NPR Corrections

NPR corrects significant errors in broadcast and online reports. Corrections of errors will be made in audio archives, written transcripts and on the website. To report an error, please use our corrections form.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Snopes, Facebook And Fake Accounts

Corrected on October 18, 2020

Since the airing of this story, we received a request from The Epoch Times to respond to the allegations in this story. It provided this statement:

Statement from The Epoch Times:
"The introduction to this interview states that The Epoch Times was behind this 'sophisticated misinformation campaign.' The Epoch Times vehemently denies that it was involved in this misinformation campaign. The Epoch Times has no connection with The Beauty of Life (The BL), and the companies are in no way affiliated with one another. The BL was founded by a former employee and employs some of our former employees. However, that some of our former employees work for The BL is not evidence of any connection between the two organizations."

'Emily In Paris' Is A Painless And Pretty Frolic (And That's About It)

Corrected on October 11, 2020

An earlier version of this story misspelled the character Luc's name as Luke. And because of incorrect information provided by Netflix, an earlier version mistakenly said that Samuel Arnold plays Luc, and Bruno Gouery plays the character Julien. In fact, Arnold plays Julien, and Gouery plays Luc.

Micro Wave: Does Talking To Plants Help Them Grow?

Corrected on October 10, 2020

An earlier version of this episode stated that Heidi Appel considers plants "sentient beings." Appel's view is that while plants have the capacity for sensations, they are not necessarily capable of self-awareness.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Rita Wilson Wants You To Get Your Flu Shot

Corrected on October 10, 2020

A previous version of this transcript incorrectly referred to Rita Wilson's new song as "What would I say." It is called "What I would say."

Where Kamala Harris Studied Economics

Corrected on October 6, 2020

A previous version of this article incorrectly said that Kamala Harris was the first person on a presidential ticket since George H.W. Bush to have an economics degree. Donald Trump, Tim Kaine, and Paul Ryan have one as well.

All Things Considered

Women Conductors Are The Rule, Not The Exception, At A New Classical Event

Corrected on October 6, 2020

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we state that less than 10% of major orchestras in the U.S. are directed by women. In fact, 9.2% of all orchestras in the U.S. are directed by women, according to the most recent figures published by the League of American Orchestras, based on information submitted by the orchestras that responded to the League's survey.

Morning Edition

Signed, Sealed, Undelivered: Thousands Of Mail-In Ballots Rejected For Tardiness

Corrected on October 6, 2020

NPR has removed the totals for Virginia because the state sent revised numbers after the publication of this story acknowledging that the numbers it provided earlier were incorrect.

"We discovered an error in the way the data was reported initially and, once discovered, it was corrected." Elections Commissioner Christopher Piper told NPR.

The state now says that only 469 absentee ballots (or 0.74% of the total) were rejected in the March primary. However, that number includes all rejected ballots, not only those that arrived too late to be counted.

NPR has also removed totals from Rhode Island because the state has since partially updated their primary numbers and has not provided NPR with a new number of rejected ballots specifically due to lateness.

At Least 8 People Test Positive For Coronavirus After Rose Garden Event For Barrett

Corrected on October 3, 2020

In a previous version of this story, we incorrectly said Kellyanne Conway sat in the front row at the Rose Garden event. Pictures show her seated in the second row. In addition, the story said Sen. Mike Lee received a positive test result on Friday. Actually, he announced on Friday that he had tested positive the day before. In an earlier caption, we incorrectly referred to Sen. Deb Fischer as Rep. Deb Fischer.

Building The Kingdom Of God

Corrected on October 2, 2020

In an earlier version of this episode, we quoted Professor Julie Ingersoll saying Ron Paul "ran as [the Constitution Party] presidential candidate a couple of times". In fact, though the Constitution Party listed him as their candidate on ballots in some states, Ron Paul ran for president as a Republican and as a Libertarian. He also endorsed the Constitution Party candidate for president in 2008.

Morning Edition

Ireland Lacrosse Bows Out Of 2022 World Games So Iroquois Nationals Can Play

Corrected on October 1, 2020

Because of incorrect information from the production company that provided the image, an earlier caption on this story misidentified the event as the 2015 World Games. The World Games did not take place in 2015. The event pictured is the 2015 World Indoor Lacrosse Championship.

Morning Edition

Trump Administration Appeals Order That Bars Census From Ending Early

Corrected on September 28, 2020

An earlier Web version of this story, as well as the audio version, said that a court order required the Census Bureau to continue counting efforts through Oct. 31. It would have been more accurate to say that the order suspends Sept. 30 as the end date for counting, which in turn reinstates the end date that the Trump administration had previously announced, Oct. 31.

