John Coltrane John Coltrane artist page: interviews, features and/or performances archived at NPR Music

John Coltrane

John Coltrane during the recording of A Love Supreme in December 1964. Chuck Stewart/Courtesy of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History hide caption

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Chuck Stewart/Courtesy of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History

Christian McBride On 'A Love Supreme' And Its Descendants

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John Coltrane during the recording of A Love Supreme in December 1964. Chuck Stewart/Courtesy of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History hide caption

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Chuck Stewart/Courtesy of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History

50 Years Of John Coltrane's 'A Love Supreme'

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John Coltrane during the recording of A Love Supreme in December 1964. Chuck Stewart/Courtesy of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History hide caption

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Chuck Stewart/Courtesy of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History

The gospel/folk singer Sister Rosetta Tharpe was accompanied by a jazz orchestra on her debut recording. Chris Ware/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Ware/Getty Images

From coffeehouses to punk clubs, Matt Haimovitz has played his cello in some surprising places. Steph Mackinnon hide caption

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Steph Mackinnon

Last year, the National Trust for Historic Preservation put the Coltrane Home on a list of the 11 most endangered historic sites in the United States. Now, a group of fans and family has set out to restore it. Courtesy of the National Trust for Historic Preservation hide caption

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Courtesy of the National Trust for Historic Preservation

Making A Home For John Coltrane's Legacy

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Saxophonist Ravi Coltrane is the son of jazz icons John and Alice Coltrane. His new album Spirit Fiction was released June 19. Deborah Feingold/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Deborah Feingold/Courtesy of the artist

At Home With The Coltranes, Listening To Stravinsky

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John Coltrane. Evening Standard/Getty Images hide caption

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Evening Standard/Getty Images

The Story Of 'A Love Supreme'

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Verve

Dave Liebman. Chuck Koton hide caption

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Chuck Koton

Crescent

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Jaleel Shaw. courtesy of the artist hide caption

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courtesy of the artist

Impressions

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John Coltrane's rapid stylistic evolution was not always admired as it is today: One critic called a 1961 performance "anti-jazz," and the label stuck with his detractors. Jan Persson/Courtesy of Concord Music Group hide caption

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Jan Persson/Courtesy of Concord Music Group

John Coltrane: Saxophone Icon, Pt. 2

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During multiple stints with Miles Davis' groups of the 1950s and early '60s, John Coltrane began to develop his signature sound. Evening Standard/Getty Images hide caption

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Evening Standard/Getty Images

John Coltrane: Saxophone Icon, Pt. 1

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