NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll on Brett Kavanaugh A new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll reveals how Americans feel about the nomination of Brett Kavanaug
NPR logo NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll on Brett Kavanaugh

NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll on Brett Kavanaugh

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 6, the third day of his Supreme Court confirmation hearing. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 6, the third day of his Supreme Court confirmation hearing.

Alex Wong/Getty Images

A new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll reveals how Americans feel about the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court, their belief in the accusations made against him, and how the proceeding may impact their vote.

Read more from NPR HERE

Findings are attributable to NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist

Key findings:

  • 58% of Americans plan to pay attention to the proceedings if both Dr. Ford and Judge Kavanaugh testify.
  • 43% of Americans oppose the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh, 38% support him, and 19% are on the fence
  • 47% of those who have closely watched the proceedings support Kavanaugh's nomination, 45% do not.
  • 83% of Republicans support the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh, 12% are unsure
  • 77% of Democrats oppose the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh, 13% are unsure
  • 42% of Independents support the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh, 41% do not, 17% are unsure
  • 45% of men support the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh
  • 47% of women oppose the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh
  • 42% of Americans are unsure if they believe Brett Kavanaugh or his accuser, 32% believe Dr. Ford's story while 26% find Judge Kavanaugh's account credible
  • 32% of men believe Kavanaugh's account, 28% believe Ford.
  • 35% of women believe Ford's account, 20% believe Kavanaugh.
  • 59% of Americans say the Senate should not confirm Kavanaugh if Ford's allegations prove to be true, 29% believe he should be confirmed regardless, 12% are unsure
  • 54% of Republicans believe Kavanaugh should be confirmed even if the accusations prove to be true
  • 37% of voters say they are more likely to support a candidate who opposes the Kavanaugh nomination, 32% are more likely to vote for a candidate who supports it, 27% of voters say the appointment of Kavanaugh does not make a difference to their vote

Contact:
Ben Fishel, NPR Media Relations
Email: mediarelations (at) npr.org