Kentucky Grand Jury Indicts 1 Of 3 Officers In Breonna Taylor Case

Corrected on September 23, 2020

A previous version of this story said the former officer who was indicted fatally shot Breonna Taylor. In fact, Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said state investigators couldn't determine which of the three officers fired the fatal shot, while the FBI pointed to another officer.

All Things Considered

Kentucky's Rupp Arena: A College Basketball Mecca With A Complicated Racial Past

Corrected on September 23, 2020

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that Adolph Rupp coached only one Black player. In fact, Rupp signed only one Black player but coached a total of three. In his final season, Rupp coached two Black players from the University of Kentucky football team who temporarily joined the basketball squad as walk-ons.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Anne Helen Petersen Talks Millennial Burnout

Corrected on September 19, 2020

A previous headline incorrectly referred to Anne Helen Petersen as Helen Peterson. The intro also misspelled Petersen's last name as Peterson.

Here Are The 50 Books Nominated for 2020 National Book Awards

Corrected on September 18, 2020

A previous version of this story incorrectly said the National Book Foundation released the longlists for its awards on Friday. The lists for the five categories were announced throughout the week. The story also said the virtual awards ceremony will be Nov. 11. The event is scheduled for Nov. 18. In addition, the story had said Isabel Wilkerson had been nominated in the past. This is her first nomination for the National Book Awards.

'Ratched' Is Pretty, But Very Silly

Corrected on September 18, 2020

Because of incorrect information provided by Netflix, a previous version of this story gave Robert Foulkes' last name as Fultz.

After The Plague

Corrected on September 17, 2020

A previous version of this story referred to smoking tobacco as something people did to try to protect themselves from the plague. While this was practiced during later outbreaks of bubonic plague, tobacco wasn't widely introduced to Europe until the 16th century.

All Things Considered

'Regarding Paul R. Williams' Honors Legacy Of LA's Barrier-Breaking Black Architect

Corrected on September 17, 2020

In a previous audio version of this story, we incorrectly said that the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 1948 that racially restrictive covenants were unconstitutional. In fact, the Supreme Court ruled that enforcement of racially restrictive covenants by courts was unconstitutional.

Some Urban Hospitals Face Closure Or Cutbacks As The Pandemic Adds To Fiscal Woes

Corrected on September 15, 2020

An earlier version of this story said that George Washington University Hospital was part of a deal with the District of Columbia to build a new hospital in Washington, D.C. While GWU Hospital was originally involved in the plan, the District's ultimate deal was with Universal Health Services, the company that operates GWU Hospital.

Weekend Edition Saturday

'It Was Said' Podcast Breaks Down Iconic American Speeches

Corrected on September 12, 2020

In a previous version of this story, we incorrectly said Barbara Jordan was the first black woman in Congress. She was the first black woman representing Texas in Congress.

Soldier Who Helped Rescue 75 Hostages Awarded Medal Of Honor

Corrected on September 12, 2020

A previous version of this story said Sgt. Maj. Thomas Payne was the first member of a Delta Force team to receive the Medal of Honor. Master Sgt. Gary Gordon and Sgt. 1st Class Randy Shughart were awarded the medal posthumously for their role in the 1993 Somalia raid known as "Black Hawk Down."

PHOTOS: Oregon Grapples With Historic Fires

Corrected on September 11, 2020

The original version of this story said wildfires in northwest Oregon had forced 500,000 residents to flee their homes. In fact, 500,000 have either evacuated or been told to be ready to go.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday Puzzle: Next-To-Last

Corrected on September 6, 2020

Previous audio and Web versions of this puzzle incorrectly implied that West Virginia is the second-to-last U.S. state in alphabetical order. Wisconsin is second to last. Also, in a previous audio version, we incorrectly said that Clare Luce was the publisher of Reader's Digest.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Mexican States Ban Sale Of Junk Food To Minors

Corrected on September 5, 2020

An earlier headline of this story said Mexico is banning junk food sales to minors. Only two Mexican states have passed bans.

Biden Calls School Reopening A 'National Emergency'

Corrected on September 4, 2020

A previous version of this story said Iowa State University's football home opener has been canceled. The team will play at home on Sept. 12, but there will be no fans present.

Morning Edition

First Chinese-Language Production Of 'A Raisin In The Sun' Is Staged In Beijing

Corrected on September 3, 2020

An earlier Web version of this story incorrectly stated that at least hundreds of Uighurs have been extralegally detained by China. In fact, it is at least hundreds of thousands of Uighurs. And in the audio version of this story, as well as in a previous Web version, Harvey Young is mistakenly referred to as the dean of the College of Fine Arts at Boston College. He is a dean at Boston University.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Opinion: The Greatest Athletes Know That The Children Are Watching

Corrected on August 29, 2020

A previous version of this story, both in the audio and on the Web, incorrectly stated that Jackie Robinson marched with Martin Luther King Jr. 50 years ago on the National Mall. Robinson and King marched together 57 years ago.

