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A farmer works at an avocado plantation at the Los Cerritos avocado group ranch in Ciudad Guzman, state of Jalisco, Mexico. Ulises Ruiz/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ulises Ruiz/AFP via Getty Images

This data scientist has a plan for how to feed the world sustainably

According to the United Nations, about ten percent of the world is undernourished. It's a daunting statistic — unless your name is Hannah Ritchie. She's the data scientist behind the new book Not the End of the World: How We Can Be the First Generation to Build a Sustainable Planet. It's a seriously big thought experiment: How do we feed everyone on Earth sustainably? And because it's just as much an economically pressing question as it is a scientific one, Darian Woods of The Indicator from Planet Money joins us. With Hannah's help, Darian unpacks how to meet the needs of billions of people without destroying the planet.

This data scientist has a plan for how to feed the world sustainably

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The idea that sentences can end with a preposition has become a point of contention in the replies to a tongue-in-cheek social media post from dictionary publisher Merriam-Webster. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Merriam-Webster says you can end a sentence with a preposition. The internet goes off

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Cognitive neuroscientist Charan Ranganath says the human brain isn't programmed to remember everything. Rather, it's designed to "carry what we need and to deploy it rapidly when we need it." Bulat Silvia/iStock / Getty Images Plus hide caption

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Bulat Silvia/iStock / Getty Images Plus

When is forgetting normal — and when is it worrisome? A neuroscientist weighs in

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Bloomsbury Publishing

Dishy-yet-earnest, 'Cocktails' revisits the making of 'Virginia Woolf'

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Lucy Sante, shown here in January 2024, says, "I am lucky to have survived my own repression. I think a lot of people in my position have not." Roy Rochlin/Getty Images for The Guardian hide caption

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Roy Rochlin/Getty Images for The Guardian

A gender-swapping photo app helped Lucy Sante come out as trans at age 67

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A secret shelf of banned books thrives in a Texas school, under the nose of censors

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Jada Pinkett Smith's creative life. Matt Winkelmeyer/Paul Hawthorne/Getty Images hide caption

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Alicia Zheng/NPR

4 habits of highly effective communicators

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'Oscar Wars' spotlights bias, blind spots and backstage battles in the Academy

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Penguin Random House

You'll savor the off-beat mysteries served up by 'The Kamogawa Food Detectives'

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Author and cultural critic bell hooks poses for a portrait on December 16, 1996 in New York City, New York. Karjean Levine/Getty Images hide caption

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LA Johnson/NPR

The secret to lasting love might just be knowing how to fight

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A person dressed as Bigfoot makes their way through the snow during a blizzard in Boston in January 2015. John O'Connor's The Secret History of Bigfoot explores the myth and its lingering appeal. Kayana Szymczak/Getty Images hide caption

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Maurice Sendak delights children with new book, 12 years after his death

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