Abba ABBA artist page: interviews, features and/or performances archived at NPR Music

Abba

Björn Ulvaeus, Agnetha Fältskog, Anni-Frid Lyngstad, and Benny Andersson of ABBA. ABBA's new album Voyage is out now. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

ABBA, on stage at Paramount Theater in Portland. The group's new album, Voyage is out Nov. 5. Bettmann/Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

ABBA is back with new music and plans for a high-tech stage show

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Members of the Swedish group ABBA are seen on a display during a Voyage event at Grona Lund, Stockholm, on September 2. The band is delaying the release of a promotional video after two people died and one was injured at a tribute concert near Stockholm on Tuesday. Frederik Persson/TT News Agency/AFP via Getty Ima hide caption

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Frederik Persson/TT News Agency/AFP via Getty Ima

Electric Waterloo: (L to R) Young Tanya (Jessica Keenan Wynn), Young Donna (Lily James) and Young Rosie (Alexa Davies) feel the beat from the tambourine, oh yeah, in Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again. Jonathan Prime/Universal Pictures hide caption

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Jonathan Prime/Universal Pictures

The tragedy in Orlando compels us to consider and celebrate spaces of gay Latin pride — especially the dance floor. Monika Graff/Getty Images hide caption

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Monika Graff/Getty Images

'I Feel Like I'm Free When I'm Dancing There': Love And Pride On The Dance Floor

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Natalia Clavier. /Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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/Courtesy of the artist

Getting Personal With Alt.Latino Guest DJ Natalia Clavier

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The members of ABBA (from left): Bjorn Ulvaeus, Agnetha Faltskog, Anni-Frid Lyngstad and Benny Andersson at Waterloo station in London in 1974, the year the group won the Eurovision contest with the song "Waterloo." John Downing/Getty Images hide caption

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John Downing/Getty Images