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David Gilkey and his mother Alyda. Layla Miller hide caption

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Layla Miller

Alyda Gilkey On The Life And Legacy Of Her Son David, Who Put 'Pictures On The Radio'

Gilkey died in 2016 while on assignment in Afghanistan. His mother, Alyda Gilkey, remembers the man behind the lens: an adventurous soul who had a way of putting his subjects at ease.

Alyda Gilkey On The Life And Legacy Of Her Son David, Who Put 'Pictures On The Radio'

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Julie Benbassat for NPR

She Resisted Getting Her Kids The Usual Vaccines. Then The Pandemic Hit

A mother of three in Canada was opposed to getting her kids vaccinated against childhood diseases. The pandemic led her out of that movement. Getting there was a years-long search for answers.

She Resisted Getting Her Kids The Usual Vaccines. Then The Pandemic Hit

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A woman walks in a park along Yangtze River in Wuhan on January 19, 2021. Residents of the city of 11 million, which was the first epicenter of COVID-19, have conflicting emotions as they reckon with the aftermath of the virus and their 76-day lockdown. Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images

Wuhan's Lockdown Memories One Year Later: Pride, Anger, Deep Pain

Jan. 23 marks the one-year anniversary of the strict lockdown imposed on the first epicenter of COVID-19. Here's what residents have to say about their experience.

Wuhan's Lockdown Memories One Year Later: Pride, Anger, Deep Pain

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The U.S. Postal Service is still struggling to deal with mail sent during the recent holiday season. Quinn Klinefelter/NPR hide caption

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Quinn Klinefelter/NPR

'There's No End In Sight': Mail Delivery Delays Continue Across The Country

WDET 101.9 FM

The U.S. Postal Service is still digging out from under an avalanche of mail sent over the holidays. Plus, the system has been strained by the impact of COVID-19 on its workflow and workforce.

'There's No End In Sight': Mail Delivery Delays Continue Across The Country

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Chantelly Manzanares grades her daughter Rosabella's spelling test. Because her mother is deaf, Rosabella sometimes uses American Sign Language to interpret what's happening in her classes on Zoom. Kristin Gourlay hide caption

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Kristin Gourlay

Parents With Disabilities Face Extra Hurdles With Kids' Remote Schooling

Parents with disabilities often face extra issues with remote learning. A deaf mom whose first language is American Sign Language is navigating the challenge of monitoring her hearing child's work.

Parents With Disabilities Face Extra Hurdles With Kids' Remote Schooling

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The social network MeWe is among a number of apps seeing an influx of users after Facebook and Twitter kicked off former President Donald Trump. Chesnot/Getty Images hide caption

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Chesnot/Getty Images

Fast-Growing Alternative To Facebook And Twitter Finds Post-Trump Surge 'Messy'

Social network MeWe began as a privacy-focused alternative to Facebook. Trump supporters and right-wing groups disillusioned with mainstream social media have flocked to it since the Jan. 6 riot.

President Biden speaks on his administration's response to the economic crisis in the State Dining Room of the White House on Friday. Ken Cedeno/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ken Cedeno/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Opinion: Joe Biden's Lifetime Of Experience

NPR's Scott Simon reflects on the life and career of the nation's newest, and oldest, president.

Opinion: Joe Biden's Lifetime Of Experience

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Retired U.S. Army Gen. Lloyd Austin was confirmed as the next secretary of defense. He is seen above speaking after being nominated by then-President-elect Joe Biden last month. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Lloyd Austin Confirmed As Secretary of Defense, Becomes First Black Pentagon Chief

Austin's near-unanimous confirmation came despite concerns raised on both sides of the aisle that he hadn't been out of uniform for the legally-mandated minimum seven-year period.

Demonstrators hold signs at a rally about redistricting outside the U.S. Supreme Court in 2019. The Census Bureau said Friday it has "suspended indefinitely" work on citizenship data that a GOP strategist said would be "advantageous to Republicans and Non-Hispanic Whites" during redistricting. Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Biden Administration Tables Trump's Citizenship Data Request For Redistricting

Trump officials had directed the Census Bureau to use government records to produce data that a GOP strategist said would be "advantageous to Republicans and Non-Hispanic Whites" during redistricting.

