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A thylacine or 'Tasmanian tiger' in captivity, circa 1930. These animals are thought to be extinct, since the last known wild thylacine was shot in 1930 and the last captive one died in 1936. Topical Press Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Topical Press Agency/Getty Images

The long-lost remains of the last known Tasmanian tiger have been found in a cupboard

The skeleton and skin of what is believed to be the last Tasmanian tiger have been stashed away in a cupboard at a museum in Tasmania, where experts lost track of the bizarre looking creature.

Kirstie Alley attends the premiere of HBO's "Girls" on Jan. 5, 2015, in New York. Alley, a two-time Emmy winner who starred in the 1980s sitcom "Cheers" and the hit film "Look Who's Talking," has died. She was 71. Evan Agostini/Invision hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Invision

Kirstie Alley, star of 'Cheers' and 'Look Who's Talking,' dies at 71

Alley died of cancer that was only recently discovered, her children True and Lillie Parker said in a post on Twitter. The Emmy-winning actress was known for roles including Rebecca Howe on Cheers.

Mary O'Connor, pictured here addressing reporters during a news conference at Tampa Police headquarters in February, resigned after using her position to escape a ticket during a traffic stop. Dirk Shadd/Tampa Bay Times via AP hide caption

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Dirk Shadd/Tampa Bay Times via AP

Tampa police chief resigns after she flashed her badge to escape a traffic stop

Body camera footage showed Police Chief Mary O'Connor saying "I'm hoping you'll just let us go tonight" after a deputy pulled her and her husband over for driving an unregistered golf cart.

This 2021 photo combination released by the U.S. Marshals Service shows James Howard Jackson. The man who shot Lady Gaga's dogwalker and stole two of her French bulldogs in 2021 pleaded no contest to attempted murder Monday, Dec. 5, 2022, and was sentenced to 21 years in prison. U.S. Marshals Service/AP hide caption

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U.S. Marshals Service/AP

The man who shot Lady Gaga's dog walker gets 21 years in prison

The Lady Gaga connection was a coincidence, authorities have said. The motive was the value of the French bulldogs, and detectives do not believe the thieves knew the dogs belonged to the musician.

Mourners gather outside Club Q to visit a memorial, which has been moved from a sidewalk outside of police tape that was surrounding the club, on Friday, Nov. 25, 2022, in Colorado Spring, Colo. Parker Seibold/AP hide caption

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Parker Seibold/AP

The Colorado LGBTQ club shooting suspect is charged with hate crimes

The suspect accused of entering Club Q, opening fire and killing five people and wounding 17 others was charged by prosecutors with 305 criminal counts including hate crimes and murder.

Morocco's Achraf Hakimi scores the decisive penalty Tuesday past Spain's goalkeeper Unai Simon at the end a round of 16 World Cup soccer match at the Education City Stadium in Al Rayyan, Qatar. Ricardo Mazalan/AP hide caption

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Ricardo Mazalan/AP

Morocco shocks Spain to become the first Arab team to reach the World Cup's final 8

After a goal-less 90 minutes and extra time, Spanish players missed all three of their penalty kicks. No team from outside Europe or South America has ever made it this far in the tournament.

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At your service: A restaurant maître d' tells all in 'Your Table Is Ready'

Fresh Air

Michael Cecchi-Azzolina has worked in several high-end New York City restaurants — adrenaline-fueled workplaces where booze and drugs are plentiful and the health inspector will ruin your day.

At your service: A restaurant maître d' tells all in 'Your Table Is Ready'

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A congressional report found financial technology companies, or fintechs, largely fueled PPP loan fraud. Bluevine, a fintech noted in the report, told NPR it adapted to threats of fraud better than other companies mentioned. SOPA Images/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett hide caption

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SOPA Images/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett

A congressional report says financial technology companies fueled rampant PPP fraud

Fraud in the Paycheck Protection Program, which gave potentially forgivable loans to small businesses during the pandemic, was largely due to financial technology companies, according to a new report.

A congressional report says financial technology companies fueled rampant PPP fraud

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Facebook parent Meta appears to be more concerned with avoiding "provoking" VIPs than balancing tricky questions of free speech and safety, its oversight board said. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook's own oversight board slams its special program for VIPs

Oversight board says Facebook parent Meta appears to be more concerned with avoiding "provoking" VIPs and evading accusations of censorship than balancing tricky questions of free speech and safety.

Cyclists and pedestrians enjoy Rock Creek Park's Beach Drive in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 26. The road has been closed to motorized vehicles since April 2020, and officials have decided to keep it closed to vehicles indefinitely. Jacob Fenston/WAMU hide caption

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Jacob Fenston/WAMU

These streets became pedestrian walkways in the pandemic, and cities don't want to go back

Most streets that were closed across the nation so people could get outside more have since reopened. But some permanent closures, such as in Washington, D.C., and San Francisco, are wildly popular.

Someone smashed through this gate Saturday and shot up Duke Energy's West End substation in Moore County, N.C. Nick De La Canal/WFAE hide caption

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Nick De La Canal/WFAE

The attack in North Carolina revealed the U.S. electric grid's Achilles' heel

WFAE

Officials say Saturday night's attacks in Moore County were targeted, with attackers who were knowledgeable about what equipment to hit. About 45,000 customers lost power, making it one of the most serious attacks on the power grid in recent U.S. history.

