Books: Book Reviews, Book News, and Author Interviews NPR's brings you news about books and authors along with our picks for great reads. Interviews, reviews, and much more.

Books

Author Julissa Arce makes the case for rejecting assimilation in her latest book, You Sound Like a White Girl. Aly Honore hide caption

toggle caption
Aly Honore

For author Julissa Arce, 'sounding white' isn't a compliment

Julissa Arce used to think that the secret to fitting in was to "sound white" — to speak English perfectly, with no accent. And for years after her family came to the U.S. from Mexico, she did all the things immigrants are "supposed" to do to assimilate: she went to college, got a job at Goldman Sachs and became an American citizen.

For author Julissa Arce, 'sounding white' isn't a compliment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1124466387/1125077701" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In November 1960, Ruby Bridges became the first Black child to desegregate the all-white William Frantz Elementary School in New Orleans. The six-year-old was escorted by four U.S. marshals. Uncredited/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Uncredited/AP

After Making History As A Child, Ruby Bridges Shares Her Story With Today's Kids

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1124748712/1125168999" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A novelist's time in the MMA cage informed his book on memory loss and identity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1125085933/1125134451" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Less is Lost, by Andrew Sean Greer Little, Brown hide caption

toggle caption
Little, Brown

'Less' offers more in Andrew Sean Greer's follow-up to his Pulitzer-winning novel

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1124704474/1125134454" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing

40 years after she took the stage, 'Angelina Ballerina' is still dancing

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1122951295/1124974271" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Monkey thieves, drunk elephants — Mary Roach reveals a weird world of animal 'crime'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1124700484/1124764284" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Saeed Jones/Saeed Jones

Saeed Jones confronts the end of the world in new poems

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1123050384/1124441206" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Edward Enninful became the editor-in-chief of British Vogue in 2017. His new memoir is A Visible Man. Rafael Pavarotti/Penguin Random House hide caption

toggle caption
Rafael Pavarotti/Penguin Random House

'British Vogue' editor-in-chief wants his magazine to reflect the world he sees

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1124073791/1124323474" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

Dear Life Kit: My husband wrote an 80-chapter book. Do I have to read it?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1122906461/1122953382" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop

3 common thinking traps and how to avoid them, according to a Yale psychologist

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1122660697/1122662567" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lisa McNair holds her memoir Dear Denise: Letters to the Sister I Never Knew, recounting growing up in Birmingham, Ala., after her sister Denise and three other Black girls were murdered in the Ku Klux Klan bombing of 16th Street Baptist Church. Taylor Jennings-Brown/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Taylor Jennings-Brown/NPR

Her sister was killed in the Birmingham church bombing. A new book tells their story

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1122437660/1123042562" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Simon & Schuster

Nina Totenberg looks back on her decades-long friendship with Ruth Bader Ginsburg

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1122367921/1122978210" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
MacMillan

Ling Ma's first novel predicted the pandemic. Her new collection goes one step beyond

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1122539180/1122977383" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript