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Luisa Schaeffer scrolls through her COVID-19 isolation case list for the day: One woman is out of milk, while another needs help finding a doctor and making an appointment. A man asks about help paying his rent. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Contact Tracers In Massachusetts Order Milk And Help With Rent. Here's Why

WBUR

The state offers support and resources for people isolating because of COVID-19 — helping them make choices that keep everyone safe. It's work more states need to fund, experts say.

Seattle Police Chief Carmen Best said she is retiring from the department next month. She's seen here speaking at a prayer vigil at the First AME Church in Seattle in June, following protests over the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis in May. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Seattle's Police Chief Resigns After Council Votes To Cut Department Funds

Carmen Best, the city's first Black police chief, will leave after a tumultuous few months in Seattle, where protesters against racial injustice took over several blocks.

U.S. Census Bureau worker Marisela Gonzales stands by a display of books and flyers about the 2020 census at a walk-up counting site in Greenville, Texas, in July. The bureau's employees are under a time crunch to try to complete the national head count after the agency announced that counting will end a month early. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

'Not Enough Time': Census Workers Fear Rushing Count Could Botch Results

Already hampered by the coronavirus, Census Bureau workers are now scrambling to visit households that haven't filled out a 2020 census form, trying to finish a count that's been cut short by a month.

Demonstrators block roads to protest the postponement of presidential elections in El Alto, Bolivia. Gaston Brito/Getty Images hide caption

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Gaston Brito/Getty Images

'We Can't Stand It Anymore': Bolivian Protesters Demand Quick Elections

"Many of us know the risk [voting] entails because of the pandemic," a protester says, "but we want to hold elections." The vote, postponed twice due to the virus, is now set to take place on Oct. 18.

'We Can't Stand It Anymore': Bolivian Protesters Demand Quick Elections

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Clark County Commission Vice Chairman Lawrence Weekly swabs his nose while giving a coronavirus test to himself during a tour of setup at a temporary coronavirus testing site in Las Vegas on Aug. 3. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Las Vegas Casinos Are Open At 50% Capacity. What About Las Vegas Hospitals?

Las Vegas is on shaky footing as it reopens with one of the nation's highest infection rates. An NPR analysis shows the city could run into trouble with hospital capacity if cases keep climbing.

Las Vegas Casinos Are Open At 50% Capacity. What About Las Vegas Hospitals?

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New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, seen here in May, said Tuesday that the country had four new cases of COVID-19. The government moved quickly to contain the outbreak and increased alert levels throughout the country. Hagen Hopkins/AP hide caption

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Hagen Hopkins/AP

New Zealand On Alert After 4 Cases Of COVID-19 Emerge From An Unknown Source

The cases came after 102 days with no community spread. The four are members of the same family. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced a three-day period of high restrictions due to the new cluster.

Russian President Vladimir Putin chairs a meeting with members of the government via a teleconference call at the Novo-Ogaryovo state residence outside Moscow on Tuesday. He announced the approval of Russia's coronavirus vaccine during this meeting. Alexey Nikolsky/Sputnik/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alexey Nikolsky/Sputnik/AFP via Getty Images

Skepticism Greets Putin's Announcement Of Russian Coronavirus Vaccine

It's the first country to approve a COVID-19 vaccine, but it has not finished Phase III trials to assess safety and effectiveness in the general population.

President Trump speaks at a rally in Manchester, N.H., on Feb. 10, 2020. "I've never heard any Republican office-holder speak of President Trump as if he should be president," says GOP strategist Stuart Stevens. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Veteran GOP Strategist Takes On Trump — And His Party — In 'It Was All A Lie'

Fresh Air

Political consultant Stuart Stevens says the Republican party's support for Trump reflects the abandonment of principles it claimed to embrace, such as fiscal restraint and personal responsibility.

A voter inserts a ballot in a drive-up drop box last week in Renton, Wash., in that state's primary. With more states expanding absentee voting due to the pandemic, the use of drop boxes is growing and leading to legal challenges from some Republicans. Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

Ballot Drop Boxes Become Latest Front In Voting Legal Fights

Drop boxes have been used in some states for years, and their use is expanding as more voters cast absentee ballots. But the Trump campaign and some Republicans say they're not secure enough.

Stock trading has become easier and cheaper than ever. But have venues like Robinhood made it too risky for inexperienced investors? Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Millions Turn To Stock Trading During Pandemic, But Some See Trouble For The Young

Stock trading has become easier and cheaper than ever. And people stuck at home during the pandemic have flocked to it. But have venues like Robinhood made it too risky for inexperienced investors?

Millions Turn To Stock Trading During Pandemic, But Some See Trouble For The Young

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Martín Elfman for NPR

The Most Important Mail You'll Ever Send: A Ballot

If you're planning on voting this fall — which you should be — you can probably mail in your ballot instead of voting in person. Here's how to do that.

The Most Important Mail You'll Ever Send: A Ballot

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