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"It's really exciting to see choreographers nowadays blurring the lines of gender binary and sexuality," says Ashton Edwards. Ashton Edwards hide caption

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Ashton Edwards

With A Leap Across Gender Norms, A Rising Ballet Star Looks To Rewrite Rules Of Dance

Ballet student Ashton Edwards is the rare dancer who is expanding his repertoire and his craft by training to dance in en pointe shoes, once worn only by women.

With A Leap Across Gender Norms, A Rising Ballet Star Looks To Rewrite Rules Of Dance

Audio will be available later today.

A U.S. flag flies outside the Capitol building in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 7. Graeme Sloan/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Graeme Sloan/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Opinion: The Fringe Of America's Fabric

NPR's Scott Simon reflects on the upcoming presidential inauguration of Joe Biden in the wake of last week's deadly assault on the U.S. Capitol.

Opinion: The Fringe Of America's Fabric

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Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, will leave his post next week after heading the federal public health agency during a pandemic that, he said, has yet to see its darkest days. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Outgoing CDC Director Warns Of Pandemic's Peak: 'We're About To Be In The Worst Of It'

A year into the COVID-19 crisis, Dr. Robert Redfield stands by his federal health agency's response to the pandemic despite an early "learning curve" and contradictory messaging from President Trump.

Outgoing CDC Director Warns Of Pandemic's Peak: 'We're About To Be In The Worst Of It'

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Capitol police officers inside the building on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. The protesters stormed the historic building, breaking windows and clashing with police. Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images

January 6: Inside the Capitol Siege

You may have seen fragments of footage from the siege on the Capitol. Now, hear from those who lived it.

January 6: Inside the Capitol Siege

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The FBI informed the Defense Department of 68 current and former military members who were investigated in domestic extremism probes in 2020, according to a senior defense official. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Defense Official: Scores Of Current And Former Military Probed In Extremism Cases

The source says the Pentagon was informed about 68 subjects in FBI domestic extremism investigations in 2020. The vast majority are former military; many with unfavorable discharge records.

A medical worker inoculates a colleague with a COVID-19 vaccine at the Nil Ratan Sircar Medical College and Hospital in Kolkata on Saturday. Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP via Getty Images

India Kicks Off A Massive COVID-19 Vaccination Drive

Cheers erupted in hospital wards across the country as a first group of nurses and sanitation workers rolled up their sleeves and got vaccinated. India aims to inoculate 300 million by July.

India Kicks Off A Massive COVID-19 Vaccination Drive

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National Rifle Association Annual Meeting 2019 in Indiana. The organization filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy Friday. In a statement the NRA said it aims to reincorporate as a nonprofit in Texas, leaving New York, where the state has filed a fraud suit against it. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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Michael Conroy/AP

NRA Files For Bankruptcy Amid Fraud Suit In New York

The NRA aims to relocate to Texas, away from the "corrupt political ... environment" of New York. The state's attorney general says officials diverted millions of dollars to their personal expenses.

When it comes to New Year's goal setting, mental health experts say 2021 is the year to try a calmer, gentler approach to health. Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop hide caption

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Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop

Broken New Year's Resolutions Already? It's OK to Give Yourself A Break

It's a trying time to be a human. Mental health experts say it's OK to give yourself a break on you new year's resolutions and offer advice for a kinder, gentler approach to goal-setting in 2021.

People lined up to receive the COVID-19 vaccine at a mass vaccination site in Disneyland's parking lot in Anaheim, Calif. on Jan. 13. The state says all residents 65 or older are now eligible to receive the vaccine. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

OPINION: Moral Tragedy Looms In Early Chaos Of U.S. COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution

As states suddenly expand the categories of people eligible for the first scarce shipments of vaccine, who will be watching to make sure those hit hardest by the pandemic aren't left behind?

A coronavirus variant that is thought to be more contagious was detected in the United States in Elbert County, Colo., not far from this testing site in Parker, Colo. The variant has been detected in several U.S. states. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

CDC Warns New U.K. Coronavirus Variant Is Spreading Fast In The U.S.

It appears to be 50% more infectious, and researchers predict the new coronavirus variant could start to dominate in the U.S. by March. The time to prepare is now, they say.

"People will not be subject to age or disability discrimination when the going gets tough," Roger Severino, the director of the Office of Civil Rights at the Department of Health and Human Services, told NPR. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

HHS Civil Rights Office Tackles Health Care Discrimination Of People With Disabilities

New actions from the Office For Civil Rights at the Department of Health and Human Services aim to fight discrimination against people with disabilities who have COVID-19, like being denied treatment.

