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Coronavirus has yet to sicken American health workers, as it has in China. But deaths of hospital workers in Asia have heightened scrutiny of the U.S. health care system's ability to protect people on the front line. Thomas Northcut/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Northcut/Getty Images

As U.S. Preps For Coronavirus, Health Workers Question Safety Measures

The plight of Chinese health care workers contracting the coronavirus has prompted frontline medical staff in the U.S. to wonder if they're protected. Hospitals say they're taking steps to prepare.

As U.S. Preps For Coronavirus, Health Workers Question Safety Measures

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Sen. Amy Klobuchar, of Minnesota, has repeatedly said she's the Democratic presidential candidate who "brings the receipts." The expression has been popular online since it was first used by singer Whitney Houston in a 2002 interview. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

What Amy Klobuchar Is Really Saying When She Talks About Having 'Receipts'

The senator from Minnesota often references "the receipts" on the presidential campaign trail. Linguists say the slang phrase emphasizes accountability and works across audiences.

Demonstrators rally for better wages outside a McDonald's restaurant in Chicago in December 2013. Paul Beaty/AP hide caption

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Paul Beaty/AP

'Gives Me Hope': How Low-Paid Workers Rose Up Against Stagnant Wages

When some fast-food workers in New York went on strike one morning in 2012, they had no idea it was the beginning of an unlikely movement that would propel an economic revolution.

'Gives Me Hope': How Low-Paid Workers Rose Up Against Stagnant Wages

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Milwaukee (left), Pueblo, Colo., and Charlotte, N.C. are three of the locations NPR's Where Voters Are project will highlight throughout the year. Eric Baradat/AFP, Kevin J. Beaty for NPR and Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP, Kevin J. Beaty for NPR and Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images

The 8 Key Places That Will Explain The 2020 Election

Manufacturing is down in Pueblo, Colo. New residents are flocking to Dallas and Charlotte. Here's a look at why these changing communities will matter this November.

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Ronda Goldfein, who leads the Philadelphia nonprofit Safehouse, says the group will open the first supervised injection site in the country next week over objections of the Department of Justice and some community members. Natalie Piserchio for NPR hide caption

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Natalie Piserchio for NPR

Philadelphia Nonprofit Opening Nation's First Supervised Injection Site Next Week

After a two-year legal saga, Safehouse says it will open next week, allowing users to administer illegal drugs under supervision. Federal officials say they will try to stop the site from opening.

Bre Clark leads a workshop at the Schweinhaut Senior Center in Silver Spring, Md., called How to Spot Fake News. Sam Gringlas/NPR hide caption

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Sam Gringlas/NPR

With An Election On The Horizon, Older Adults Get Help Spotting Fake News

Middle and high schools have been adding courses about how to spot fake news. Older adults also struggle to sort disinformation online, but there are fewer resources tackling the problem.

With An Election On The Horizon, Older Adults Get Help Spotting Fake News

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Players would enter up, up, down, down, left, right, left, right, B, A and Start on a controller to activate the "Konami code." It was first used in the game Gradius, but later made famous on Nintendo with Contra. William Warby/Flickr hide caption

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William Warby/Flickr

Kazuhisa Hashimoto, Creator Of Famous 'Konami Code' Gaming Cheat, Dies

Hashimoto, a programmer for video game company Konami, had said he created the code to help him test the game Gladius. The code later appeared as easter eggs in pop culture.

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