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With the pandemic, many people are turning to at-home workouts and walks in their neighborhoods. That's good, says Exercised author Daniel Lieberman. "You don't have to do incredible strength training ... to get some benefits of physical activity." Grace Cary/Getty Images hide caption

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Grace Cary/Getty Images

Just Move: Scientist Author Debunks Myths About Exercise And Sleep

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Historian Tyler Stovall Discusses His New Book: 'White Freedom'

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An illustration shows medical student Elizabeth Blackwell at Geneva Medical College (later Hobart College) in upstate New York, as she eyes a note dropped onto her arm by a male student, during a lecture in the college's operating room. Bettmann/Getty Images hide caption

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'Doctors Blackwell' Tells The Story Of 2 Pioneering Sisters Who Changed Medicine

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Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., has a new publisher for his book The Tyranny of Big Tech. Simon & Schuster dropped the title after the deadly insurrection at the Capitol on Jan. 6, saying Hawley played a role in fomenting the mob attack that threatened House and Senate members. Patrick Semansky/AP Photo/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP Photo/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Nadia Owusu is a Brooklyn-based writer and urban planner. Beowulf Sheehan/Simon & Schuster hide caption

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Beowulf Sheehan/Simon & Schuster

'Aftershocks' Is A Powerful Memoir Of A Life Upended — Then Pieced Back Together

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Martin Luther King Jr. addresses the crowd at the March On Washington D.C., on Aug. 28, 1963. CNP/Getty Images hide caption

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Poetry Challenge: Honor MLK By Describing How You Dream A World

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Music journalist Betto Arcos gathers his favorite reports from prolific career in Music Stories from the Cosmic Barrio. Erik Esparza/Courtesy of the author hide caption

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Erik Esparza/Courtesy of the author

Betto Arcos Shares The Power Of Community In 'Music Stories From The Cosmic Barrio'

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Algonquin Books

Trying To Survive On The Margins In 'At The Edge Of The Haight'

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Parler, founded in Nevada in 2018, bills itself as an alternative to "ideological suppression" at other social networks. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

What's Next For Social Media After Trump? Plus The Lie Of 'Laziness'

A lot of the pro-Trump extremism behind the attack on the Capitol flourished online. Sam talks to Bobby Allyn and Shannon Bond, who both cover tech for NPR, about social platforms and the actions they've taken since the siege, the implications for free speech and whether the internet could fundamentally change. Also, Sam talks to Devon Price, author of the book Laziness Does Not Exist, about the lie of laziness and what it means for productivity.

What's Next For Social Media After Trump? Plus The Lie Of 'Laziness'

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