NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts NPR delivers breaking national and world news. Also top stories from business, politics, health, science, technology, music, arts and culture. Subscribe to podcasts and RSS feeds.

Protesters gather outside the Supreme Court in Washington where the Court on Oct. 8, 2019, as the court heard arguments in the first case of LGBT rights since the retirement of Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Susan Walsh/AP

House To Vote On Equality Act: Here's What The Law Would Do

The House is set to vote on the Equality Act, which would add and expand protections for LGBTQ people in the Civil Rights Act. Here's what it would do and why it's controversial.

A vehicle rests on its side after a rollover accident involving golfer Tiger Woods along a road in the Rancho Palos Verdes section of Los Angeles on Tuesday. Woods suffered leg injuries in the one-car accident and was undergoing surgery, authorities and his agent said. Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP

Tiger Woods 'Awake, Responsive' After Undergoing Surgery For Rollover Crash

The legendary golfer suffered "multiple leg injuries," according to his agent. The sheriff's department said Woods was driving the only car involved in the collision.

Presiding judge Anne Kerber (left) stands before handing the verdict to Syrian defendant Eyad al-Gharib (right, face hidden under a folder) Wednesday in Koblenz. Gharib, 44, a former Syrian intelligence service agent, was sentenced to 4 1/2 years in jail for complicity in crimes against humanity in the first court case over state-sponsored torture by the Syrian government. Thomas Lohnes/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Thomas Lohnes/AFP via Getty Images

Landmark Verdict In Germany Sentences Syrian For Aiding Crimes Against Humanity

Eyad al-Gharib was convicted for sending protesters to a prison where they were tortured, in the first criminal trial against Syrians who served in President Bashar Assad's government.

Top left: An officer asks people to observe lockdown rules in Brighton, England. Bottom left: A protester at a lockdown demonstration in Brussels, Belgium last month. Top right: Malaysian health officers screen passengers with a thermal scanner at Kuala Lumpur Airport in January 2020. Bottom right: Employees eat their lunch in Wuhan, China, in March 2020. Luke Dray/Getty Images; Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP via Getty Images; Mohd Rasfan / AFP; Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Luke Dray/Getty Images; Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP via Getty Images; Mohd Rasfan / AFP; Getty Images

Why 'Tight' Cultures May Fare Better Than 'Loose' Cultures In A Pandemic

A new study in The Lancet Planetary Health finds that cultural attitudes may explain the stark differences in how countries experience the pandemic.

Visitors walk past the giant word "Data" during the Guiyang International Big Data Expo 2016 in southwestern China. China says it's determined to be a leader in using artificial intelligence to sort through big data. U.S. officials say the Chinese efforts include the collection of hundreds of millions of records on U.S. citizens. The photo was released by China's Xinhua News Agency. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

China Wants Your Data — And May Already Have It

When COVID hit, a Chinese firm offered to set up testing labs in the U.S., which could have given it access to DNA data. The U.S. says this is part of China's effort to collect mass data on Americans.

A medical worker gives a coronavirus vaccine shot to a patient at a vaccination facility in Beijing, in January. Two pharmaceutical companies in China announced Wednesday they are seeking market approval for new vaccines. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Chinese Pharmaceutical Makers Seek Approval For New Coronavirus Vaccines

If approved, the new vaccine candidates would give China a total of four OK'd for general distribution. Even so, the country's vaccine drive appears to be falling short.

Penguin Random House

A Botched Execution Leads To A Search For Answers In 'Two Truths And A Lie'

Fresh Air

Ellen McGarrahan was a young reporter for The Miami Herald, when she witnessed an execution that went horribly wrong. She revisits the case of Jesse Tafero in an intense new true crime book.

A Botched Execution Leads To A Search For Answers In 'Two Truths And A Lie'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/970893354/970999082" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A U.S. federal courtroom sits empty in 2017 in Honolulu. A new study finds that judges with backgrounds as prosecutors or corporate lawyers are more likely to rule in favor of employers. Jennifer Sinco Kelleher/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jennifer Sinco Kelleher/AP

Corporate Lawyers Who Become Judges Less Likely To Side With Workers, Study Says

A new study of diversity on the bench reports that judges who worked as prosecutors and corporate attorneys are significantly more likely to rule in favor of employers in workplace disputes.

