Marian Anderson Marian Anderson artist page: interviews, features and/or performances archived at NPR Music
Marian Anderson

Marian Anderson

Turning the Tables at Lincoln Center NPR hide caption

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NPR

Turning The Tables: Celebrating Eight Women Who Invented American Popular Music

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Marian Anderson's story reveals a longstanding legacy of black women amplifying black women's perspectives through the politics of concert performance. Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Marian Anderson is known more for two events than for the talents that made them possible. But there is more to be told, and so she asks us to listen again for who and what we know her to be. © Yousuf Karsh/http://karsh.org hide caption

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© Yousuf Karsh/http://karsh.org

Marian Anderson sings at the Lincoln Memorial, 1939. Even as her mink coat might have served practical purposes, it was also richly symbolic. Bettmann/Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann/Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

An undated portrait of America contralto Marian Anderson at her home. London Express/Getty Images hide caption

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London Express/Getty Images

Marian Anderson: The Most Modest Trailblazer

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Turning The Tables: 8 Women Who Invented American Popular Music Chelsea Beck for NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Beck for NPR

Hear a conversation about the third season of Turning the Tables on Morning Edition

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Contralto Marian Anderson in the role of Ulrica from a Metropolitan Opera production of Verdi's Un ballo en maschera in 1955. Anderson was the first African-American soloist to appear at the Met. Sedge LeBlang/Metropolitan Opera Archives hide caption

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Sedge LeBlang/Metropolitan Opera Archives

Marian Anderson's Groundbreaking Met Opera Moment

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Contralto Marian Anderson sang at the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, April 9, 1939, to an estimated crowd of 75,000 people. University of Pennsylvania hide caption

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University of Pennsylvania

Denied A Stage, She Sang For A Nation

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Marian Anderson broke the color barrier at the Metropolitan Opera in 1955 when she starred in Verdi's Un Ballo in Maschera. Sony Classical Archives hide caption

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Sony Classical Archives

Re dell'abisso, affrettati

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The Victor Orchestra crowds around an enormous horn for an early acoustical recording session. courtesy of Recorded Sound Section, MBRS Division, Library of Congress hide caption

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courtesy of Recorded Sound Section, MBRS Division, Library of Congress