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President Trump and H.R. McMaster walk toward Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, D.C., on June 16, 2017. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Bishop Michael Curry gave a sermon at the 2018 royal wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, at St. George's Chapel, in Windsor, England. Steve Parsons/Pool / Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Parsons/Pool / Getty Images

Bishop Michael Curry Preaches The Power Of Love To Find 'Hope In Troubling Times'

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In her new book, Modern Madness: An Owner's Manual, Terri Cheney, who lives with bipolar disorder, shares advice for dealing with anxiety and depression and helping loved ones through a crisis. Neha Gupta/Getty Images hide caption

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Neha Gupta/Getty Images

Karen Speros, 82, waits for a movie to start at a Regal movie theater in Irvine, Calif., Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Movie Industry Adapts, Plus LeVar Burton Reads

The movie industry is hurting. Most theaters in the U.S. are still shut down, and who knows when—or if—audiences will pack into theaters again. Adam B. Vary and Angelique Jackson of Variety talk about the state of the movie industry and how it's adapted, for better or worse, in this pandemic. Also, Sam talks to actor LeVar Burton about reading, why we like being read to, what he really wanted you to learn from Reading Rainbow, and the latest season of his podcast LeVar Burton Reads.

Movie Industry Adapts, Plus LeVar Burton Reads

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In his new book No Rules Rules, Reed Hastings attributes Netflix's success to the unorthodox office culture at the company. Hastings is pictured at Summit LA17 in Los Angeles in 2017. Amy Harris/Invision/AP hide caption

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Amy Harris/Invision/AP

Netflix CEO Embraces 'No Rules,' But Work Is Anything But Chill

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A collection of current and past presidential advertising materials hangs on a wall in the visitor center of the New Hampshire State House in Concord, N.H. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Collect Data, Influence Votes: 'If Then' Traces The Genesis Of Data-Driven Politics

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HarperCollins

A Widow Discovers That Her Marriage Wasn't 'Monogamy'

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Copies of The Room Where it Happened, a memoir by former national security adviser John Bolton, are seen at a Barnes & Noble bookstore in Glendale, Calif., in June. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

The House by the Lake: The True Story of a House, Its History, and the Four Families Who Made It Home, by Thomas Harding. Illustrated by Britta Teckentrup Candlewick Studio hide caption

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Candlewick Studio

Hastings Writes About Netflix's Cultural Reinvention In 'No Rules Rules'

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Bloomsbury Publishing

Home Sweet Labyrinth: Susanna Clarke's Mysterious 'Piranesi' Will Lock You In

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Ayad Akhtar won a Pulitzer Prize for Disgraced, his play about a conflicted American Muslim man living in New York after Sept. 11. Vincent Tullo/Little, Brown And Company hide caption

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Vincent Tullo/Little, Brown And Company

It's Real, It's Fiction, It's A Paradox: Ayad Akhtar On His 'Homeland Elegies'

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Journalist Bob Woodward, seen here in 2017 arriving for meetings with President-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in New York, is the author of the newly released book Rage. Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images

"We all have to work at making the immigrant story much more public," said Maria Hinojosa, author of a new memoir, Once I Was You: A Memoir of Love and Hate in a Torn America. Photo by Kevin Abosch hide caption

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Photo by Kevin Abosch

Journalist Maria Hinojosa Tells Latinos, Silenced Voices: 'We Need You'

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