The Science Of Wildfire Smoke

Corrected on August 27, 2020

An earlier version of this episode incorrectly characterized the relationship between smoke and climate change as part of a negative feedback loop. In fact, it is a positive feedback loop.

Is Afghanistan Waiting For The U.S. Election Before Starting Peace Talks?

Corrected on August 25, 2020

In the audio, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly call the Afghanistan Analysts Network the Afghan Analysts Network. In a previous Web version, we also misidentified Intizar Khadim as an official on the Afghan negotiating team. While peace negotiations are in his purview as a member of Afghanistan's National Security Council, he is not one of the negotiators.

Weekend Edition Sunday

More People Of Color Needed In COVID-19 Vaccine Trials

Corrected on August 23, 2020

In a previous version of this report, a guest incorrectly stated that in the Tuskegee experiment, Black men were infected with a disease without their consent. In fact, researchers failed to adequately treat the men, who had not been told they were part of a U.S. Public Health Service study.

Fact Check: Biden's Address To The DNC, Annotated

Corrected on August 21, 2020

An earlier version of this story said the July unemployment rate of 10.2% is higher than any previous, post-war recession. In fact, the unemployment rate was higher in 1982 and 1983, reaching as high as 10.8%.

Morning Edition

Move-In Day: Cornavirus Reshapes The College Experience

Corrected on August 20, 2020

NPR reported that the University of Georgia in Athens was conducting randomized COVID-19 testing every day on campus. The university later clarified that, at the time this story was reported, this plan had not yet been implemented.

Can Air Conditioners Spread COVID-19?

Corrected on August 18, 2020

An earlier version of this story incorrectly described the air exchange that occurs with an HVAC system and did not explain that these systems bring in outdoor air and send out an equal amount of indoor air.

Purge Of Senior Officials At Foreign Broadcast Agency Stirs Fear And Outrage

Corrected on August 15, 2020

A previous version of this story misspelled Oanh Tran's first name as Oahn. In addition, the story had referred to John Lansing as the first CEO of the U.S. Agency for Global Media. He was CEO when the agency adopted its current name to better reflect its purpose. However, the consolidation of the government's international broadcasters goes back decades.

Morning Edition

Poll: Biden Expands Lead; A Third Of Country Says It Won't Get Vaccinated

Corrected on August 14, 2020

A previous version of this story incorrectly said that only 22% of potential Joe Biden voters cited support for him as their motivation, as opposed to voting against President Trump. In fact, it is 22% of would-be Trump voters who are motivated to vote against Biden.

Fresh Air

Veteran GOP Strategist Takes On Trump — And His Party — In 'It Was All A Lie'

Corrected on August 14, 2020

In the audio version of this story, we suggest that the vote on the 1964 Civil Rights Act represented a change in how the parties addressed race. A higher percentage of congressional Republicans voted for the law as compared with Democrats. However, that year the Republican Party nominated Barry Goldwater, who voted no, for president and saw the start of a migration of pro-segregation Southern Democrats to the GOP

All Things Considered

California Judge Orders Uber And Lyft To Consider All Drivers Employees

Corrected on August 11, 2020

A previous version of the Web story said the judge had directed the ride-hailing companies to give drivers the same protections as full-time employees. Actually, the judge said the companies could no longer consider drivers as independent contractors. In addition, the story did not note that companies have the option of hiring these drivers part time.

Morning Edition

Micah Thomas Is A Jazz Pianist With A Lot Of Runway

Corrected on August 11, 2020

A previous version of this story stated that Micah Thomas recently finished his undergraduate studies at Juilliard. He recently finished his graduate studies.

Morning Edition

Coronavirus Cases Are Surging. The Contact Tracing Workforce Is Not

Corrected on August 7, 2020

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly state the total contact tracers as 41,960. It is actually 41,122. We also say that four states meet their estimated need for contact tracing; only three do. Alaska does not.

All Things Considered

New Research Shows Dinosaurs Suffered From Malignant Cancer, Too

Corrected on August 5, 2020

In an earlier version of this story, David Evans is quoted as saying the study shows that dinosaurs were probably afflicted by "all sorts of other cancers that we see in invertebrates today." In fact, he said "in vertebrates today."

