NPR Corrections

NPR corrects significant errors in broadcast and online reports. Corrections of errors will be made in audio archives, written transcripts and on the website. To report an error, please use our corrections form.

Morning Edition

Post Makes Custom Box Of Fruity Pebbles For Cereal-Loving Cat

Corrected on February 26, 2021

In the audio of this story and in a previous Web introduction, we incorrectly say Trash Panda was adopted in Fulton County, Ga. The cereal-loving celebrity cat actually calls the Midwest home. He lives in Fulton County, Ill.

Magnets: The Hidden Objects Powering Your Life

Corrected on February 26, 2021

An earlier version of this episode incorrectly described the role magnets play in creating sound in speakers. It has since been updated to explain it correctly.

All Things Considered

Remembering U-Roy, Jamaican Dancehall Icon

Corrected on February 23, 2021

In this report, we incorrectly say that the Whatz Up TV interview with U-Roy and DJ Kool Herc took place in 2013. It was actually recorded in 2004.

Ask Me Another

Raining Hamiltons

Corrected on February 22, 2021

In this episode, we incorrectly say that Aaron Burr refers to Alexander Hamilton as the $10 Founding Father in the musical Hamilton. In fact, the line in the musical is said by the actor who plays John Laurens and Philip Hamilton.

Price Check: Nations Pay Wildly Different Prices For Vaccines

Corrected on February 21, 2021

In an earlier version of this post, the government of India was credited for donating some doses of the vaccine to Trinidad and Tobago. In fact, India donated doses to Barbados, which distributed batches of them to several of its Caribbean neighbors.

All Things Considered

The Capitol Siege: The Arrested And Their Stories

Corrected on February 20, 2021

In an earlier version of this database, the summary for Vitali GossJankowski was mistakenly entered twice and appeared incorrectly for Cindy Sue Fitchett.

Metropolitan Opera Backstage Workers: 'Without People, The Opera Is Nothing'

Corrected on February 19, 2021

A previous version of this story incorrectly attributed a statement to Metropolitan Opera general manager Peter Gelb. The statement came from the Met's press office. In addition, we incorrectly stated that negotiations had yet to begin between the Met and its two musicians' unions. In fact, negotiations have begun with the American Guild of Musical Artists (AGMA).

Son Of Prominent Conservative Activist Charged In Capitol Riot

Corrected on February 19, 2021

An earlier version of this story, relying on court documents, noted that a witness informed the FBI that Bozell was a girls' basketball coach at the Hershey Christian Academy. After publication, the school stated that this information was incorrect, and Bozell has never been a coach at the school.

Morning Edition

13,150,080 Minutes: It's Been 25 Years Since The First Performance Of 'Rent'

Corrected on February 19, 2021

The previous headline on this story, "13,140,000 Minutes: It's Been 25 Years Since The First Performance Of 'Rent,'" referenced a lyric from the song "Seasons of Love": Five hundred twenty five thousand six hundred minutes / How do you measure? Measure a year? However, not all years have 525,600 minutes. Leap years have 527,040 minutes. There have been seven leap years in the last 25 years, and thus the headline has been changed to "13,150,080 Minutes: It's Been 25 Years Since The First Performance Of 'Rent.'"

Steps Of The Senate Impeachment Trial: What Happens Before Final Vote

Corrected on February 12, 2021

In a previous version of this story, opening statements made by Trump lawyer Michael van der Veen were mistakenly attributed to Bruce Castor Jr. These statements included characterizing the trial as "political vengeance" that is part of a years-long "witch hunt."

Morning Edition

Historic Portraits, Including 1 Of Susan B. Anthony, Discovered In Attic

Corrected on February 10, 2021

An earlier version of the audio of this report incorrectly said that Susan B. Anthony helped organize the women's rights convention in Seneca Falls. She did not organize that convention.

Clarification, previously posted Feb. 9: An earlier version of this report used the word "suffragette," a word that can have a negative connotation. It has been replaced with "suffragist."

Morning Edition

Up For Sale: 'Possibly The Thinnest House In London'

Corrected on February 9, 2021

A previous Web introduction to this report incorrectly said that the house had an asking price of $1.3 billion. In fact, the price is $1.3 million.

Moderna Increases COVID-19 Vaccine Shipments While Pfizer Lags Behind

Corrected on February 8, 2021

An earlier version of this online story said there was insufficient transparency around the supply of Shingrix shingles vaccine in 2009, but a former official with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention clarified to NPR that the problem that year was with flu vaccine. Issues with Shingrix occurred in subsequent years.

Morning Edition

'An American Project': For Decades, Dawoud Bey Has Chronicled Black Life

Corrected on February 3, 2021

A previous version of this story said the exhibition was at the High Museum of American Art. It should have said the High Museum of Art. Also, the story originally said that Trayvon Martin was killed by a police officer. In fact, George Zimmerman, the man who killed Martin, was a neighborhood watch volunteer at the time of the shooting.

All Things Considered

Early Data Shows Striking Racial Disparities In Who's Getting The COVID-19 Vaccine

Corrected on January 29, 2021

A previous version of this Web story mistakenly said that 15% of Black people in Mississippi and 15% of Hispanic people in Texas have been vaccinated. In fact, 15% of those who have been vaccinated in Mississippi are Black, while 15% of those vaccinated in Texas are Hispanic.