Dr. Rochelle Walensky likens the call she got from the Biden team, asking her to lead the CDC amid a pandemic, to a hospital alarm that goes off when a patient's heart has stopped. "I got called during a code," she says. "And when you get called during a code, your job is to be there to help." Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Susan Walsh/AP

Biden's Straight-Talking CDC Director Has Long Used Data To Save Lives

WBUR

Dr. Rochelle Walensky says scientists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were "muzzled" and "diminished" by the Trump team, especially during the pandemic. She aims to fix that.

Biden's Straight-Talking CDC Director Has Long Used Data To Save Lives

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/970529519/970846502" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Five out-of-state members of a major Texas electricity grid operator are resigning following winter storm Uri that hit the state and knocked out coal, natural gas and nuclear plants that were unprepared for the freezing temperatures brought on by the storm. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Board Members Resign From Texas Electric Grid Operator After Mass Power Outages

The Electric Reliability Council of Texas has been heavily criticized after last week's winter storm left more than 4 million Texans without power for several days.

Aniya's overnight shift at an Amazon warehouse became impractical when daycare and school were canceled for her two children because of the pandemic. She was able to avoid eviction with the help of a lawyer and emergency rental assistance but she recently received a letter saying that her lease would not be renewed and she had to vacate the apartment. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Pam Fessler/NPR

For Black Families, Evictions Are Still At A Crisis Point — Despite Moratorium

"Black individuals make up about 21% of all renters, but they make up 35% of all defendants on eviction cases," says Peter Hepburn, a researcher for Princeton University's Eviction Lab.

For Black Families, Evictions Are Still At A Crisis Point — Despite Moratorium

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/970190910/970846496" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Children attend online classes at the Crenshaw Family YMCA in Los Angeles. Schools are having a hard time covering the costs required for in-person and online learning during the pandemic. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Not All COVID-19 Aid Is Spent. But Schools, Cities And States Say They Need More

Republicans in Congress question whether schools, cities and states really need as much relief as President Biden and Democrats want to give them. At the local level, people say they're desperate.

Rosamund Pike stars in the new Netflix film I Care A Lot. Seacia Pavao/Netflix hide caption

toggle caption
Seacia Pavao/Netflix

You May Or May Not Care For 'I Care A Lot'

In the new Netflix comedy-thriller, Rosamund Pike plays a grifter who tricks her way into becoming the legal guardian of elderly people, then drains their bank accounts. It's a well-oiled scheme, until she chooses a woman with a dangerous background as her new target.

You May Or May Not Care For 'I Care A Lot'

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/970512063/970549813" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Amy Sherald, who painted the official portrait of Michelle Obama, appeared in the film Black Art: In the Absence of Light. HBO hide caption

toggle caption
HBO

'Black Art' Chronicles A Pivotal Exhibition And Its Lasting Impact On Black Artists

A 1976 exhibit of art created by African Americans was the first major show by a Black curator and serves as a starting point for the HBO documentary Black Art: In the Absence of Light.

'Black Art' Chronicles A Pivotal Exhibition And Its Lasting Impact On Black Artists

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/970546036/970765560" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Courtesy of Andrew Crivilare

Rita Sekirka, 89: Judy Garland's 'Easter Parade'

NPR is remembering some of those who lost their lives to the pandemic by listening to the music they loved. Rita Sekirka's grandson says they used to belt out "Easter Parade" together in her nursing home.

Rita Sekirka, 89: Judy Garland's 'Easter Parade'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/969577935/970846520" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The magnets used in these letters are one of the more obvious uses of magnets, but magnets are also found in many other household objects. Fred Tanneau/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Fred Tanneau/AFP via Getty Images

Magnets: The Hidden Objects Powering Your Life

Magnets are hidden everywhere — in cars, phones, computers, televisions — not to mention the fact that earth is basically a giant magnet. NPR science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel explains why magnets deserve more respect.

Magnets: The Hidden Objects Powering Your Life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/970411879/970725069" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

WATCH

MORE VIDEOS

TDC video carousel

New and exclusive videos from the popular concert series.

more from