NPR Special Coverage: Does Climate Change Matter? Multiplatform Coverage Leading Up to the Paris U.N. Climate Change Conference Starts Nov. 4 and Continues Through mid-December
NPR logo NPR Special Coverage: Does Climate Change Matter?

NPR Special Coverage: Does Climate Change Matter?

Expansive Look at Key Environmental Issues Leading Up to the Paris U.N. Climate Change Conference

Multiplatform Coverage Starts Nov. 4 and Continues Through mid-December

November 2, 2015; Washington, D.C. – The United Nations is trying to get nearly 200 countries to agree on a plan to fight global warming, their summit starts November 30 in Paris. The global community has tried to address this in the past, so what is different this time? Has anything changed?

NPR journalists across the globe and down the street will provide ambitious coverage to explain the consequences of the Paris Climate Change Conference on air and online and across beats—science, business, politics.

"NPR's comprehensive coverage around the climate change conference will give our listeners a 360 view of one of the most important issues of our time in a way only NPR's combination of international and local reporting can," said Edith Chapin, Executive Editor, NPR News.

Elizeu Berçacola, a leader of a group of rubber tappers in Machadinho d'Oeste in the Brazilian state of Rondonia, just after burring down three illegal logging camps. There is a war over the future of the Amazon rainforest in Brazil: those that are fighting it call it 'the war over wood.' Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Elizeu Berçacola, a leader of a group of rubber tappers in Machadinho d'Oeste in the Brazilian state of Rondonia, just after burring down three illegal logging camps. There is a war over the future of the Amazon rainforest in Brazil: those that are fighting it call it 'the war over wood.'

Kainaz Amaria/NPR

This week NPR travels to the Amazon with South America correspondent Lourdes Garcia Navarro to understand how deforestation happens and why this fragile rain-forest ecosystem could be at a tipping point because of it. The five-part series will air on Morning Edition and will be complemented by an NPR Visuals special report on deforestation, available in English, Spanish and Portuguese, featuring starkly compelling original images. After NPR journalists trekked halfway around the world to report on climate change, the Planet Money podcast answers the questions: Do carbon offsets actually work? Can paying to plant trees really undo the environmental damage of a transcontinental airplane ride?

In the weeks leading up to the Paris summit, there will be stories in NPR's Morning Edition, Here & Now and All Things Considered bringing diverse and local perspectives to these issues.

Through NPR's recently announced Energy and Environment team, a collaborative coverage initiative with NPR Member stations across the country, climate change in our backyards and in local communities will be featured.

A one-hour special hosted by Ari Shapiro will air on many local NPR stations on the week of November 30 as the Paris summit starts and be available afterwards at npr.org.

  • The NPR science desk will explore how serious the situation is, if humans and emissions of CO2 are to blame and why some scientists say this might be our last chance to save the earth.
  • NPR international correspondents in India, Indonesia, and China will look at the complex relationship between economics, technology, access to energy, and fuel subsidies.
  • From NPR's political team, listeners will hear about how the U.S. pledges square up with public opinion and will play out in Congress.
  • NPR's business desk will contribute on what the business community is willing to do, how much money, what key technologies developing countries will need to pay for this and what strings will be attached to the money.
  • This special will also provide historical context: what has happened since the 1997 Kyoto Protocol and the 2009 Copenhagen Summit and what is different now.

NPR will also have live reports from Paris where Shapiro will lead a team including Eleanor Beardsley and the science desk's Chris Joyce. They will address questions like: What would the world look like if Paris succeeds? What would it look like if it were to fail?

NPR News produces coverage of the environment and climate that is broad in scope and touches multiple disciplines in order to fully understand topics such as climate change.

NPR's award-winning reporting runs the gamut from pumps to combat rising sea levels in Florida; how clean energy connects to California's pension fund; farmers switching from wheat to corn and searching for alternatives because of climate change; droughts in Arizona, California and Latin America; algal blooms in the Great Lakes; and world leaders convening for a climate change summit. The range of coverage demonstrates NPR's holistic commitment to the topic. NPR's Member Stations are also a vital component, enhancing NPR's coverage of everything from local votes on fracking to links between trees and drought in California to the heated debate over the Keystone XL pipeline.

About NPR
NPR connects to audiences on the air, online, and in person. More than 26 million radio listeners tune in to NPR each week and more than 30 million unique visitors access NPR.org each month making NPR one of the most trusted sources of news and insights on life and the arts. NPR shares compelling stories, audio and photos with millions of social media users on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, YouTube and Snapchat; NPR News and NPR One apps, online streaming, podcasts, iTunes radio and connected car dashboards help meet audiences where they are. NPR's live events bring to the stage two-way conversations between NPR hosts and the audience in collaboration with the public radio Member Station community. This robust access to public service journalism makes NPR an indispensable resource in the media landscape.

Contact
NPR Media Relations: Isabel Lara
Email: mediarelations (at) npr.org