The Chicks The Chicks artist page: interviews, features and/or performances archived at NPR Music

The Chicks

The Chicks Philippa Price/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Philippa Price/Courtesy of the artist

The Chicks On World Cafe

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Blu & Exile. Their new project, Miles: From An Interlude Called Life, is on our shortlist of the best albums out on July 17. Zack Mack/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Zack Mack/Courtesy of the artist

New Music Friday: The Top 8 Albums Out On July 17

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"I feel like it was better for the longevity of this band, believe it or not, to have gone through something like that," Emily Strayer says of The Chicks' cancellation. "It makes you even stronger." Philippa Price/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Philippa Price/Courtesy of the artist

The Chicks Look Back And Laugh

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From its brash title track to a denouement that begs to be set free, Gaslighter — The Chicks' first album in 14 years — is a story of painful awakening. Betsy Whitney/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Betsy Whitney/Courtesy of the artist

Rihanna performs with Pharrell Williams at her fifth annual Diamond Ball on Sept. 12, 2019. This January marks four years since her last full-length release. Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images hide caption

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Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images

From Dixie Chicks To Rihanna: Our Music Predictions For 2020

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Emily Strayer, Natalie Maines, and Martie Maguire of the Dixie Chicks perform onstage on June 1, 2016, for the DCX World Tour MMXVI Opener. The tour stopped in Nashville Wednesday. Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for PMK hide caption

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Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for PMK

Mother is the solo debut of Natalie Maines, former Dixie Chicks frontwoman. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Natalie Maines On Motherhood, Eddie Vedder And Leaving Country Music

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Dixie Chicks Return, 'Taking the Long Way'

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Natalie Maines of the Dixie Chicks got herself and the band in a tizzy when she said, "Just so you know, we're ashamed the president of the United States is from Texas," in 2003. Frank Micelotta/Getty Images Entertainment hide caption

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Frank Micelotta/Getty Images Entertainment

Eight Years Gone

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