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Zoom is wildly popular, but it's now under scrutiny for security and privacy issues. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

A Must For Millions, Zoom Has A Dark Side — And An FBI Warning

Federal and state law enforcement are asking questions about Zoom's security and privacy policies, as millions flock to the videoconferencing service for meetings, classes and social gatherings.

A Must For Millions, Zoom Has A Dark Side — And An FBI Warning

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U.S. Lost 701,000 Jobs In March; Much Worse To Come

For the first time in nearly a decade, the economy suffered a net loss of jobs as the coronavirus began to take hold in the country. The unemployment rate shot up to 4.4%.

U.S. Lost 701,000 Jobs In March; Much Worse To Come

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U.S. Navy Captain Brett E. Crozier, the commander of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt, was relieved of his command on Friday after he complained in a letter about the Navy's response to a shipboard outbreak of coronavirus. U.S. Navy hide caption

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U.S. Navy

USS Roosevelt Commander Removed After Criticizing Handling Of Coronavirus Outbreak

Capt. Brett Crozier was relieved of his command of the USS Theodore Roosevelt aircraft carrier after a highly critical letter he wrote to his superiors went public.

Medical staff move bodies from the Wyckoff Heights Medical Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., Thursday to a refrigerated truck. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

FACT CHECK: Money-To-Hospitals Plan To Treat Coronavirus Patients Could Face Problems

Instead of reopening health care exchanges for those who don't qualify for Medicaid and don't have employer-based insurance, Trump is proposing paying hospitals directly. But it might not be enough.

David Bramante, the owner of West Newton Theatre in Newton, Mass., stands in the doorway of the theater noting its closure on March 27, 2020. Boston Globe/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Boston Globe/Boston Globe via Getty Images

The Coronavirus Small Business Loan Program: What You Need To Know

Congress has made $349 billion available in loans to small businesses, much of which may be forgivable. Here's what to know about how this might work for your small business.

Two days before Christine Rayburn was scheduled to have a cancerous tumor removed, the hospital cancelled the surgery, part of a wave of cancellations of "elective" surgeries during the coronavirus pandemic. But Rayburn's surgeon fought back, and got the surgery back on the schedule 10 days later. Poppi Photography hide caption

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Poppi Photography

As Coronavirus Strains Hospitals, Cancer Patients Face Treatment Delays, Uncertainty

As hospitals are forced to delay or cancel certain medical procedures so they can focus resources on treatment of COVID-19, it's disrupting ongoing care for people with other serious illnesses.

As Coronavirus Strains Hospitals, Cancer Patients Face Treatment Delays, Uncertainty

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Former Democratic presidential candidate Mike Bloomberg announced that he was suspending his campaign in March. His former staffers say they were promised jobs through the general election, even if he was not the nominee. Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AP hide caption

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Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AP

'Mike Borrowed My Credibility And Abused It': Fired Bloomberg Campaign Workers Speak

Mike Bloomberg's presidential bid didn't last long, but he promised staffers jobs through November. Now some who were abruptly laid off during a pandemic are detailing how they say they were misled.

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice delivers his annual State of the State address at the state Capitol in Charleston, W.Va., in January. Justice and his family own coal mining companies that have agreed to pay the government more than $5 million in delinquent mine safety fines, the Justice Department says. Chris Jackson/AP hide caption

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Chris Jackson/AP

Companies Tied To W.Va. Governor To Pay $5 Million In Mining Violations

Coal mining companies linked to billionaire Gov. Jim Justice and his family have agreed to pay the government more than $5 million in delinquent mine safety fines.

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