'Cocoon' Actor Wilford Brimley Dies At 85

Corrected on August 2, 2020

An earlier version of this story mistakenly said Wilford Brimley appeared in a Liberty Mutual ad. He appeared in an ad for Liberty Medical.

Germany's Economy Suffers Biggest Quarterly Drop On Record

Corrected on July 31, 2020

A previous version of this story inaccurately stated that Germany's economic contraction was lower than that of the U.S. economy. Germany's gross domestic product actually declined by a greater percentage.

$600 A Week: Poverty Remedy Or Job Slayer?

Corrected on July 28, 2020

An earlier version of this story incorrectly said the average take-home pay would be $940. That's the amount of unemployment benefits before taxes are taken out. Also, an earlier version mistakenly said America's poverty rate hasn't fallen as fast as it would have during this recession. Two studies actually show that the poverty rate hasn't dramatically worsened.

Previously posted July 27: An earlier version of this story mistakenly said the extra $600 in weekly unemployment benefits was for every person who lost a job because of the pandemic. The extra benefit goes to every person who qualifies for unemployment benefits during the pandemic.

Can Restaurants Reopen?

Corrected on July 28, 2020

A previous version of this podcast episode and Web introduction incorrectly stated that the restaurant chain IHOP filed for bankruptcy. The bankruptcy filing was in fact made by a franchisee, CFRA Holdings, which operates 49 IHOP locations in the southeast.

Morning Edition

'Tidal Wave' Of Power Shut-Offs Looms As Nation Grapples With Heat

Corrected on July 28, 2020

An earlier version of this story incorrectly said that Florida Power & Light is scheduled to resume shut-offs at the end of July. The utility says it has not made a final decision on when it's going to resume disconnections for nonpayment. And a reference to Sanya Carley mistakenly said she is an associate professor; she is a professor.

The Link Between Deforestation and Disease

Corrected on July 25, 2020

In a previous version of this podcast, we incorrectly said that the 2013 Ebola outbreak likely started when a boy played near a tree filled with fruit bats. Scientists believe the tree was actually infested with insectivorous bats.

All Things Considered

Ex-Counterterrorism Chief: Cutbacks Raise Risk Of New Attacks

Corrected on July 21, 2020

The original online version incorrectly stated that the National Counterterrorism Center said it offered Travers other jobs. It was the Office of the Director of National Intelligence that said it offered Travers other jobs.

All Things Considered

TV Review: 'P-Valley'

Corrected on July 21, 2020

In this report, we incorrectly refer to Uncle Clifford with the pronoun "he." The character uses "she" as a pronoun.

The Long Hot Summer

Corrected on July 17, 2020

In a previous version of this episode we referred to John Lindsay as a senator, he was mayor of New York City at the time. The audio has been changed to reflect this fact.

Morning Edition

Trump Administration Clears For-Profit Colleges To Register Veterans Again

Corrected on July 17, 2020

A previous version of this story incorrectly implied that all four schools mentioned in the VA's decision were for-profit universities that have repeatedly been accused of deceptive practices. Temple University and Bellevue University are nonprofit schools with little or no record of GI Bill complaints.

Jeff Sessions Loses Comeback Bid For Alabama Senate Seat

Corrected on July 15, 2020

A previous version of this story incorrectly said Doug Jones was the first Alabama Democrat to be elected to the U.S. Senate since 1997. In fact, the previous Democratic win came in 1992. However, an Alabama Democrat did finish his term in the U.S. Senate in 1997.

All Things Considered

Key Figure In The Impeachment Inquiry Retires From The Military

Corrected on July 8, 2020

A previous headline incorrectly stated that Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman resigned. He retired, which comes with retirement pay and benefits. Resignation denotes severing all ties with the military.

Trump Flouts Virus Rules, Warns Of 'New Far-Left Fascism' At Mount Rushmore Event

Corrected on July 4, 2020

An earlier version of this story indicated that Ahmaud Arbery was killed by police. Three white men have been indicted on murder charges for Arbery's death. Neither man is a current member of law enforcement, but one suspect, Gregory McMichael, is a former officer with the Glynn County Police Department.

Revived Mount Rushmore Fireworks Will Feature Trump But No Social Distancing

Corrected on July 2, 2020

Due to a transcription error, a previous version of this story misquoted Bill Gabbert as saying, "Conducting that prescribed fire won't reduce the amount of flammable material — the vegetation that is on the ground." Actually, he said that a "prescribed fire will reduce the amount of flammable material."

What Is No Longer In A Name: Rhode Island Official Docs Shed Racially Loaded Moniker

Corrected on June 23, 2020

An earlier version of this story said it was ironic that Roger Williams, who advocated for the abolition of slavery, included the words "Providence Plantations" in the name of the then-new colony. At the time, the word "plantation" referred to a new settlement and didn't connote an agricultural estate cultivated by slaves.