A man works at an Amazon fulfillment center in Staten Island, New York. The retail giant faces a major labor battle with a unionization vote planned at a similar warehouse in Alabama. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Amazon Warehouse Workers To Decide Whether To Form Company's First U.S. Union

Although the company has unionized workers in Europe, it has held off organizing efforts here. About 6,000 workers at an Amazon facility in Alabama can cast a mail-in ballot starting Feb. 8.

Maria Laura Niz, from the San Martin Hospital, in La Plata, Argentina, was nervous about getting vaccinated. But she's more worried that without the vaccine the pandemic could get worse. Anita Pouchard Serra for NPR hide caption

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Anita Pouchard Serra for NPR

Argentina Takes A Shot With Russia's Sputnik Vaccine

The nation has been hard hit by the pandemic. The president vowed to start a vaccination campaign by the end of 2020. That did happen — but not exactly as they'd hoped.

Amazon cut off Parler from its Web hosting service, knocking the social media site offline. Hollie Adams/Getty Images hide caption

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Hollie Adams/Getty Images

Parler Executive Responds To Amazon Cutoff And Defends Approach To Moderation

Amazon took the social media platform Parler offline, saying Parler wasn't removing threats of violence. Parler Chief Policy Officer Amy Peikoff tells NPR the site's goal is freedom of speech.

Parler Executive Responds To Amazon Cutoff And Defends Approach To Moderation

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U.S. park rangers look at the spot where Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. gave his famous "I Have a Dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., on Friday. Security threats have prompted officials to shut down the National Mall and much of downtown Washington, D.C. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

'All Hands On Deck': National Mall Is Closed As Agencies Fortify D.C.

The National Park Service cites the "real and substantial threat of violence and unlawful behavior" at the upcoming inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden.

Vice President-elect Kamala Harris delivers remarks on Jan. 8 as President-elect Joe Biden looks on. The two are set to be inaugurated Wednesday at the U.S. Capitol. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

With Impeachment Trial And Relief Plan On Deck, Harris Stresses Need To 'Multitask'

The vice president-elect joins NPR to discuss the attack on the U.S. Capitol, the looming impeachment trial in the Senate and the massive rescue plan the president-elect just unveiled.

With Impeachment Trial And Relief Plan On Deck, Harris Stresses Need To 'Multitask'

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On April 3, 1968, Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., second from right, stands with other civil rights leaders on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn., a day before he was assassinated at approximately the same place. From left: Hosea Williams, Jesse Jackson, King and Ralph Abernathy. Charles Kelly/AP Photo hide caption

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Charles Kelly/AP Photo

'I May Not Get There With You': An Eyewitness Account Of MLK's Final Days

Clara Jean Ester was a college student in 1968 when she saw Martin Luther King Jr. give his final speech. A day later, Ester was at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn., when he was assassinated.

'I May Not Get There With You': An Eyewitness Account Of MLK's Final Days

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Apple cores are perfectly safe to eat, even though many choose not to. Cavan Images/Getty Images/Cavan Images RF hide caption

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Cavan Images/Getty Images/Cavan Images RF

Micro Wave: How 'Bout Dem Apple ... Seeds

Many folks eat an apple and then throw out the core. It turns out, the core is perfectly OK to eat — despite apple seeds' association with the poison cyanide.

Micro Wave: How 'Bout Dem Apple...Seeds

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Leslie Odom Jr., Eli Goree, Kingsley Ben-Adir and Aldis Hodge in One Night In Miami. Courtesy of Amazon Studios hide caption

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Courtesy of Amazon Studios

'One Night In Miami' Humanizes Four Icons

Regina King has won an Oscar and a collection of Emmys as an actor. Now, she's making her debut as a feature film director with One Night In Miami.

'One Night In Miami' Humanizes 4 Icons

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Then presidential candidate Joe Biden speaks at a "Build Back Better" Clean Energy event on July 14, 2020. On Thursday, Biden unveiled an ambitious economic plan just days before he's set to be inaugurated as president. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

$1,400 Checks And Help For The Jobless: What's In Biden's Plan To Rescue The Economy

President-elect Joe Biden is proposing a $1.9 trillion plan to address the coronavirus pandemic and the resulting economic crisis.

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