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Ukrainian State Emergency Service firefighters work to take away debris at a shopping center burned after a rocket attack in Kremenchuk, Ukraine, Tuesday, June 28, 2022. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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Efrem Lukatsky/AP

More than a dozen people died in Russia's missile attack on crowded Ukrainian mall

Russia has been escalating bombardments of Ukrainian cities this week — attacks Moscow says are aimed at military installations but often hit purely civilian targets instead.

An anti-LGBTQ protester carries a semi-automatic rifle as he monitors Coeur d'Alene's "Pride in the Park" event on June 11, 2022. Jim Urquhart for NPR hide caption

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Jim Urquhart for NPR

Idaho's fight against the far right, then and now

The arrest of white nationalists in North Idaho gained national attention. But it has deeper significance for residents who say the region has a history of attracting — and fighting — extremists.

Idaho's fight against the far right, then and now

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Wajahat Malik, right, and a Pakistan Navy seaman navigate the Indus River. Malik organized a 40-day expedition down the 2,000-mile river to document "the peoples, the cultures, the biodiversity and just whatever comes our way," he says — including the impact of climate change and pollution. Diaa Hadid/For NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/For NPR

Floating in a rubber dinghy, a filmmaker documents the Indus River's water woes

Pakistani filmmaker Wajahat Malik pulled together an expedition to raft down the 2,000-mile river. He hopes to reconnect people with the Indus, which is being threatened by overuse and climate change.

Floating in a rubber dinghy, a filmmaker documents the Indus River's water woes

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Mesa County Clerk Tina Peters, a Republican candidate for Secretary of State, at the Colorado Republican State Assembly on Saturday, April 9, 2022. Hart Van Denburg/CPR News hide caption

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Hart Van Denburg/CPR News

National

An indicted Colorado election clerk is running in the Tuesday primary for the top election job

CPR News

Tina Peters, who is charged with 10 counts of election tampering and misconduct — and is known for falsely claiming fraud in the 2020 election — is on the ballot for secretary of state in Colorado.

Blanca Nubia Monroy photographed at her home in Bogotá, Colombia. Her son Julián Oviedo was kidnapped and killed in 2008. The Colombian army is accused of taking civilians, killing them, and disguising them as guerrilla fighters to falsify higher body counts. Carlos Saavedra for NPR hide caption

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Carlos Saavedra for NPR

Colombia's tribunal exposes how troops kidnapped and killed thousands of civilians

Colombian army officers kidnapped and executed over 6,400 civilians from 2002 to 2008 and falsely reported them as Marxist guerrillas killed in combat to boost body counts, a special tribunal found.

Colombia's tribunal exposes how troops kidnapped and killed thousands of civilians

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A photo from Tacos y Birria La Unica's Facebook account. Tacos y Birria La Unica's Quesatacos hide caption

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Tacos y Birria La Unica's Quesatacos

Also hit by inflation? Your local taco truck

Higher prices for gasoline, meat and vegetables and even cooking oil have put pressure on food trucks as they struggle to balance menu prices with customers' expectations of a low-cost meal.

Also hit by inflation? Your local taco truck

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Abortion rights demonstrator Elizabeth White leads a chant in response to the Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization ruling in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on June 24, 2022. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Frustration at Biden and other Democrats grows among abortion-rights supporters

While abortion-rights supporters have focused their anger at the Supreme Court, but there was plenty aimed at Democrats who they feel let them down.

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer speaks to abortion-rights protesters Friday at a rally outside the state capitol in Lansing, Mich., following the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

Michigan shapes up as one of the next abortion battlefronts

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer tells NPR that abortion-rights supporters are fighting on all fronts to keep a 1931 ban from going back into effect.

Michigan shapes up as one of the next abortion battlefronts

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The 2021 study found that 32% of pharmacies did not have levonorgestrel, a hormone that can prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex, in stock at all, and of the pharmacies that did have it on the shelf, 70% of them kept it in a locked box. Seth Herald/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Seth Herald/AFP via Getty Images

Emergency contraception pills are safe and effective, but not always available

To best protect against unintended pregnancy, emergency contraceptives like Plan B or Ella need to be taken within five days of unprotected sex, but a large number of pharmacies don't stock the pills.

Paradegoers celebrate at the New York City Pride parade on Sunday. Steven Molina Contreras for NPR hide caption

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Steven Molina Contreras for NPR

NYC Pride sees fresh wave of activism from Supreme Court's abortion decision

For the first time since COVID, the LGBTQ Pride Parade happened in New York City on Sunday, June 26, 2022.

NYC Pride sees fresh wave of activism from Supreme Court's abortion decision

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Megan Thee Stallion, performing at the Glastonbury Festival in Somerset, U.K., on Saturday. During her set, Megan spoke out against the Supreme Court's decision overturning Roe v. Wade. Ben Birchall/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Birchall/PA Images via Getty Images

Musicians react to the Supreme Court decision on the right to an abortion

After Friday's Supreme Court decision, artists from around the world spent the following days sharing their reactions and plans for the immediate future.

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