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A U.S. Capitol Police officer holds a program as Brian Sicknick lays in honor in the Capitol Rotunda on Feb. 3. A medical examiner has determined that Officer Sicknick died of natural causes following the Jan. 6 insurrection. Demetrius Freeman/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Demetrius Freeman/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick Died Of Natural Causes, Medical Examiner Rules

Sicknick, who engaged with pro-Trump rioters during the Jan. 6 insurrection, died after suffering strokes, Washington, D.C.'s chief medical examiner says.

Hundreds of demonstrators attended a Sunday rally for Black and Asian solidarity at George Floyd Square in Minneapolis ahead of a possible verdict in the trial of Derek Chauvin this week. Evan Frost/MPR News hide caption

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Evan Frost/MPR News

In Minneapolis, Residents And Law Enforcement Alike Brace For Chauvin Trial Verdict

With the National Guard on patrol and barbed wire fences lining downtown, residents say they feel anxious ahead of a verdict, which could come this week.

A National Guard soldier stands on an outside balcony at the Hennepin County Government Center last week in Minneapolis where the trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin for the death of George Floyd continues. Jim Mone/AP hide caption

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Jim Mone/AP

Reporter's Notebook: Impressions Of A City As Derek Chauvin's Trial Nears Its End

The nation's largest suburban shopping mall was filled with consumers, while National Guard troops stood guard in downtown Minneapolis. Making sense of the contrasting images is hard.

Sulma Franco, an organizer with Mujeres Luchadoras and Grassroots Leadership and an LGBT activist from Guatemala, leads protestors to the entrance of the T. Don Hutto Residential Center in Taylor, Texas on March 24 where U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement contracts for the detention of migrant women. Julia Robinson hide caption

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Julia Robinson

Immigrant Detention For Profit Faces Growing Resistance After Big Expansion Under Trump

A grassroots movement opposing privately-run immigrant jails across the country, which grew under former President Trump, has continued and found a more receptive audience under President Biden.

Climate activist Greta Thunberg, 18, is adding vaccine inequality to her agenda. In a speech on Monday, she said it was "unethical" to vaccinate young people in rich countries when health workers in low resource countries aren't yet inoculated. WHO/Screengrab by NPR hide caption

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WHO/Screengrab by NPR

Eco-Activist Greta Thunberg Has A New Issue: The Moral Threat of Vaccine Inequality

The 18-year-old gave her point of view at a World Health Organization press conference, saying it's "unethical" to vaccinate young people in wealthy countries ahead of health workers in poor places.

Proud Boy members Joseph Biggs (left) and Ethan Nordean, carrying a megaphone, walk toward the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. A federal judge ordered them detained pending trial given the conspiracy charges against them. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

2 Proud Boys Ordered Jailed Pending Trial In Capitol Riot Conspiracy Case

Ethan Nordean and Joseph Biggs had been released, but the government renewed its request to return them to custody after indicting them. A federal judge agreed, given the nature of the allegations.

Demonstrators attend a peace walk honoring the life 13-year-old Adam Toledo on April 18, 2021, in Chicago's Little Village neighborhood. Shafkat Anowar/AP hide caption

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Shafkat Anowar/AP

Attorney For Adam Toledo's Family: 'Adam Died Because He Complied'

The attorney for the family of the 13-year-old Chicago boy shot in an alley by police said he didn't need to die. "Adam may still be alive today had the officer given him the opportunity to comply."

Attorney For Adam Toledo's Family: 'Adam Died Because He Complied'

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Families are reunited as travelers arrive on the first flight from Sydney in Wellington on Monday after Australia and New Zealand opened a trans-Tasman quarantine-free travel bubble. Marty Melville/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Marty Melville/AFP via Getty Images

Joy, Relief In Airports As Australia And New Zealand Open 'Travel Bubble'

Families and friends met in airports for the first time in over a year after Australia and New Zealand opened a "bubble" of quarantine-free travel between their countries.

Joy, Relief In Airports As Australia And New Zealand Open 'Travel Bubble'

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Lisa Przekop, director of admissions at University of California, Santa Barbara, says that many high schoolers this year wrote their application essays about depression and anxiety during the pandemic. Patricia Marroquin/Moment Editorial/Getty Images hide caption

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Patricia Marroquin/Moment Editorial/Getty Images

How The Pandemic Changed The College Admissions Selection Process This Year

Colleges around the country faced an admissions season marked by pandemic-era challenges: dropped testing requirements, remote learning, disrupted extracurriculars and record applicant pools.

How The Pandemic Changed The College Admissions Selection Process This Year

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Humpback whales, working in teams, circle herring with disorienting curtains of bubbles off Alaska's coast, then shoot up from below with their mouths open. This innovation developed among unrelated groups of humpbacks but is now a widely adopted practice. Brian Skerry/National Geographic hide caption

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Brian Skerry/National Geographic

Photos: The Culture Of Whales

Belugas play, a sperm whale nurses, and orcas teach their pups to hunt in a series of photographs from National Geographic photographer and explorer Brian Skerry.

Photos: The Culture Of Whales

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Calling all poets — even and especially if you don't call yourself one. Use #NPRpoetry to send us your mini poems, and we'll feature some of your submissions each week of April. bortonia/Getty Images hide caption

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bortonia/Getty Images

You Sent Us Your Poems. Here Are The Ones That Resonated With Poets

'Tis the season to fill our feeds; need not rhyme nor reason for our poetry needs. Help NPR celebrate with your original poems on social media. Each week, we'll enlist poets to pick their favorites.

Ayanna Albertson

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