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Mourners have built a makeshift memorial for Daunte Wright on the streets of Brooklyn Center, Minn., the quiet inner-ring suburb where police shot and killed Wright on April 11. Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

Brooklyn Center, Minnesota's Most Diverse City, Is In The Spotlight After Shooting

The inner-ring suburb where Daunte Wright was shot by police has diversified dramatically over the last 30 years. Its city administration — and police force — have been slower to change.

U.S. special envoy for climate John Kerry speaks during a roundtable meeting with reporters in Seoul on Sunday. The United States and China have agreed to cooperate with other countries to curb climate change, just days before a virtual summit of world leaders to discuss the issue. U.S. Embassy Seoul via AP hide caption

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U.S. Embassy Seoul via AP

U.S., China Agree To Cooperate On Climate Crisis With Urgency

The world's two biggest carbon polluters agreed to cooperate to curb climate change with "seriousness and urgency" days before President Biden hosts a virtual summit of world leaders on the issue.

Sen. Mazie Hirono (D-Hawaii), says her immigrant journey, detailed in a new memoir, has driven her to "stand up to bullies." Samuel Corum/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/AFP via Getty Images

Quiet No More: Sen. Hirono's Immigrant Journey Fuels Her Fire In Congress

Sen. Mazie Hirono of Hawaii — one of the most outspoken Democrats in Congress — wasn't always so vociferous. She says her story, detailed in a new memoir, has driven her to "stand up to bullies."

Quiet No More: Sen. Hirono's Immigrant Journey Fuels Her Fire In Congress

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A Georgia Tech employee receives a Pfizer coronavirus vaccination on the campus April 8. For a number of Americans, getting their shots is as easy as showing up to their workplace as some companies and institutions provide on-site vaccinations to their employees. Danny Karnik/AP hide caption

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Danny Karnik/AP

For Some Americans, Getting A Vaccine Is As Easy As Showing Up To Work

Companies like Tyson and Amazon are offering on-site coronavirus vaccinations to their employees in order remove barriers to getting the shots.

For Some Americans, Getting A Vaccine Is As Easy As Showing Up To Work

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A doctor for imprisoned Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, who is in the third week of a hunger strike, said on Saturday that his health is deteriorating rapidly and the 44-year-old Kremlin critic could be on the verge of death. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

Putin Critic Alexei Navalny 'Could Die At Any Moment,' Doctor Says

The imprisoned Russian opposition leader, who is three weeks into a hunger strike, is at risk of cardiac arrest or kidney failure, according to test results, his physician says.

Abraar Karan spent time in rural India in 2008 while working for Unite for Sight, a nonprofit group that provides eye care. Above: He interviews a woman about the challenge of living from severe cataracts. Daniel Carvalho hide caption

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Daniel Carvalho

How COVID Reveals The Hypocrisy Of The Global Health 'Experience'

Health workers from the West couldn't help out in other countries due to lockdowns and restrictions. So they turned to help at home. But what is their role in lower resource countries moving forward?

Tanya Karina, a resident artist at the House of Yes, was in Texas waiting to perform at South by Southwest when the news broke about the severity of the pandemic. Since March 2020, Karina has been using their free time studying holistic therapy and learning the dance form of waacking. José A. Alvarado Jr. for NPR hide caption

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José A. Alvarado Jr. for NPR

House Of Yes Performers At Home: How Artists Persevere

The House of Yes performance venue in Brooklyn is closed for now, but the artists that were active in it are busier than ever, finding themselves and making art that speaks to the times we live in.

Researchers have shown that the Indian jumping ant can shrink and regrow its brain. Clint Penick hide caption

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Clint Penick

The Incredible Shrinking And Growing Brains Of Indian Jumping Ants

A new study of Indian jumping ants shows they have the ability to shrink and expand their brains — a first for any insect.

The Incredible Shrinking And Growing Brains Of Indian Jumping Ants

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An NPR investigation into the SolarWinds attack reveals a hack unlike any other, launched by a sophisticated adversary intent on exploiting the soft underbelly of our digital lives. Zoë van Dijk for NPR hide caption

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Zoë van Dijk for NPR

A 'Worst Nightmare' Cyberattack: The Untold Story Of The SolarWinds Hack

Russian hackers exploited gaps in U.S. defenses and spent months in government and corporate networks in one of the most effective cyber espionage campaigns of all time. This is how they did it.

People wait for their turn to receive the COVID-19 vaccine at a government hospital in Chennai, India, on Friday. Arun Sankar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Arun Sankar/AFP via Getty Images

What Can Wealthy Nations Do To Address Global Vaccine Inequity?

In the U.S., more than 1 out of 5 residents is fully vaccinated against COVID-19. But elsewhere in the world, vaccination rates are much lower. Some poor nations have yet to receive a single dose.

What Can Wealthy Nations Do To Address Global Vaccine Inequity?

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Gurdeep Pandher marks his vaccine milestone by doing the bhangra — a traditional dance that originated in Punjab, India — on an iced-over lake in Canada's Yukon territory. Gurdeep Pandher of Yukon/Screengrab by NPR hide caption

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Gurdeep Pandher of Yukon/Screengrab by NPR

Post Vaccine Happy Dance: Not Just Showing Off

People are using social media to proclaim joy at getting a jab. And that's not just boasting. Even in a world of vaccine inequity, these celebratory tweets and videos carry a vital message.

Georgetown Law School professor Paul Butler testifies before a House Judiciary Committee hearing on policing practices and law enforcement accountability in June 2020. In an NPR interview, Butler says police in Brooklyn Center, Minn., didn't need to pursue Daunte Wright over an outstanding warrant. Mandel Ngan/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/Pool/Getty Images

Law Professor: Police Hold 'Extraordinary' Power Over Black People In Traffic Stops

Those who don't immediately stop for police are committing "contempt of cop. And bad officers will make you pay for that," law professor Paul Butler argues.

Law Professor: Police Hold 'Extraordinary' Power Over Black People In Traffic Stops

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Trish Andersen

'Renegade' Rug Makers Create Community, Tufting On TikTok

With industrial metal tufting guns, fiber artists can make colorful, textured designs — Pokémon characters, candy wrappers, portraiture — worthy of walls, floors or social media feeds.

'Renegade' Rug Makers Create Community, Tufting On TikTok

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You can do a lot of things with minimal risk after being vaccinated. Although our public health expert says that maybe it's not quite time for a rave or other tightly packed events. Above: Fans take photographs of Megan Thee Stallion at a London show in 2019. Ollie Millington/Getty Images hide caption

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Ollie Millington/Getty Images

Coronavirus FAQ: You're Vaccinated. Cool! Now About Those 'Breakthrough' Infections...

No vaccine is 100% effective. Though so-called "breakthrough" COVID cases are rare, the virus is circulating widely. What's a vaccinated person to do? And ... not do?

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