Patent Racism

Corrected on June 22, 2020

A previous version of this story cited the wrong economist calling Dr. Cook's work an original idea that should be published. It was Milton Friedman, not Martin Feldstein.

Money And Justice

Corrected on June 21, 2020

In this report, we incorrectly refer to the Bureau of Justice Statistics as the Bureau of Justice Services.

Yes, Wearing Masks Helps. Here's Why

Corrected on June 21, 2020

An earlier version of this story mistakenly said the Cell study was published last week; it was published in late May. And an earlier version incorrectly said the study from Proceedings of the Royal Society A was published last week; it was published earlier in June. And BMJ Global Health was misstated as BMJ.

All Things Considered

The History Of Juneteenth, And Why It Is Relevant Today

Corrected on June 20, 2020

This story incorrectly says the Emancipation Proclamation took effect on Jan. 1, 1865. It went into effect on Jan. 1, 1863, but the enslaved people in Texas were not informed until June 19, 1865.

Morning Edition

Whistleblower: TSA Failed To Protect Staff, Endangered Passengers During Pandemic

Corrected on June 19, 2020

In a previous version of this story, we incorrectly said the Transportation Security Administration was created in 2003. It was created in 2001 and moved under the Department of Homeland Security in 2003. In addition, we said Jay Brainard has been with the agency since its inception. He started in 2002.

When Political Partisanship And The Military Collide

Corrected on June 18, 2020

An earlier version of this story indicated that Gen. Mark Milley walked with President Trump to St. John's Church. In fact, Milley stopped in Lafayette Square and did not accompany the president all the way to the church.

Fresh Air

Reporter Details William Barr's Effort To Uphold Trump's 'Law And Order' Image

Corrected on June 12, 2020

In this interview, we incorrectly say the Minneapolis City Council passed a veto-proof resolution to dismantle the city's police department on Sunday. Although members announced their plans on Sunday, a resolution on changes to the police department was not passed, unanimously, until Friday.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday Puzzle: Lost ID's

Corrected on June 11, 2020

A previous version of the Sunday Puzzle incorrectly stated that Anita Charles is from Auburn, Fla. Charles is from Auburn, Maine.

Minneapolis Agrees To Ban Chokeholds And Neck Restraints By Police

Corrected on June 5, 2020

An earlier version of this story said that the Minnesota Department of Human Rights had opened an investigation into the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police. In fact, the department opened a civil rights investigation into the city police in the wake of Floyd's killing.

Medical Examiner's Autopsy Reveals George Floyd Had Positive Test For Coronavirus

Corrected on June 4, 2020

A previous version of this story incorrectly said the autopsy report from the Hennepin County Medical Examiner's Office was dated May 25. The autopsy was not performed until May 26, per the report. The story also incorrectly suggested a preliminary report released Monday said the autopsy "revealed no physical findings that support a diagnosis of traumatic asphyxia or strangulation." Those words were cited last week but were not part of the report released Monday. In addition, the story incorrectly said the charge of second-degree murder against Derek Chauvin carries a maximum penalty of 12.5 years in prison. In fact, that charge carries a maximum sentence of 40 years in prison.

Run The Jewels Releases New Album 'RTJ4' Early

Corrected on June 3, 2020

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that proceeds generated from the release of the album will go to the National Lawyers Guild and other social justice organizations.

All Things Considered

Tracee Ellis Ross Can Hit The High Notes, Too

Corrected on May 30, 2020

A previous version of this Web story incorrectly said the singer whom Tracee Ellis Ross portrays is named Grace Jones. The character's name is Grace Davis.

New Postmaster General Is Top GOP Fundraiser

Corrected on May 30, 2020

A previous version of this Web story incorrectly said President Trump appointed Louis DeJoy as postmaster general. He was appointed by the USPS Board of Governors.

All Things Considered

Hurricane Season Will Be Above Average, NOAA Warns

Corrected on May 22, 2020

The radio version of this report incorrectly stated that hurricane season ends on November 1. Hurricane season runs through November 30.

All Things Considered

How To Prevent Glasses From Fogging Up While Wearing A Mask

Corrected on May 18, 2020

In this report, we mischaracterize Joseph Allen's use of Dawn dish soap on eyeglasses. While many think Dawn helps keep glasses from fogging up, Allen is suggesting it as a way to clean glasses — not as a way to defog them.

