NPR Interviews Chicago Police Superintendent In an interview airing on this evening's edition of All Things Considered, NPR's Ari Shapiro spoke with Eddie T. Johnson, Chicago's Police Superintendent.
NPR logo NPR Interviews Chicago Police Superintendent

NPR Interviews Chicago Police Superintendent

Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson (left) at a City Council meeting in 2016. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson (left) at a City Council meeting in 2016.

M. Spencer Green/AP

Thursday, August 9; Washington, D.C. – In an interview airing on this evening's edition of All Things Considered, NPR's Ari Shapiro spoke with Eddie T. Johnson, Chicago's Police Superintendent. Johnson revealed that arrests have been made in connection with the string of deadly shootings that rocked the city last weekend. More than 70 people were shot, 12 of them fatally.

Stations and broadcast times are available at NPR.org/stations.

Excerpts of the interview are available below and can be cited with attribution to NPR. A full transcript will be made available after the interview has aired. Audio clips are available upon request, please email mediarelations@npr.org.

On the recent deadly shootings;
"We have made some arrests. We have some great leads, so we're still looking at some things and hopefully, you know, we'll bring some more individuals in."

But Johnson says the police department must repair its relationship with the majority black communities in Chicago's West and South sides to meaningfully reduce violence plaguing those neighborhoods.

Johnson became the city's superintendent in 2016. In recent days, he and other city officials have asked the community to work with police to diminish the violence. He reiterated those requests to All Things Considered.

On community trust with the police;
"The Chicago Police Department is only as good as the faith that the community has in it. If we have certain parts of the city that don't trust the police, these are the things that are going to happen. So we just have to repair those relationships because the police shouldn't be seen as an occupying force, they should be seen as partners in the community. Because at the end of the day a lot of them live in those communities. It's all of our responsibility, the police department, elected officials, the clergy, and the people that live in those communities. We all have a role to play in reducing violence."

Johnson agreed with and disputed Reverend Ira Acree's criticism of law enforcement on today's Morning Edition. Acree said residents were fearful to report criminals to the police because they know the CPD's homicide clearance rates are low and there is no witness protection program.

On Reverend Acree's criticism;
"Yeah, well, you know what, he's right in that the clearance rate isn't what we want it to be. But that's incorrect in terms of there's no witness protection. We work with the State's Attorney's Office every day to ensure that if people do come forward, and they are in fear, that we give them protection. So we do have that in place in Chicago."

Contact:
Ben Fishel, NPR Media Relations
Email: mediarelations (at) npr.org