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In a file photo from Nov. 6, 2022, California Gov. Gavin Newsom appears at a rally in support of Proposition 1, a state constitutional amendment to guarantee the right to abortion and contraception. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

California proposes a law to allow Arizona doctors to perform abortions as ban proceeds

California Gov. Gavin Newsom says his administration is working on emergency legislation. Earlier this month, the Arizona Supreme Court ruled that a near-total abortion ban could take effect.

Yufei Zhang of Team China competing during the Tokyo Olympics in 2021. Zhang won four medals in Tokyo including two gold and now is among 23 Chinese swimmers embroiled in a doping scandal. Tom Pennington/Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Pennington/Getty Images

'Ban them all.' With Paris Games looming, a Chinese doping scandal rocks an Olympic sport

The World Anti-Doping Agency acknowledges it knew of doping concerns involving 23 Chinese swimmers before the 2021 Tokyo Games but failed to alert others. Some of those swimmers later won gold medals.

'Ban them all.' With Paris Games looming, Chinese doping scandal rocks Olympic sport

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Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop

Earth Day 2024: 8 ways to live more sustainably

Climate change calls for long-term, systemic solutions, but that doesn't mean we can't all strive to live more sustainably. Life Kit is here with solutions from your kitchen to your closet.

Earth Day 2024: 8 ways to live more sustainably

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Scholars Susan Ashbrook Harvey, left, and Robin Darling Young became 'sworn siblings' after an ancient ritual at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. Keren Carrion/NPR; Jodi Hilton for NPR hide caption

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Keren Carrion/NPR; Jodi Hilton for NPR

How two good friends became sworn siblings — with the revival of an ancient ritual

Thousands of years ago, there was a ceremony to bind close friends together as sworn siblings. Could the practice be resurrected today to strengthen modern friendships? Two women did just that.

How two good friends became sworn siblings — with the revival of an ancient ritual

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Artists UMI (left) and Louis VI (right) teamed up with the Museum for the United Nations - UN Live to re-release songs with nature sounds for Earth Day. Ryusei Sabi, Orson Esquivel hide caption

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Ryusei Sabi, Orson Esquivel

Nature has a mixtape. The U.N. hopes young people will listen to it

The Museum for the United Nations has partnered with musicians to re-release some of their songs with added nature sounds to generate royalties for conservation efforts.

Nature has a mixtape. The U.N. hopes young people will listen to it

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Lisa Winton, co-founder of Winton Machine Company, sees herself as fiscally conservative but socially liberal. She is currently undecided, and would like to see a better solution. Winton Machine Company hide caption

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Winton Machine Company

4 'American Indicators' share their view of the U.S. economy — and their politics

The economy is a top voting issue for many Americans. Four "American Indicators," people reflecting different sectors of the economy in different parts of the country, talk about their politics.

Drug companies often do one-on-one outreach to doctors. A new study finds these meetings with drug reps lead to more prescriptions for cancer patients, but not longer survival. Chris Hondros/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Hondros/Getty Images

Oncologists' meetings with drug reps don't help cancer patients live longer

Drug company reps commonly visit doctors to talk about new medications. A team of economists wanted to know if that helps patients live longer. They found that for cancer patients, the answer is no.

Oncologists' meetings with drug reps don't help cancer patients live longer

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The historical marker that omits parts of the Young-Dent family's past is on the grounds of Fendall Hall in Eufaula. The back side of the marker says Edward Brown Young was a "banker, merchant and entrepreneur." The back side also says that he "organized the company which built the first bridge" in Eufaula and that his daughter married a Confederate captain in the "War Between the States." Andi Rice for NPR hide caption

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Andi Rice for NPR

Historical markers are everywhere in America. Some get history wrong

The nation's historical markers delight, distort and, sometimes, just get the story wrong.

Caption goes here Drew Hawkins/Gulf States Newsroom hide caption

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Drew Hawkins/Gulf States Newsroom

Why haven't Kansas and Alabama — among other holdouts — expanded access to Medicaid?

Only 10 states have not joined the federal program that expands Medicaid to people who are still in the "coverage gap" for health care

Why haven't Kansas and Alabama — among other holdouts — expanded access to Medicaid?

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The U.S.-operated GPS has falsely located planes, people and ships, sometimes placing them at the Beirut's international airport. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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Hassan Ammar/AP

Israel 'spoofs' GPS to deter attacks, but it also throws off planes, ships and apps

GPS "spoofing" sends false location signals to satellites to deter rockets and missiles. It also increases risks for planes, ships and technology that rely on the system.

Israel 'spoofs' GPS to deter attacks, but it also throws off planes, ships and apps

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Structures in the Freedom Monument Sclupture park give a sense of the homes enslaved individuals lived in. Equal Justice Initiative hide caption

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Equal Justice Initiative

Freedom Monument Park tells the honest stories of enslaved people

Troy Public Radio

The new Freedom Monument Sculpture Park in Montgomery, Alabama, is designed to get visitors closer to the experiences of enslaved people in America.

Freedom Monument Park tells honest story of enslaved people

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Terry Anderson, who was the longest held American hostage in Lebanon, grins with his 6-year-old daughter Sulome, Dec. 4, 1991, as they leave the U.S. Ambassador's residence in Damascus, Syria, following Anderson's release. Santiago Lyon/AP hide caption

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Santiago Lyon/AP

Terry Anderson, AP reporter held captive for years, dies at 76

Snatched from a street in war-torn Lebanon in 1985, reporter Terry Andersen chronicled his years of imprisonment in a 1993 best-selling book. He died at home in New York on Sunday.

A new version of the popular board game Catan, which hits shelves this summer, introduces energy production and pollution into the gameplay. Catan GmbH hide caption

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Catan GmbH

How do you build without over polluting? That's the challenge of a new Catan board game

A new version of the popular board game Catan aims to make players wrestle with a 21st-century problem: How do you develop and expand without overly polluting the planet?

How do you build without over polluting? That's the challenge of new Catan board game

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Although matzo sold in supermarkets is typically square, the round matzo is believed to be the earliest form of this unleavened bread that is eaten during the Passover holiday as a symbol of both suffering and freedom. Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP via Getty Images

Matzo — Passover's bread of affliction and freedom — is a timely tradition

Bread — and the lack thereof — plays a role in many corners of the world facing a crisis, from Israel and Gaza to Ukraine to Afghanistan to Sudan.

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