George Clinton George Clinton artist page: interviews, features and/or performances archived at NPR Music

George Clinton

Eblis Alvaraez (Meridian Brothers) and Iván Medellin (Conjunto Media Luna) have one of the albums featured this week. Courtesy of the Artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the Artist

Alt. Latino's Fall Music Preview

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George Clinton and Parliament-Funkadelic, May 1971 Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

The Culture Corner: George Clinton

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Funkadelic is the result of George Clinton flirting with psychedelic music, a style he describes as "loud R&B." Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Funkadelic's 'Maggot Brain' At 50: R&B, Psychedelic Rock And A Black Guitarist's Cry

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With his band Parliament Funkadelic, George Clinton paved the way for generations of free-spirited musicians who came after him. Erika Goldring/Getty Images hide caption

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Erika Goldring/Getty Images

Play It Forward: George Clinton Is Everyone's Hype Man

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George Clinton circa 1970 Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

The Black Roots of Rock and Roll Part 2 on World Cafe

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Killer Mike (left) and George Clinton met up in The SWAG Shop, the barbershop Killer Mike owns in Atlanta. Cameron Robert/NPR hide caption

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Cameron Robert/NPR

George Clinton And Killer Mike: Talking (Barber) Shop

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George Clinton, Still Radiating the Funk

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George Clinton emerges from Parliament-Funkadelic's Mothership on June 4, 1977, at the Coliseum in Los Angeles. Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Well, All Right, Starchild, The Mothership Is Back

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A contemporary Clinton sans dreadlocks. William Thoren hide caption

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William Thoren

George Clinton Fights For His Right To Funk

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