South Korea's KF94 mask does a good job concealing Mona Lisa's smile — but how effective is it at preventing coronavirus spread? Above: masked pedestrians in a shopping district in Seoul. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

Coronavirus FAQ: Why Am I Suddenly Hearing So Much About KF94 Masks?

There are N95s, reserved for health workers. There are KN95s, which you can buy easily — except that quality may vary. And now South Korea's KF94 masks are getting a lot of buzz.

Tabla player Zakir Hussain (left) accompanies sarod player Ali Akbar Khan and his wife and collaborator Mary Khan. Courtesy of the Owsley Stanley Foundation hide caption

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Courtesy of the Owsley Stanley Foundation

When The Giants Of Indian Classical Music Collided With Psychedelic San Francisco

The new live album That Which Colors the Mind, recorded in 1970 by Grateful Dead sound man Owsley Stanley, captures a riveting performance by Ali Akbar Khan, Zakir Hussain and Indranil Bhattacharya.

When The Giants Of Indian Classical Music Collided With Psychedelic San Francisco

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Cemetery workers carry the remains of 89-year-old Abilio Ribeiro, who died of the new coronavirus, for burial at the Nossa Senhora Aparecida cemetery in Manaus, Amazonas state, Brazil, on Jan. 6. The day before, Manaus declared a 180-day state of emergency due to a surge of new cases of the coronavirus. Edmar Barros/AP hide caption

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Edmar Barros/AP

Coronavirus Crisis Gets 'Even Worse' In Brazilian Amazon City Of Manaus

Another surge in coronavirus cases has collapsed Manaus' health system, leading hospitals to run out of beds and oxygen for patients. It's also having a deadly fallout in nearby communities.

Migrants, mainly from Cuba, occupy the Mexican side of the Paso del Norte border bridge, where a plaque marks the border line, as they protest to be allowed into the U.S. to apply for asylum in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, just before midnight on Dec. 29, 2020. Christian Chavez/AP hide caption

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Christian Chavez/AP

Asylum Seekers Hope Biden's Pledge To Welcome Immigrants Includes Them

One of the most daunting immigration challenges facing the Biden administration is what to do about the multitudes of migrants who want asylum protection in the United States.

Asylum Seekers Hope Biden's Pledge To Welcome Immigrants Includes Them

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Audience members in their cars drive past still photos from the Netflix film The Trial of the Chicago 7 at its drive-in premiere in Pasadena, Calif., in October. Pandemic restrictions have led studios to delay some movie releases or shift them from indoor theaters to streaming services. Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

New 007 Release Delayed For 3rd Time As Pandemic Continues To Batter Film Industry

No Time to Die, the 25th film in the James Bond saga, is scheduled to premiere in theaters Oct. 8, a year and a half past its original debut date, MGM said Friday.

Rep. James Clyburn has filed a bill in Congress that would make "Lift Ev'ry Voice And Sing" the U.S. national hymn. Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

Rep. James Clyburn Proposes To Make 'Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing' The National Hymn

Rep. James Clyburn says it's time for "Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing" to be honored as the national hymn, and on Jan. 13, he filed a bill to try to make that official.

Rep. James Clyburn Proposes To Make 'Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing' The National Hymn

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Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei on Jan. 8. A Twitter account believed to be linked to Khamenei was permanently banned Friday after posting a threatening image involving former President Donald Trump. Twitter told The Associated Press the account was a fake. Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader via AP hide caption

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Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader via AP

Twitter Bans Account Linked To Iran's Supreme Leader

An image that seems to threaten former President Donald Trump has prompted Twitter to deactivate an account linked to Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. The image also appears on Khameini's website.

A defining characteristic of the Resistance was its breadth in terms of what different groups cared about. March For Our Lives, for instance, brought together young Americans in favor of gun control. Jim Young/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Young/AFP via Getty Images

With Biden In Place, The 'Resistance' Tries To Pivot From Defense To Offense

With former President Donald Trump out of office, progressive groups are attempting the tricky pivot from fighting Trump's agenda to pushing a new one.

With Biden In Place, The 'Resistance' Tries To Pivot From Defense To Offense

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