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Bobby Hutcherson.

Bobby Hutcherson

Toots Thielemans. Jos Knaepen hide caption

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Jos Knaepen

Toots Thielemans onstage at the North Sea Jazz Festival in the Netherlands in 2005. Rick Nederstigt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rick Nederstigt/AFP/Getty Images

As 2016 Winds Down, Remembering The Jazz Giants We Lost

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Bobby Hutcherson's new album on Blue Note Records is Enjoy The View. Scott Chernis/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Scott Chernis/Courtesy of the artist

Bobby Hutcherson's Good Vibes For Fiery Times

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Chick Corea (keyboard) joined the SFJAZZ Collective for the closing performance, an arrangement of his piece "Spain." Scott Chernis/Courtesy of SFJAZZ Center hide caption

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Scott Chernis/Courtesy of SFJAZZ Center

Agalloch and Ludicra drummer Aesop Dekker says he thinks Bobby Hutcherson is a sorcerer. Ross Sewage/Courtesy of Profound Lore hide caption

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Ross Sewage/Courtesy of Profound Lore

Bobby Hutcherson. Andrew Lepley hide caption

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Andrew Lepley

"Key Largo" from Sarah Vaughan, Sarah +2 (Capitol/Blue Note). Originally released 1962.

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The 2010 NEA Jazz Masters. Clockwise, from upper left: Cedar Walton, Kenny Barron, Yusef Lateef, George Avakian, Bobby Hutcherson, Annie Ross, Muhal Richard Abrams, Bill Holman (center). clockwise from upper left: Gene Martin, Carol Friedman, Michael DiDonna, Ian P. Clifford, Francis Wolff/Mosaic Images, Barbara Bordnick, Alan Nahigian, William Claxton hide caption

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clockwise from upper left: Gene Martin, Carol Friedman, Michael DiDonna, Ian P. Clifford, Francis Wolff/Mosaic Images, Barbara Bordnick, Alan Nahigian, William Claxton

Lionel Hampton was the first musician to use the vibraphone on a jazz recording. Reg Davis/Getty Images hide caption

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Reg Davis/Getty Images