Parade/Getty Images

'The Wrong Complexion For Protection.' How Race Shaped America's Roadways And Cities

An expert in urban planning and environmental policy explains how race has played a central role in how cities across America developed — often in ways that hurt minority communities.

'The Wrong Complexion For Protection.' How Race Shaped America's Roadways And Cities

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