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Some families wait years to get a housing voucher only to find out many landlords won't accept them. Beck Harlan hide caption

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Beck Harlan

Government Housing Vouchers Are Hard To Get, And Hard To Use

The federal government plans to release $5 billion in new housing vouchers to help those at risk of homelessness. Low-income tenants often struggle to find landlords who will accept such vouchers.

Government Housing Vouchers Are Hard To Get, And Hard To Use

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John Calhoun of Flathead County has diabetes and was convinced by an old friend to get vaccinated, through he suspects the coronavirus isn't as dangerous as health officials say it is. He's hoping vaccination will ease divisions over masking. Katheryn Houghton/KHN hide caption

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Katheryn Houghton/KHN

Families, Communities Divided Over COVID Vaccination In Rural Montana

Kaiser Health News

In sprawling Flathead County, only 25% of adults are fully vaccinated against COVID-19. Public health experts worry about reservoirs of potential outbreaks as neighbors still debate the virus' danger.

New York Rep. Elise Stefanik, seen here at the U.S. Capitol during the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump on Jan. 23, is poised to replace Rep. Liz Cheney as the No. 3 Republican in the House. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Et Tu, Elise? Cheney Set To Lose Leadership Job To Rep. Who Nominated Her For It

Elise Stefanik, a four-term congresswoman, is working to remove Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., from her leadership post over her ongoing criticism of former President Donald Trump.

Et Tu, Elise? Cheney Set To Lose Leadership Job To Lawmaker Who Nominated Her For It

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In 1995, an online troll impersonated Ken Zeran on AOL, posting tasteless ads with his phone number. Zeran sued AOL, and lost. The person behind the ads has never been identified. Jovelle Tamayo for NPR hide caption

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Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

How One Man's Fight Against An AOL Troll Sealed The Tech Industry's Power

A fight between a Seattle man and AOL in the mid-1990s led to what has been called "the most important Internet law ruling ever." Decades later, the decision still governs how the web functions.

How One Man's Fight Against An AOL Troll Sealed The Tech Industry's Power

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Members of the Montana Conservation Corps (MCC) work on the trails near Tally Lake in northwestern Montana. President Biden wants to retool and relaunch one of the country's most celebrated government programs: the Civilian Conservation Corps. MCC crews are already doing some of the work envisioned in Biden's climate proposal. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Reaching Back To The New Deal, Biden Proposes A Civilian Climate Corps

To bolster the country's preparedness for a warming world and create jobs, President Biden wants to retool and relaunch one of the most celebrated U.S. government programs, first established by FDR.

Reaching Back To The New Deal, Biden Proposes A Civilian Climate Corps

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New York's Lincoln Center, as people gather for its reopening on Monday, May 10. Jeff Lunden/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Lunden/NPR

A Transformed Lincoln Center In New York City Brings Back Live Audiences

The past year, with COVID and calls for social justice, has made those running Lincoln Center and other arts organizations question their core missions, says Lincoln Center's president Henry Timms.

A Transformed Lincoln Center In New York City Brings Back Live Audiences

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The Royal Dutch Shell refinery in Norco, Louisiana. The state is a major petrochemical and oil and gas producer, but Governor John Bel Edwards has called for a plan to dramatically reduce climate warming emissions. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Louisiana's Governor Wants The Oil And Gas State To Go Carbon Neutral

WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

In a major shift, Louisiana officials are making a plan to ramp up clean energy. Governor John Bel Edwards says the state must reduce the emissions fueling increasingly destructive extreme weather.

This 16-year-old got his Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 shot late last month at the UCI Health Family Health Center in Anaheim, Calif. Students as young as 12 are now eligible to get the vaccine, too, the FDA says. Paul Bersebach/MediaNews Group/Orange County Register via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Bersebach/MediaNews Group/Orange County Register via Getty Images

FAQ: What You Need To Know About Pfizer's COVID Vaccine And Adolescents

Adolescents age 12 and older are now eligible to be vaccinated against COVID-19, the FDA says. But when and where, and what about younger kids? You have questions. We have answers.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren holds a news conference in March. She and Sen. Bernie Sanders are leading the push to introduce a bill Tuesday that would make pandemic-related food benefits for college students permanent, and create grants for colleges to address hunger. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Warren, Sanders Call For Expanding Food Aid To College Students

The senators are introducing a bill that would make pandemic-related food benefits for college students permanent and create grants for colleges to address hunger.

