NPR News Interviews Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu NPR's Steve Inskeep spoke with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu about his close alliance with President Trump and its effect on tensions between Israel and Palestine.
NPR logo NPR News Interviews Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu

NPR News Interviews Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu attends the weekly cabinet meeting at his office in Jerusalem on July 15. Ronen Zvulun/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ronen Zvulun/AP

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu attends the weekly cabinet meeting at his office in Jerusalem on July 15.

Ronen Zvulun/AP

Friday, September 28; Washington, D.C. - In an interview airing on Monday's Morning Edition, NPR's Steve Inskeep spoke with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu about his close alliance with President Trump and the U.S. President's support of a two-state solution.

Excerpts of the interview are available below and can be cited with attribution to NPR. A full transcript will be made available after the interview has aired. Audio clips are available upon request.

On President Trump recently endorsing a two-state solution, and whether that can occur under Netanyahu's watch;
"My view of a potential agreement is that the Palestinians have all the powers to govern themselves but none of the powers to threaten us. The key power that must, must not be in their hands is the question of security. In the tiny area west of the Jordan river up to the Mediterranean, it's all about the width of about 50 to 60 kilometers, 40 miles, where both Palestinians and Israelis live, Israel must retain the overriding security responsibility."

On whether he is ready to absorb Palestinians and give them full civil and voting rights, equal rights in Israel;
"No, I don't want them either as citizens of Israel or subjects of Israel. But I think there is not an either-or model. I think we have a third model at the very least which is what I'm talking about: basically all the powers of sovereignty, or nearly all the powers, but not the ones of security. Look, in the Middle East, which is littered with failed states, that's often the best you can do."

(...)

"Well, they would have those rights in their own territory. In other words, they have their own Parliament, they have their own government, they have their own flag, they have their own anthem, they have their own tax system."

On whether his close alliance with President Trump risks the historic bipartisan support for Israel in the United States.
"Well, I think that you know you've seen that we can have agreements and disagreements with previous administrations. For example, it's no secret I had a disagreement with President Obama on Iran. But at the same time, we signed MOU. And the MOU, the Memorandum of Understanding, guaranteed Israel very important American security assistance for the coming decade. And I appreciate that. So we can have disagreements and yet have a basic agreement about the importance of our alliance. And I don't have a disagreement with President Trump on Iran."

Contact:
Ben Fishel, NPR Media Relations
Email: mediarelations (at) npr.org