Introducing The 2016 Kroc Fellows Immersive fellowship underscores NPR's commitment to training the next generation of journalists
NPR logo Introducing The 2016 Kroc Fellows

Introducing The 2016 Kroc Fellows

Immersive fellowship underscores NPR's commitment to training the next generation of journalists

Jessica Diaz-Hurtado, Stephan Bisaha and Parth Shah will begin their fellowship with NPR in September 2016. Images courtesy of the Fellows hide caption

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Images courtesy of the Fellows

August 22, 2016; Washington, D.C. – NPR is proud to welcome the 2016 cohort of Kroc Fellows, a program identifying and developing a new generation of talented public radio journalists. Jessica Diaz-Hurtado, Stephan Bisaha and Parth Shah will begin their fellowship with NPR in September 2016.

For a year they will rotate through various units at NPR, in both the News and Digital Divisions, and at an NPR Member Station. The NPR Kroc Fellows will work alongside some of the nation's most respected reporters, producers and editors and receive regular instruction in writing for radio and on-air performance.

Meet The 2016 NPR Kroc Fellows

Born and raised in the Washington D.C. area, Jessica Diaz-Hurtado is a poet, journalist and multimedia storyteller. With roots in Latin America, her work focuses on immigration, race, conflict and culture. She received her B.A. in Latin American and Caribbean Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and was awarded the First Wave Hip Hop and Urban Arts Scholarship. She also received her M.A. in Latin American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin as a Ronald E. McNair Scholar. In 2014 she directed and produced her award winning documentary series, Ta Ligado: Rodas e Hip Hop no Rio, on Rio de Janeiro's youth hip hop culture. After graduating, she was a freelance multimedia journalist in South America. Jessica plans on utilizing her innovative ideas and commitment to storytelling to contribute to public media's growing platforms.

Stephan Bisaha recently completed his Master of Science in Journalism at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism in New York City. He is partaking in the school's inaugural data journalism concentration through which he has developed experience reporting with data, such as digging through NYC school test scores and crime statistics to investigating concerns over government transparency. Stephan has also covered NYC politics for Uptown Radio, Columbia's radio news magazine program, where he learned from a diverse set of public radio reporters, including Marketplace's Sally Herships and Radio Ambulante's Daniel Alarcón. Before Columbia, he taught a radio workshop course at his alma mater, William Paterson University. Stephan plans on using his data skills to contribute to NPR's strong tradition of exceptional journalism.

Parth Shah grew up in North Carolina and graduated from UNC Chapel Hill in May 2015. During undergrad, Parth produced radio features for his school's news magazine Carolina Connection and founded Monsoon, a South Asian American affairs magazine. Parth recently completed the Lee Ester News Fellowship at Wisconsin Public Radio where he spent nearly a year as a general assignment reporter in Madison, Wisconsin. He's also the founder and host of Hyphen, a podcast about identity. When he's not editing audio, one can find Parth dancing with Wisconsin Surma, UW Madison's nationally competitive Bollywood fusion dance team.

During their year-long rotations the Fellows will receive training at each stage from an experienced producer, editor, or reporter. Among other things, they will learn how to pitch news stories, find sources, book interviews, report stories, and work in the studio. The Fellows will spend most of their time at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., but each will also have an assignment at an NPR Member Station in Spring 2017.

Kroc Fellowship alums are now in newsrooms across the country and the world. Previous Fellows include NPR voices like Sam Sanders, Aarti Shahani, Hansi Lo Wang and Ailsa Chang.

The Fellowships have been made possible by a bequest to NPR from Joan Kroc, widow of McDonald's Corporation founder Ray A. Kroc. In 2003, Mrs. Kroc left NPR more than $200 million, which — among other things — is being used to deepen and strengthen the NPR News and Digital Media Divisions.

Contact

Hugo Rojo, NPR Media Relations

mediarelations@npr.org / 202.513.2300