Morning Edition

14 Hours And A Costco Card: How A Grocer In Alaska Feeds His Town In A Pandemic

Corrected on May 16, 2020

While Toshua Parker does use his own boat as a workaround to ferry service disruptions, he first began making the round trip to Juneau in his own boat due to disruptions before the coronavirus pandemic. Our thanks to public radio station KTOO in Juneau, as well as The Hustle, for assistance with this story.

Morning Edition

11-Year-Old Skateboarder Shreds World Record

Corrected on May 13, 2020

In this report, we say Gui Khury became the first skateboarder to land a 1,080-degree spin. He was the first to do so on a vertical ramp.

Judge Says He Faced No Political Pressure From McConnell To Retire

Corrected on May 12, 2020

A previous version of this story said Justin Walker was rated "not qualified" by the American Bar Association for a judgeship. He had been rated unqualified for a district court post in Kentucky, but the ABA found him "well-qualified" to serve on the D.C. Circuit.

All Things Considered

6 Ways College Might Look Different In The Fall

Corrected on May 5, 2020

This post has been updated to show that research from Kim Weeden and Benjamin Cornwell found that eliminating large classes did lessen connections between students, but left the small world network of a campus intact.

Morning Edition

During Pandemic, Work Dries Up For Actors And Producers

Corrected on May 4, 2020

This story says The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel will be going back into production starting in September. In fact, Amazon Prime says that no date has been set for the start of Season 4 production.

Coronavirus Crisis Spurs Access To Online Treatment For Opioid Addiction

Corrected on April 28, 2020

A previous version of this story misstated the percentage of Bright Heart Health patients who are still in recovery treatment for addiction after starting Bright Heart Health's program. We incorrectly said 90% after 90 days. In fact, according to the treatment provider, 90% of patients are still in treatment after 30 days, and 65% after 90 days.

Swedish Ambassador Says Stockholm Expected To Reach 'Herd Immunity' In May

Corrected on April 27, 2020

An earlier version of this story said the Swedish government is pursuing a strategy of "herd immunity." Swedish officials say their plan was to impose limited restrictions instead of a lockdown but have denied they were purposely pursuing a strategy of herd immunity.

Aftermath

Corrected on April 23, 2020

A previous version of this episode described Will Rogers as a musician. He was so much more. He's now just described as "famous".

Some Not-So-Small Companies Are Getting Small-Business Loans Under PPP

Corrected on April 23, 2020

An earlier version of the table above incorrectly listed Air T Inc. as having 769 employees because of incorrect information provided by Morgan Stanley. At the time of its loan application, Air T Inc. employed 478 people. The company's head count information was provided to NPR by Air T Inc. CFO Brian Ochocki.

The Last Sound

Corrected on April 17, 2020

In a previous version of this podcast, we referenced a song by Brazilian rapper Emicida but mistakenly played a song by a different Brazilian musician.

Lessons From Congress' Last Experience Helping Rescue An Economy In Free Fall

Corrected on April 16, 2020

In the audio of this story, as well as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly say Democrats took control of Congress after the 2008 elections. The party was already in the majority of both the Senate and the House, but the presidency did switch to the Democrats. In addition, we incorrectly say the stimulus bill that passed in February 2009 received no Republican votes. Although no House Republicans supported the bill, three GOP senators voted yes.

Retail Spending Just Fell Off A Cliff

Corrected on April 15, 2020

An earlier version of this story incorrectly said that Best Buy is temporarily furloughing 51,000 workers, including almost all part-time workers, and retaining 82% of its workforce. The furloughs apply to almost all part-time store workers and the company is retaining 82% of its hourly full-time store workforce.

Some Government Aid Checks Will Arrive This Week

Corrected on April 15, 2020

This podcast references a CDC study that shows a strong correlation between people staying home in San Francisco and the combination of two separate government actions — schools closings and President Trump's nationwide guidance to stay home on March 16.

The data showed a similar correlation in Seattle, New Orleans, and New York.

In San Francisco – on the same day — seven Bay Area counties issued stay-at-home orders.

Lobbyists Descend On Washington Seeking Coronavirus Relief Money

Corrected on April 14, 2020

Sheila Krumholz misspoke when she said about three-fourths of new registrations sent for the last month have cited COVID (as the reason) and are new to lobbying or haven't lobbied recently. She meant to say three-fourths of registrations sent for the last month that have cited COVID are by companies that are either new to lobbying or haven't lobbied in recent years.

All Things Considered

Unprecedented Relief Funds Stimulate Boom In Industry Lobbying For Relief Funds

Corrected on April 14, 2020

Sheila Krumholz misspoke when she said about three-fourths of new registrations sent for the last month have cited COVID (as the reason) and are new to lobbying or haven't lobbied recently. She meant to say three-fourths of registrations sent for the last month that have cited COVID are by companies that are either new to lobbying or haven't lobbied in recent years.

