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Aaron Taylor-Johnson and Brad Pitt in a scene from the film Bullet Train. Sony Pictures hide caption

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Sony Pictures

Will her bike wind up in that canal? AURORE BELOT/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AURORE BELOT/AFP via Getty Images

Why do so many bikes end up underwater? The reasons can be weird and varied

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A bag of assorted pills and prescription drugs is dropped off for disposal during the Drug Enforcement Administration's National Prescription Drug Take Back Day on April 24, 2021 in Los Angeles. Patrick T. Falon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Falon/AFP via Getty Images

New book chronicles how America's opioid industry operated like a drug cartel

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PEN literary service award recipient Stephen King attends the 2018 PEN Literary Gala at the American Museum of Natural History on May 22, 2018, in New York. Evan Agostini/Evan Agostini/Invision/AP hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

FILE - A sign urges the release of the monkeypox vaccine during a protest in San Francisco, July 18, 2022. (AP Photo/Haven Daley, File) Haven Daley/AP hide caption

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Haven Daley/AP

Why protecting the 'viral underclass' can keep us all healthy

After years of covering HIV and AIDS, journalist Steven Thrasher knew that the hardest hit communities were almost always the poorest and most marginalized ones. Then COVID-19 struck, and he saw that the same groups of people were suffering the most.

Why protecting the 'viral underclass' can keep us all healthy

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Poet Alora Young. Sonya Smith/Penguin Random House hide caption

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Sonya Smith/Penguin Random House

In a new memoir in verse, Alora Young traces the lives of generations of Black women

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Valeriy Kachaev/Spruce Books

How to know when you spend too much time online and need to log off

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Many of Megan Miranda's thrillers make nature — the deep woods or a steep trail — a central and often menacing character. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

How do you write a captivating thriller? This author found clues in the woods

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Penguin Random House

The immersive novel 'Tomorrow' is a winner for gamers and n00bs alike

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Briana Scurry blocks a penalty shootout during overtime of the Women's World Cup Final against China at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Calif., July 10, 1999. The U.S. team won 5-4 on penalties. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

A brain injury cut short Briana Scurry's soccer career. It didn't end her story

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Jon Auvil, center, receives an Ernest Hemingway bust and congratulations after he won the 2022 Hemingway Look-Alike Contest at Sloppy Joe's Bar in Key West, Fla. Left of Auvil is Joe Maxey, the 2019 winner, and at right is Fred Johnson, who won in 1986. It was Auvil's eighth attempt in the annual contest. Andy Newman/Florida Keys News Bureau via AP hide caption

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Andy Newman/Florida Keys News Bureau via AP

Jaquel Spivey and the cast of "A Strange Loop" perform at the 75th annual Tony Awards on June 12 at Radio City Music Hall in New York. Charles Sykes/Invision/AP hide caption

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Charles Sykes/Invision/AP

Sir Mark Lowcock, the former head of the U.N.'s Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, has written a memoir, Relief Chief: A Manifesto for Saving Lives in Dire Times. In 2017, he was appointed Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath for his work in international development. Thierry Roge/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Thierry Roge/AFP via Getty Images

Ottessa Moshfegh's new book, Lapvona, is her most gruesome and graphic work to date. Andrew Casey/Courtesy of Penguin Random House hide caption

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Andrew Casey/Courtesy of Penguin Random House

Ottessa Moshfegh's year of death and internet clout

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The San Antonio Soldados and the Kansas City Stampede face off during the 2021 regular Major League Quidditch season last July in Round Rock, Texas. The league and the sport's governing bodies announced on Tuesday that the sport is rebranding as quadball. Major League Quidditch hide caption

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Major League Quidditch

Quidditch rebrands as quadball and further distances itself from Harry Potter author

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Ingrid Rojas Contreras. Jamil Hellu/Doubleday hide caption

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Jamil Hellu/Doubleday

A head injury gave Ingrid amnesia. Then came the journey to rediscover her history

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There's a lingering mystery hanging over the author of "Where the Crawdads Sing," now adapted into a film. Michele K. Short/Sony Pictures hide caption

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Michele K. Short/Sony Pictures

Questions linger over 'Where the Crawdads Sing' author as film adaptation is released

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