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Anne Frank's Diary: The Graphic Adaptation is one of more than 40 books being challenged in the Keller Independent School District. AFP Contributor/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP Contributor/AFP via Getty Images

Defense attorney Nathaniel Barone (left) and Hadi Matar, who was charged with stabbing author Salman Rushdie, listen during an arraignment Thursday in the Chautauqua County Courthouse in Mayville, N.Y. Joshua Bessex/AP hide caption

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Joshua Bessex/AP

Jewish townspeople of the village of Nasielsk, Poland in 1938. Family Affair Films, US Holocaust Memorial Museum hide caption

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Family Affair Films, US Holocaust Memorial Museum

'The Territory' and 'Three Minutes: A Lengthening' find cinematic hope in tragedy

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Patricia Highsmith in 1942, age 21. Rolf Tietgens, courtesy of Keith De Lellis hide caption

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Rolf Tietgens, courtesy of Keith De Lellis

Untangling the contradictions of crime novelist Patricia Highsmith

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Author Jamil Jan Kochai and his former second-grade teacher, Susan Lung, were reunited after more than 20 years at a reading for the writer's second book, The Haunting of Hajji Hotak and Other Stories, in Davis, California. Jamil Jan Kochai hide caption

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Jamil Jan Kochai

Philosopher William MacAskill coined the term "longtermism" to convey the idea that humans have a moral responsibility to protect the future of humanity, prevent it from going extinct and create a better future for many generations to come. He outlines this concept in his new book, What We Owe the Future. Matt Crockett hide caption

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Matt Crockett

Nuar Alsadir Joseph Robert Krauss/Graywolf Press hide caption

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Joseph Robert Krauss/Graywolf Press

A book on laughter and how it brings out our most authentic selves

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The award-winning novelist Chibundu Onuzo has lately been thinking about her life in London and her visits to Nigeria, where she was born: "What do I love most about my trips to Lagos? I lose my self-consciousness there. If I stand out, it's for something other than my skin color." David Levenson/Getty Images hide caption

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David Levenson/Getty Images

Author Salman Rushdie was attacked on stage as he was preparing for a speaking event in western New York on Friday. Grant Pollard/Invision/AP hide caption

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Grant Pollard/Invision/AP

Salman Rushdie off ventilator and talking after stabbing attack

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Mary Rodgers and Jesse Green, co-authors of Shy: The Alarmingly Outspoken Memoirs of Mary Rodgers Courtesy of the Rodgers-Beaty-Guettel family; Earl Wilson/New York Times hide caption

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Courtesy of the Rodgers-Beaty-Guettel family; Earl Wilson/New York Times

Published 8 years after her death, Mary Rodgers' memoir is a true tell-all book

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A photo of Joseph James DeAngelo Jr. is displayed during a news conference April 24, 2018, in Sacramento, Calif., announcing the arrest of the man suspected to be the so-called Golden State Killer. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

After a career of cracking cold cases, investigator Paul Holes opens up

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Penguin Random House

'The Last White Man' spins a deft, if narrow, fantasy about identity

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Tom Sturridge as Dream in Netflix's The Sandman. Liam Daniel/Netflix hide caption

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Liam Daniel/Netflix