Unicorn Riding Scooter In Fatal Crash

Corrected on April 14, 2020

A previous version of this article paraphrased Byron Deeter as saying his company bought Twilio, Shopify, and Pinterest "on the cheap." Bessemer clarified that they believe their investments were fair market value

How Colleges Are Grading Students During Coronavirus

Corrected on April 12, 2020

An earlier version of this story said that students at Yale University successfully convinced the administration to switch to a Universal Pass grading system for the spring 2020 semester. It should have said a pass/fail system.

All Things Considered

Tips For Starting Or Continuing Mental Health Care From Home

Corrected on April 11, 2020

In this story, we incorrectly say 4 out of 5 American adults say the coronavirus pandemic has affected their mental health. It is actually 45% who reported a toll on their mental health.

Science Is For Everyone. Until It's Not.

Corrected on April 10, 2020

An earlier version of this episode incorrectly referred to the University of Wisconsin-Madison as the University of Madison-Wisconsin.

The 1918 Flu Pandemic Was Brutal, Killing More Than 50 Million People Worldwide

Corrected on April 4, 2020

In a previous version of this story, we incorrectly said a third of the world's population in 1918-1919 died of Spanish flu. Actually, a third of the world's population became infected. In addition, the story had quoted President Trump as saying those who had the Spanish flu had a 50/50 chance of survival. That number does not match what has been found by experts and government and private research institutions. Also, the story said academics generally agree that 50 to 100 million were infected. The most common estimate of Spanish flu cases is about 500 million

Relief Package A Good Start, Say Advocates For The Poor. But More Help Is Needed.

Corrected on March 31, 2020

An earlier version of this story said that the National Alliance to End Homelessness issued a report on the impact of coronavirus on the U.S. homeless population. The report was circulated by the group, but written by academics from the University of Pennsylvania, the University of California Los Angeles and Boston University.

1918 Flu

Corrected on March 30, 2020

A previous version of this episode incorrectly stated the factor by which the drop in average life expectancy in 1918 was greater than during a recent year from the opioid epidemic. This miscalculation has been removed from the audio.

White v. White?

Corrected on March 29, 2020

In a previous version of this podcast, we incorrectly referred to melanin as melatonin.

America Unemployed

Corrected on March 28, 2020

An earlier version of this story said the coronavirus rescue package would provide additional unemployment insurance payments for the four weeks. This has been corrected to say the additional payments are for the first four months.

All Things Considered

ICU Bed Capacity Varies Widely Nationwide

Corrected on March 26, 2020

A previous version of this story included a searchable database of ICU beds in hospital markets across the country. Due to a calculation error, the database underestimated the number of beds in some markets. Those markets included Nashville and Las Vegas regions that were cited in the story.

FACT CHECK: Trump Says 50,000 Could Die From Flu.

Corrected on March 25, 2020

The initial version of this story said the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated there have been about 23,000 deaths during the current flu season. That figure is at the lowest end of the CDC's estimated range, which extends to 59,000.

Morning Edition

Gov. Gavin Newsom Orders Californians To Stay At Home

Corrected on March 21, 2020

In this story, we incorrectly report that Gov. Gavin Newsom said 50% of California's population would get sick with the coronavirus over the next few months. He actually said 50% of the state's population would get infected with the coronavirus.

Morning Edition

News Brief: California Order, ProPublica Probe, Italy Pandemic Deaths

Corrected on March 21, 2020

In this story, we incorrectly report that Gov. Gavin Newsom said 50% of California's population would get sick with the coronavirus over the next few months. He actually said 50% of the state's population would get infected with the coronavirus.

All Things Considered

Coronavirus Forces Bureau To Suspend Census Field Operations Until April 1

Corrected on March 19, 2020

A previous version of this story said the Census Bureau is reducing the number of on-site workers at its processing center in Phoenix for paper census forms until April 1. In fact, that staffing change is happening only at two facilities in Jeffersonville, Ind.

American Socialist

Corrected on March 19, 2020

A previous version of this episode incorrectly said that Les Miserables was set during the French Revolution. The novel is set after the French Revolution.

Morning Edition

Iran Releases 85,000 Prisoners But Not Siamak Namazi

Corrected on March 18, 2020

In this story, as in a previous headline and Web introduction, we incorrectly say the Iranian government released 85,000 political prisoners. It released 85,000 prisoners, some of whom were political prisoners.