The College Buyout Boom

Corrected on January 27, 2021

In an earlier version of this episode, we said Pennsylvania State University had closed some of its regional campuses. This is incorrect. Penn State has not closed any of its campuses. We have removed the language related to that error.

Morning Edition

He Saved 669 Children From Nazis — A New Book Tells His Story To Kids

Corrected on January 27, 2021

An earlier version of this story mistakenly said Nicholas Winton died in 2016. In fact, he died in 2015. Also, a previous summary of this story that appeared on the homepage mistakenly said the children escaped Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia in 1938. In fact, the year was 1939.

Morning Edition

Pompeo Accused China Of Genocide. Experts Say That Term Is Complicated

Corrected on January 24, 2021

In this story, we incorrectly say that President Biden's national security adviser agrees that the Chinese government is committing genocide and crimes against humanity against ethnic Uighurs and other Muslims. While Biden's nominee for secretary of state agrees with this assessment, his national security adviser hasn't publicly weighed in on the issue.

The Uncounted Workforce

Corrected on January 23, 2021

In an earlier version of this episode and in the Web introduction, we said several companies had relied on the labor of incarcerated people in past decades. One of those companies, AT&T, disputed the claim. We relied on sourcing from decades ago, but after review, could not independently and directly confirm those sources today. We have removed the language related to that.

Photos: The Internet's Favorite Inauguration Day Fashions

Corrected on January 22, 2021

In a previous version of this story, Ella Emhoff's stylist was incorrectly identified as Joseph Charles Viola. In fact, Jill Lincoln and Jordan Johnson styled Emhoff for the event. Viola is Emhoff's agent.

DOJ Drops Insider Trading Investigation Into Sen. Richard Burr

Corrected on January 20, 2021

An earlier version of this story said that Sen. Burr privately warned a group of well-connected constituents about the threat from coronavirus and then sold his shares in travel companies. In fact, he sold the shares two weeks prior to issuing that warning.

U.S. Space Command Headquarters May Land In Alabama

Corrected on January 14, 2021

An earlier version of this story said Space Command is a department of the Air Force. It is a combatant command of the Department of Defense that conducts operations in, from and to outer space.

Ask Me Another

Real Or Fake Holiday Album

Corrected on January 14, 2021

In this episode, we incorrectly say that Curious George: A Very Curious Christmas is a real title. In fact, the real title is Curious George: A Very Monkey Christmas.

Morning Edition

Sheldon Adelson, Conservative Donor And Casino Titan, Dies At 87

Corrected on January 12, 2021

An earlier version of this story said that Birthright Israel sends American Jewish youth to Israel on free guided trips. The organization sends Jewish youth from around the world on the trips.

All Things Considered

How One Kenyan Tribe Produces The World's Best Runners

Corrected on January 11, 2021

An earlier version of this story incorrectly identified David Epstein as a senior editor at Sports Illustrated. At the time this story was published, he had recently changed jobs from senior writer at Sports Illustrated to reporter with ProPublica.

Police Confirm Death Of Officer Injured During Attack On Capitol

Corrected on January 8, 2021

A version of this story published at 8 p.m. ET prematurely reported that U.S. Capitol Police Officer Brian D. Sicknick had died, based on information from a source. Later, U.S. Capitol Police announced that Sicknick had died at 9:30 p.m.

Trump Condemns Capitol Hill Violence, Ignores His Role In Inciting The Mob

Corrected on January 7, 2021

Updated Saturday at noon

An earlier version of this story incorrectly said the video came two weeks after the election rather than two months. In addition, a version of this story published at about 8 p.m. ET prematurely reported that five people, including a Capitol Police officer, died, based on information from a source. The death toll was four at that time. Later, U.S. Capitol Police announced that Officer Brian D. Sicknick had died at 9:30 p.m.

Timeline: How One Of The Darkest Days In American History Unfolded

Corrected on January 7, 2021

A previous version of this story attributed one of President Trump's quotes to the wrong medium. He did not say, "These are the things and events that happen ... Remember this day forever " in the video he released. He made that statement in a subsequent tweet that has now been removed.

It All Comes Down To This — 2 Georgia Races That Will Determine Control Of The Senate

Corrected on January 5, 2021

A previous version of this story incorrectly said that in both Senate races, all candidates from all parties were on one ballot in November. That was only true of the special election, which ended in a runoff between Sen. Kelly Loeffler and Raphael Warnock. The Perdue-Ossoff contest went through a traditional primary process.

Weekend Edition Sunday

2020 Was A Record-Breaking Year For Gun-Related Deaths In The U.S.

Corrected on January 4, 2021

In this report, we incorrectly say Sonali Rajan is an associate professor in the Department of Health and Behavioral Studies at Columbia University. In fact, she is an associate professor of health education at Teachers College, Columbia University.

Morning Edition

In Memoriam 2020: The Musicians We Lost

Corrected on January 2, 2021

A previous version of this story incorrectly listed Sean Malone's birth date as Jan, 1, 1970. He was born April 12, 1970.

A previous version of this story incorrectly described producer Hal Willner. He was a live event record producer, curator of tributes and musical matchmaker — not a Nashville-based singer-songwriter.

Party Like It's 1925 On Public Domain Day (Gatsby And Dalloway Are In)

Corrected on January 1, 2021

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that Congress pushed the date of copyright expiration from 75 years to 97 years in 2001. In fact, the Copyright Term Extension Act was passed in 1998 and extended copyright for certain works, including those from 1925, to 95 years.