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Mat Johnson is the Philip H. Knight Chair of Humanities at the University of Oregon. His previous books include Pym and Loving Day. Courtesy of University of Oregon hide caption

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Courtesy of University of Oregon

Real life or satire? Novelist Mat Johnson says it can be hard to tell the difference

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John Vercher is the author of the novels Three-Fifths and After the Lights Go Out. Karen Maria Photography/Soho Press hide caption

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Karen Maria Photography/Soho Press

A novelist's time in the MMA cage informed his book on memory loss and identity

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Lapvona, by Ottessa Moshfegh Penguin Random House hide caption

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Penguin Random House

Life in the Middle Ages is more gross than engrossing in this ruthless novel

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Fasten your seat belts, flight attendant-turned-novelist shares stories from the sky

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A dolphin's sense of echolocation allows it to coordinate efforts to hunt prey, see "through" other creatures and form three-dimensional shapes using sound. Raymond Roig/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Raymond Roig/AFP via Getty Images

The human sensory experience is limited. Journey into the world that animals know

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Fourth-grader Lucy Kramer (foreground) does schoolwork at her home, as her mother, Daisley, helps her younger sister, Meg, who is in kindergarten, in 2020 in San Anselmo, Calif. Ezra Shaw/Getty Images hide caption

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Ezra Shaw/Getty Images

Raising kids is 'Essential Labor.' It's also lonely, exhausting and expensive

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Attempts to ban books in school districts around the country have increased in recent years. Now, some states are working on enacting laws to give politicians more power over public libraries. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Some states are changing the laws that govern community libraries

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Kaitlyn Tiffany, author of Everything I Need, I Get From You: How Fangirls Shaped the Internet as We Know It. Amelia Holowaty Krales/FSG Books hide caption

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Amelia Holowaty Krales/FSG Books

Fangirls rule the internet in 'Everything I Need, I Get From You'

Fangirls often don't get taken seriously in pop culture. But in her new book, Everything I Need, I Get From You: How Fangirls Created the Internet as We Know It, culture reporter Kaitlyn Tiffany explores just how much fangirls have shaped online life. She talks with guest host B.A. Parker about how fans used Tumblr to transform internet culture, how being a One Direction fan enriched her own life and why fandom is more complicated than we might think.

Fangirls rule the internet in 'Everything I Need, I Get From You'

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Julie Andrews sang "The hills are alive" in the film version of The Sound of Music, but Hammerstein's letters reveal that a much bigger Hollywood star had lobbied hard to play Maria. Alamy Stock Photo hide caption

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Alamy Stock Photo

Oh, what a beautiful archive: Oscar Hammerstein's letters reveal his many sides

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'On Juneteenth' historian examines the hope and hostility toward emancipation

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Poet Ryann Stevenson William Brewer hide caption

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William Brewer

In 'Human Resources,' a poet finds her voice by working on artificial intelligence

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A Black woman receives a COVID-19 vaccine at a clinic in Tampa, Fla. Black Americans have died of the disease at a rate more than double that of white people. Octavio Jones/Getty Images hide caption

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Octavio Jones/Getty Images

'1619 Project' journalist lays bare why Black Americans 'live sicker and die quicker'

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Green Apple Books

'Greenland' revives E.M. Forster — and spins a tale of racism and self-discovery

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