NPR News Interviews Professor Anita Hill NPR's Mary Louise Kelly spoke with Professor Anita Hill about the accusations made against U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.
NPR logo NPR News Interviews Professor Anita Hill

NPR News Interviews Professor Anita Hill

Anita Hill testified in 1991 that she was sexually harassed by then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas. Anonymous/AP hide caption

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Anita Hill testified in 1991 that she was sexually harassed by then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas.

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Tuesday, September 25; Washington, D.C. - In an interview airing on this evening's edition of All Things Considered, NPR's Mary Louise Kelly spoke with Professor Anita Hill about the accusations made against U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh by Christine Blasey Ford. Ms. Hill discussed the similarities she faced in the 1991 when she brought forward accusation of sexual harassment against U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas.

Excerpts of the interview are available below and can be cited with attribution to NPR. A full transcript will be made available after the interview has aired. Audio clips are available upon request.

When asked if the hearing - as planned - will provide a fair and thorough account of what may or may not have happened 36 years ago, Ms. Hill said;
"It cannot be fair and thorough, it cannot provide not only the Senators with enough information to reach a reasonable conclusion, but it can't provide the public with the kind of information that it will need to understand the significance of these charges as well as the likelihood this occurred in the way Dr Blasey Ford has described it."

When discussing the personal cost of choosing to come forward with a public allegation, Ms. Hill said;
"Well we've seen that Dr. Blasey Ford has already been threatened, her family has been threatened. That's certainly the highest cost when you consider that your children are being threatened. I didn't have children but my family was threatened, along with me. My friends were threatened. Anybody who dared support me were also threatened with loss of life, loss of job. You lose privacy, but in the end, for me, what it has come down to is that I felt I had an obligation to come forward, I felt that I had relevant information about the character and fitness of the nominee... I had an obligation to the truth and I had an obligation as a member of the bar to the court, and so I gave up a lot but I still did what I believed was in the best interest of court, my own best interest, my personal best interest..."

When asked if she regrets coming forward, and how it defined her life, Ms. Hill said;
"No, I do not regret coming forward. And yes, it is true that it's redefined my life in many ways, but in the end I still have the power to define who I am and what my life stands for."

The full interview airs on today's All Things Considered.

Read More: Anita Hill Says Kavanaugh Accuser Hearing 'Cannot Be Fair'

Contact:
Ben Fishel, NPR Media Relations
Email: mediarelations (at) npr.org