Books: Book Reviews, Book News, and Author Interviews NPR's brings you news about books and authors along with our picks for great reads. Interviews, reviews, and much more.

Friday

The American Library Association had its annual conference in Chicago last year. Several states have moved to disassociate with the ALA amid what some conservatives say has been politicization of the group. ALA officials deny having a political agenda. Claire Savage/AP hide caption

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Claire Savage/AP

Thursday

Tracing the rise of Christian nationalism, from Trump to the Ala. Supreme Court

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Wednesday

The creator of 'Heartstopper' talks about her work and demand for LGBTQ stories

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A farmer works at an avocado plantation at the Los Cerritos avocado group ranch in Ciudad Guzman, state of Jalisco, Mexico. Ulises Ruiz/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ulises Ruiz/AFP via Getty Images

This data scientist has a plan for how to feed the world sustainably

According to the United Nations, about ten percent of the world is undernourished. It's a daunting statistic — unless your name is Hannah Ritchie. She's the data scientist behind the new book Not the End of the World: How We Can Be the First Generation to Build a Sustainable Planet. It's a seriously big thought experiment: How do we feed everyone on Earth sustainably? And because it's just as much an economically pressing question as it is a scientific one, Darian Woods of The Indicator from Planet Money joins us. With Hannah's help, Darian unpacks how to meet the needs of billions of people without destroying the planet.

This data scientist has a plan for how to feed the world sustainably

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Tuesday

Iraq War failures can be boiled down to miscommunications, according to this author

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The idea that sentences can end with a preposition has become a point of contention in the replies to a tongue-in-cheek social media post from dictionary publisher Merriam-Webster. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Monday

Cognitive neuroscientist Charan Ranganath says the human brain isn't programmed to remember everything. Rather, it's designed to "carry what we need and to deploy it rapidly when we need it." Bulat Silvia/iStock / Getty Images Plus hide caption

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Bulat Silvia/iStock / Getty Images Plus

When is forgetting normal — and when is it worrisome? A neuroscientist weighs in

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Bloomsbury Publishing

Dishy-yet-earnest, 'Cocktails' revisits the making of 'Virginia Woolf'

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'Burn Book' chronicles a journalist's career covering Silicon Valley titans

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Sunday

Sloane Crosley on her memoir 'Grief is for People', mourning and magical thinking

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Saturday

Tommy Orange on his new novel 'Wandering Stars'

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Friday

The Hugo Awards scandal has shaken the sci-fi community

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Wednesday

Lucy Sante, shown here in January 2024, says, "I am lucky to have survived my own repression. I think a lot of people in my position have not." Roy Rochlin/Getty Images for The Guardian hide caption

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Roy Rochlin/Getty Images for The Guardian

A gender-swapping photo app helped Lucy Sante come out as trans at age 67

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