NPR/Ipsos Poll: After Parkland, Desire for Gun Restrictions Grows An increasing number of Americans, both Republicans and Democrats, want more gun regulation, according to a new NPR/Ipsos poll that surveyed people in the aftermath of the Parkland school shooting.
NPR logo NPR/Ipsos Poll: After Parkland, Desire for Gun Restrictions Grows

NPR/Ipsos Poll: After Parkland, Desire for Gun Restrictions Grows

Vince Warner fires an AK-47 with a bump stock installed at Good Guys Gun and Range in Utah. A significant majority of Americans favor outlawing the attachment, according to the latest NPR/Ipsos poll. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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Vince Warner fires an AK-47 with a bump stock installed at Good Guys Gun and Range in Utah. A significant majority of Americans favor outlawing the attachment, according to the latest NPR/Ipsos poll.

George Frey/Getty Images

An increasing number of Americans, both Republicans and Democrats, want more gun regulation, according to a new NPR/Ipsos poll that surveyed people in the aftermath of the Parkland school shooting.

Three-quarters of people polled said gun laws should be stricter than they are today. That's an increase — in a short period of time — from October 2017, when NPR conducted a similar survey in the wake of the Las Vegas shooting. Then, 68 percent said gun laws should be stricter than they were.

Read More from NPR HERE

You can also view the full survey HERE

All results are attributable to NPR/Ipsos


Key Findings:

  • 94% support requiring background checks for all gun buyers
  • 82% favor raising the legal age to purchase a gun to 21
  • 81% support banning bump stocks
  • 78% say Congress needs to do more to address guns
  • 73% support banning high-capacity magazines that hold more than 10 rounds
  • 73% say gun violence is a public-health issue
  • 72% support banning assault-style weapons
  • 63% DISAGREE with the current ban on government funding for gun violence research
  • 59% OPPOSE training teachers to carry guns in schools and see it as the LEAST EFFECTIVE way to reduce gun violence in schools
  • Just 48% say the benefits of owning a gun outweigh the risks, down 5 points from October
  • Just 36% say the NRA represents the views of people like them, down 7 points from October
  • 66% say guns will be a strong or somewhat strong factor in their vote in November.
  • People are split 47% agree -46% disagree on whether the only way to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun.

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Ben Fishel

NPR Media Relations

Email: mediarelations@npr.org