Kendrick Lamar Kendrick Lamar artist page: interviews, features and/or performances archived at NPR Music

Kendrick Lamar

"New Beyoncé is literally good for everybody in the world," Maggie Rogers says of Renaissance, which shares a release date with her own Surrender. "I'm so excited for this record." Olivia Bee/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Olivia Bee/Courtesy of the artist

NPR Music's best music of May includes (from top left, clockwise) Kendrick Lamar, Bad Bunny, Julia Reidy, Ravyn Lenae and Ethel Cain. Courtesy of the artists hide caption

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Courtesy of the artists

NPR's favorite music of May, from a San Benito summer to an uneasy opus

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Kendrick Lamar performs in March 2019 during the third day of Lollapalooza Buenos Airesat Hipodromo de San Isidro. Santiago Bluguermann/Getty Images hide caption

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Santiago Bluguermann/Getty Images

Kendrick Lamar's new song 'Auntie Diaries' divides the LGBTQ+ community

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Kendrick Lamar returns with his latest album, Mr. Morale & The Big Steppers. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Mr. Morale & the Big Steppers is the first album from Kendrick Lamar since DAMN., the 2017 release that made him the first rapper to win a Pulitzer Prize. Renell Medrano/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Renell Medrano/Courtesy of the artist

Kendrick Lamar's Mr. Morale & The Big Steppers tops this week's shortlist for the best albums out on May 13. Renell Medrano/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Renell Medrano/Courtesy of the artist

New Music Friday: The best releases out on May 13

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Lil Baby performs during a Juneteenth voter registration rally on June 19, 2020 at Murphy Park Fairgrounds in Atlanta, Ga. One week earlier, he released "The Bigger Picture," a song protesting police brutality. Paras Griffin/Getty Images hide caption

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Paras Griffin/Getty Images

Kendrick Lamar in 2013. "Money Trees," from Lamar's 2012 album, good kid, m.A.A.d city, is a song "that consumes the oxygen and alters the ultra-violet," writes Jeff Weiss. Imeh Akpanudosen/Getty Images hide caption

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Imeh Akpanudosen/Getty Images

Kendrick Lamar performs at the 2017 Coachella festival. Though his 2015 album To Pimp A Butterfly wore its jazz influence on its sleeve, 2017's DAMN. displays Lamar's deep investment in the way jazz can evolve. Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images

Julie Byrne on the cover of 2017's Not Even Happiness. Her song "Natural Blue" begins our playlist of soothing music. Courtesy of Ba Da Bing! Records hide caption

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Courtesy of Ba Da Bing! Records

Isle Of Calm: Stream 6 Hours Of Soothing Music

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Rihanna performs with Pharrell Williams at her fifth annual Diamond Ball on Sept. 12, 2019. This January marks four years since her last full-length release. Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images hide caption

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Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images

From Dixie Chicks To Rihanna: Our Music Predictions For 2020

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Pianist and producer Robert Glasper has spent much of the past decade reconnecting jazz with popular black music, transforming the work of artists like rapper Kendrick Lamar, Flying Lotus and Brittany Howard. Peter Van Breukelen/Redferns/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Van Breukelen/Redferns/Getty Images

The 2010s: A Jazz Revival In Black Music

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