New Poll on Sexual Harassment, Civility, and Political Discourse A new NPR/PBS Newshour/Marist poll reveals American's attitudes towards political discourse in our country as well as the pervasiveness of sexual harassment in the workplace.
NPR logo New Poll on Sexual Harassment, Civility, and Political Discourse

New Poll on Sexual Harassment, Civility, and Political Discourse

NPR/PBS Newshour/Marist Poll NPR hide caption

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NPR/PBS Newshour/Marist Poll

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Monday, November 20th 2017; Washington, D.C. - It should come as no surprise that a majority of Americans (58%) who celebrate the Thanksgiving holiday dread the thought of political discussions at the table. A new NPR/PBS Newshour/Marist poll reveals American's attitudes towards political discourse in our country – the findings show a perception of bitterness and lack of civility when it comes to politics.


Additionally, with national attention focused on repeated allegations of high-profile sexual harassment, NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist conducted a separate poll on the pervasive problem of sexual harassment in the workplace. The poll found that over one in three women report being sexually harassed in their workplace.


All references to survey should be sourced as NPR/PBS Newshour/Marist Poll.

Read more analysis from NPR: HERE

Read the full findings of the survey: HERE

Key Findings on Political Discourse:

  • 58% of Americans who celebrate Thanksgiving dread the thought of having to talk politics at Thanksgiving dinner, 31% are eager to discuss politics, and 11% are unsure.
  • 65% of Democrats, 56% of Independents and 49% of Republicans dread discussing politics at Thanksgiving
  • 47% of Americans find it stressful to discuss politics with someone who has a different opinion of President Donald Trump, 43% find it interesting and informative
  • 63% of Democrats find it stressful and frustrating to discuss politics with someone who has a different opinion of President Donald Trump, while 40% of Republicans find it stressful and frustrating.
  • 52% of Republics find it interesting and informative to discuss politics with someone who has a different opinion of President Donald Trump, 28% of Democrats find it interesting and informative.
  • 33% of adults believe the country is headed in the right direction, 59% believe it's headed in the wrong direction.
  • 11% of Americans have a positive view of the political discourse in this country
  • 86% of Americans have a negative view of political discourse in this country, 36% describe it as "somewhat negative," 14% describe it as "very negative but not angry," and 36% describe it as "angry."
  • 66% of Americans believe Democrats have crossed the line when discussing politics, 67% say the same about Republicans, and 70% think President Trump has gone too far in his approach.
  • 67% of Americans believe the overall tone and civility in Washington D.C. has gotten worse since President Trump was elected, 23% say it has stayed the same, and 6% believe it has gotten better.
  • 39% of Americans approve of how President Trump is doing his job, 86% of Republicans approve of Trump, 39% of Independent approve of Trump, and 88% of Democrats disapprove.
  • 43% of registered voters say they would support a Democrat in their home Congressional district, while 40% say they would support a Republican.
  • 57% of adults disapprove of how Republicans are handling tax reform, 31% approve, and 12% are unsure.
  • 66% of Americans oppose a tax cut if it means the nation's deficit will grow, 26% are in favor of such an action.

Key Finding on Sexual Harassment:

  • 22% of Americans report having experienced sexual harassment in the workplace.
  • 35% of women report having experienced sexual harassment in the workplace.
  • 9% of men report being the victim of unwanted sexual advances.
  • 87% of employed Americans believe their place of business provides enough protections against sexual harassment and abuse.
  • 64% of workers say their place of employment is more likely to believe the accuser, while 18% say the accused will get the benefit of the doubt.

Contact:

Ben Fishel, NPR Media Relations
Email: mediarelations (at) npr.org