Shakuntala Thilsted, winner of the 2021 World Food Prize, is one of the world's leading experts on the nutritional benefits of small fish. Finn Thilsted/Finn Thilsted hide caption

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Finn Thilsted/Finn Thilsted

Why This World Food Prize Winner Wants You To Reconsider Anchovies

Shakuntala Thilsted, one of the world's leading researchers of aquatic foods, says small fish like herring or anchovies pack a huge nutritional punch. She recommends grinding them up into fish powder!

There is a group of about 150 people in federal prison known as "old law" prisoners who committed crimes before November 1987 and still have little hope of release. Cornelia Li for NPR hide caption

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Cornelia Li for NPR

Forgetting And Forgotten: Older Prisoners Seek Release But Fall Through The Cracks

Prisoners like Kent Clark who broke the law before 1987 should have a chance at parole, unlike more recent inmates. But there are dozens of men in their 60s and older who have little hope of release.

Forgetting And Forgotten: Older Prisoners Seek Release But Fall Through The Cracks

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Relatives of students who attend a school in the Russian city of Kazan, where a gunman opened fire on Tuesday, killing several students and at least one teacher and injuring more than 20 others. Yegor Aleyev/TASS via Getty Images hide caption

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Yegor Aleyev/TASS via Getty Images

At Least 9 Dead In School Shooting In Russia

Officials say a 19-year-old former student at a school in the Russian city of Kazan opened fire there Tuesday, killing at least seven students, a teacher and a school worker.

Gremlin/Getty Images

That Subject You've Been Avoiding? Anna Sale Says It's Time To Talk About It

NPR's Noel King talks to Anna Sale of the podcast 'Death, Sex & Money' about her new book, "Let's Talk About Hard Things."

That Subject You've Been Avoiding? Anna Sale Says It's Time To Talk About It

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City Council candidate Stanley Martin stands in front of an informal memorial to Daniel Prude in Rochester, N.Y. Prude was a man with mental health and drug issues who died last year after being taken into police custody. Mustafa Hussain for NPR hide caption

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Mustafa Hussain for NPR

Rochester, N.Y., Wants To Reimagine Police. What Do People Imagine That Means?

Stanley Martin wants to rethink Rochester police — a radical new plan to abolish the police gradually. Others also talk about "reimagining" police, though they mean the same word very differently.

Rochester, N.Y., Wants To Reimagine Police. What Do People Imagine That Means?

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A member of a pro-Trump mob bashes an entrance of the Capitol building in an attempt to gain access on Jan. 6. The U.S. Capitol Police's inspector general has pointed to intelligence failures in the lead-up to the insurrection. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Watchdog: Capitol Police Need To Boost Counterintelligence To Address Rising Threats

The hearing with the Capitol Police inspector general comes as the department says threats to members of Congress are up 107% over last year.

President Biden delivers remarks on the economy in the East Room of the White House on Monday, pushing back on critics who say the American Rescue Plan is making the economy worse. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Americans Will Lose Unemployment Benefits If They Turn Down Jobs, Biden Says

Biden said that his administration would not stand for people gaming the system, but pressed the importance of continued financial support for those left jobless as a result of the coronavirus crisis.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks during a press conference in Oakland, Calif., on Monday where he announced a new round of $600 stimulus checks residents making up to $75,000 a year. Newsom also announced a projected $75.7 billion budget surplus compared to last year's projected $54.3 billion shortfall. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Facing A Recall And A Massive Surplus, Gov. Newsom Proposes More Stimulus Checks

CapRadio News

Monday, California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced a plan to send billions in state surplus dollars back to residents. Republicans who support recalling Newsom from office are questioning his timing.

Facing A Recall And A Massive Surplus, Gov. Newsom Proposes More Stimulus Checks

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The Hollywood Foreign Press Association voted last week to approve an overhaul proposal but the group's pledges of transformation have done little to reassure entertainment companies. Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Hollywood Foreign Press Association hide caption

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Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Hollywood Foreign Press Association

NBC Won't Air 2022 Golden Globes In Rebuke To Hollywood Foreign Press Association

The press association promised to improve diversity and other factors. NBC said it hopes to see enough change to run the show in 2023.

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