Stax Records co-founder Jim Stewart (center) poses for a photo with friends and students of the Stax Music Academy on April 29, 2013, in Memphis, Tenn. Stewart died Monday at age 92. Adrian Sainz/AP hide caption

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Adrian Sainz/AP

Jim Stewart, co-founder of Stax Records in Memphis, dies at age 92

The white Tennessee farm boy and fiddle player co-founded the influential record label with his sister in a Black, inner-city Memphis neighborhood and helped build the soulful "Memphis sound."

Oleh Mahlay, the artistic director of the Bandurist Choir, conducts members of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus of North America and Ukrainian Children's Choir at New York City's Carnegie Hall on Sunday. Fadi Kheir hide caption

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Fadi Kheir

Ukrainians sing 'Carol of the Bells' at Carnegie Hall, 100 years after its U.S. debut

A Ukrainian chorus first performed Shchedryk in the U.S. in 1922. A century later, during another fight for freedom, Ukranian singers performed the folk song at the site of its North American debut.

As a prospective college student, McKenna Hensley had to wade through confusing and hard-to-compare financial aid letters, trying to understand which college she could afford. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

College aid letters are misleading students and need a legal fix

New federal research says colleges mislead students with confusing financial aid letters. The consequences can run from extra debt to quitting school.

College aid letters are misleading students and need a legal fix

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Technicians from DTEK, Ukraine's largest private energy company, work to replace a cable at a substation in the Teremky neighborhood of Kyiv on Wednesday. Pete Kiehart for NPR hide caption

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Pete Kiehart for NPR

In an ongoing race, Ukraine tries to repair faster than Russia bombs

Ukraine's electrical grid has been under assault from Russian airstrikes for two months. Repair workers are racing to fix damaged power stations, even as the country braces for more attacks.

In an ongoing race, Ukraine tries to repair faster than Russia bombs

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The central business district skyline is seen during the dusk in Jakarta, Indonesia, Monday, April 29, 2019. Indonesia's Parliament has passed a long-awaited and controversial revision of its penal code, Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2022, that criminalizes extramarital sex and applies to citizens and visiting foreigners alike. Dita Alangkara/AP hide caption

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Dita Alangkara/AP

Indonesia criminalizes adultery, but the law may take up to 3 years to take effect

Indonesia's penal code had languished for decades while legislators in the world's biggest Muslim-majority nation struggled with how to adapt its native culture and norms to the criminal code.

Boxer Legnis Cala, center, talks with fellow female boxers during a training session in Havana, Cuba, Monday, Dec. 5, 2022. Cuban officials announced on Monday that women boxers would be able to compete for the first time ever. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Boxing powerhouse Cuba lets women boxers compete

Cuban officials say women boxers will be able to compete officially after decades of restrictions, though they didn't yet confirm if that would be taken to a professional level like Cuban male boxers.

Lorie Smith, the owner of 303 Creative, a website design company in Colorado, speaks Monday to reporters outside of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

The Supreme Court hears the case of web designer who doesn't want to work on same-sex weddings

Lorie Smith says Colorado's public accommodations laws violate her right of free speech.

Supreme Court hears case of web designer who doesn't want to work on same-sex weddings

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U.S. Capitol Police Chief J. Thomas Manger will speak on behalf of his department at a Congressional Gold Medal ceremony for his officers who defended the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

The security failures from Jan. 6 are largely fixed, the Capitol's police chief says

USCP Chief Tom Manger says problems that led to the Capitol riot have been addressed, and he is focusing on expanding field offices to be better prepared for rising threats to congressional members.

Capitol Police chief: Jan. 6 failures 'largely' fixed but extremism threat persists

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A display at the Computer Game Museum in Berlin, Germany features a standing console of Pong, one of the earliest commercially successful video games. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Reflecting on Pong's video game success, 50 years later

50 years ago, Atari released the original Pong as an arcade game. To mark the anniversary, Atari co-founder and Pong designer Allan Alcorn spoke with NPR to reflect on the game's development.

Reflecting on Pong's video game success, 50 years later

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A cosplayer dressed as the Green Goblin poses for a photograph on arrival to attend the MCM Comic Con at ExCeL exhibition centre in London on October 28, 2022. Isabel Infantes /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Isabel Infantes /AFP via Getty Images

How 'goblin mode' became Oxford's word of the year

The slang term means "behavior which is unapologetically self-indulgent, lazy, slovenly, or greedy, typically in a way that rejects social norms." It was the landslide pick in a public vote.

Karl Goldstein nearly gave up playing the piano, but then a word of encouragement from a tough teacher put him on a lifelong career path. Karl Goldstein hide caption

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Karl Goldstein

A few words of encouragement from his music teacher changed Karl Goldstein's life

Karl Goldstein nearly gave up playing the piano, but a few words from a tough music teacher put him on a lifelong path in music.

A few words of encouragement from his music teacher changed Karl Goldstein's life

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