Beyonce Beyoncé artist page: interviews, features and/or performances archived at NPR Music

Beyonce

Beyoncé's Cowboy Carter has ignited discourse about the place of Black musicians in country music. But it's also evidence of its creator's desire to break genre walls by following her most eccentric impulses. Mason Poole/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Mason Poole/Courtesy of the artist

Beyoncé's voice is the real star of Cowboy Carter as she sets out to prove, once and for all, that she can hold it down in any genre she damn well pleases. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Beyoncé returns with her highly anticipated new album Cowboy Carter. Blair Caldwell/Parkwood Entertainment / Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Blair Caldwell/Parkwood Entertainment / Courtesy of the artist

Melba Pattillo Beals, 82, went on to receive a master's degree from Columbia University and a doctoral degree at the University of San Francisco. USF Office of Marketing Communications hide caption

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USF Office of Marketing Communications

Cowboy Carter is the hotly anticipated follow-up to to Beyoncé's 2022 album, Renaissance. Blair Caldwell/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Blair Caldwell/Courtesy of the artist

10 takeaways from Beyoncé's new album, 'Cowboy Carter'

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Courtesy of the artist

New Music Friday: The best albums out March 29

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Beyoncé and Jay-Z attend the 66th Grammy Awards at Los Angeles' Crypto.com Arena on Feb. 4, 2024. Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for The Recording Academy hide caption

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Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for The Recording Academy

The cover photo from "Texas Hold 'Em," one of two new country singles by Beyoncé that debuted during Super Bowl LVIII. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Beyoncé is getting played on country radio. Could her success help other Black women?

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Beyoncé watches Jay-Z as he accepts the Dr. Dre Global Impact Award during the 66th Grammy Awards on Feb. 4. Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for The Recording Academy hide caption

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Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for The Recording Academy

Beyoncé accepts the Best Dance/Electronic Music Album award for "Renaissance" onstage during the 65th GRAMMY Awards atCrypto.com Arena on February 05, 2023 in Los Angeles, California. Frazer Harrison/Getty Images hide caption

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Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

Jay-Z (left) accepts the honorary Dr. Dre Global Impact Award alongside his daughter, Blue Ivy Carter, during the 66th Grammy Awards on Sunday, Feb. 4, 2024, in Los Angeles. Kevin Winter/Getty Images for The Recording Academy hide caption

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Kevin Winter/Getty Images for The Recording Academy

Beyoncé accepts the Best Dance/Electronic Music Album award for "Renaissance" onstage during the 65th Grammy Awards on Feb. 5 in Los Angeles. Kevin Winter/Getty Images for The Recording Academy hide caption

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Kevin Winter/Getty Images for The Recording Academy

Beyoncé performs during the MTV Video Music Awards in August 2014, at the Forum in Inglewood, Calif. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

10 years later, the 'Beyoncé' surprise drop still offers lessons about control

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Renaissance: A Film by Beyoncé is both concert film and documentary about the recent world tour. Parkwood Entertainment hide caption

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Parkwood Entertainment

For Beyoncé's Renaissance tour Es Devlin designed a spherical portal — a 50-foot wide aperture — from which the star, her dancers and musicians could emerge and withdraw between songs. Es Devlin/Thames & Hudson hide caption

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Es Devlin/Thames & Hudson

When stars are on stage, this designer makes it personal for each fan in the stadium

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Jon Hetherington, 34, from Oregon, originally planned to attend the Seattle show of Beyoncé's Renaissance World Tour, but couldn't fly because his wheelchair exceeded the plane's cargo dimensions. He posted about the saga on TikTok and a representative for Beyoncé arranged for him to attend her Dallas show. Jon Hetherington hide caption

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Jon Hetherington

Beyoncé performs onstage during her Renaissance World Tour at PGE Narodowy in Warsaw, Poland. Kevin Mazur/WireImage for Parkwood / Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Mazur/WireImage for Parkwood / Getty Images

This summer, three women at the peak of their powers lead a spectacular pop culture revival. Beyoncé, left, performs onstage during the Renaissance World Tour in May 2023. Margot Robbie stars in Greta Gerwig's Barbie movie. And Taylor Swift performs during The Eras Tour in March 2023. Kevin Mazur/WireImage for Parkwood/Getty Images; Warner Bros. Pictures; John Medina/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Mazur/WireImage for Parkwood/Getty Images; Warner Bros. Pictures; John Medina/Getty Images

How three female artists lead this summer's billion-dollar pop culture revival

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