Global Deaths From Coronavirus Surpass 6,000

Corrected on March 16, 2020

An earlier version of this story erroneously said that Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Austria, Belgium and Greece have each had scores of coronavirus deaths. As of 9:11 p.m. ET on March 16, none of those countries has had more than six deaths. The earlier version also significantly overstated the number of coronavirus deaths in 11 other countries. The errors occurred due to NPR's misinterpretation of a World Health Organization chart. The incorrect numbers have been replaced with the most recent death counts reported on the coronavirus dashboard maintained by Johns Hopkins University's Center for Systems Science and Engineering.

All Things Considered

Coronavirus Is Making It Even Harder For The Census To Count Every U.S. Resident

Corrected on March 15, 2020

A previous version of this story said that because of the COVID-19 outbreak, the Census Bureau suggested in a letter that colleges and universities contact their students about how to get counted for the 2020 census online on their own. It would have been more accurate to say that suggestion was in regards only to students who usually live off campus. An earlier version also said that census workers are generally supposed to try to gather information from unresponsive households within six days. It would have been more accurate to say that workers generally have up to six days in total because the days do not have to be in consecutive order.

MAP: Confirmed Cases Of COVID-19

Corrected on March 13, 2020

In an update of this post on March 12, the total number of world cases was incorrectly tabulated at 200,000-plus. The number has been corrected in the post.

The Limits Of Empathy

Corrected on March 12, 2020

A previous version of the Web story incorrectly said that Alisha Gaines is an English professor at Duke University. She's actually at Florida State University.

Ask Me Another

Sibling Rivalries

Corrected on March 8, 2020

In a previous broadcast and digital version of this episode, we incorrectly refer to the Wachowskis as brothers, and use their former names. They are trans women and their names are Lana and Lilly.

Terms Of Service

Corrected on March 6, 2020

In an earlier version of this episode a source misidentified Senator John Thune as a Senator from North Dakota. He is a Senator from South Dakota.

Morning Edition

News Brief: Election Results, Stock Markets Drop, Gene-Editing Tool

Corrected on March 4, 2020

In this report, we incorrectly say that the Federal Reserve cut rates this week for the first time outside of a scheduled meeting. In fact, it was the first time since the financial crisis in 2008 that the Fed acted outside of a scheduled meeting.

Is This Love? Or Am I Gonna Fight A Lion?

Corrected on March 3, 2020

In the audio of this episode, we state that Lepidoptera is a "family" of butterflies. In fact, it is an "order" of butterflies, a larger taxonomic level.

All Things Considered

Stock Market Continues Plummet As Coronavirus Fears Continue Rise

Corrected on March 1, 2020

In this report, we incorrectly say that the week's stock market losses wiped out the previous year's gains. While the losses reversed part of the 2019 gains in the Dow Jones Industrial Average, they did not eliminate all of them.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Ohio Makes Plans To Allocate Eventual Opioid Settlement

Corrected on February 29, 2020

An earlier version of this story implied that a settlement agreement has been reached between Ohio and opioid manufacturers. There has been no agreement yet.

Some In Rural Florida Want Officials To Change Direction On Toll Roads

Corrected on February 27, 2020

A previous version of this story quoted Charles Lee of Audubon Florida as saying of the roads, "They would constitute the most disastrous single thing that's ever happened to the rural areas and the environment in the state of Florida." Lee was talking about the original legislation, which was later amended to add environmental protections and task forces to solicit public input.

Trump Appoints Pence To Lead Government's Coronavirus Response

Corrected on February 26, 2020

An earlier version of this story incorrectly said that the latest coronavirus case in the U.S. could be the first person-to-person transmission in the country. It should have said it could represent the first case of the virus spreading within the general population. The first person-to-person transmission of the virus actually took place last month.

Ask Me Another

This That Or The Other: Bond Girl Edition

Corrected on February 25, 2020

In this game, the category of Fortune 500 CEOs included Penny Pennington, of the financial firm Edward James. However, her official title is "Managing Partner." A spokesperson for the company explains, "Edward Jones is a privately held partnership and does not have a CEO. Having said that, the Managing Partner responsibilities are essentially the same as those of a CEO.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday Puzzle: Your Favorite Dessert

Corrected on February 23, 2020

A previous version on this puzzle featured the wrong challenge for this week. The information has been updated.

'Antarctica Melts,' NASA Says, Showing Effects Of A Record Warm Spell

Corrected on February 21, 2020

A previous version of this story incorrectly said the average temperatures on the Antarctic Peninsula has risen 3 degrees Celsius or 37.4 degrees Fahrenheit over the past half-century. The increase has actually been 3 degrees Celsius or 5.4 degrees Fahrenheit in that time.

How Warming Winters Are Affecting Everything

Corrected on February 21, 2020

A previous version of this story incorrectly referred to Jim White as the director of the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research. He is a former director.

Rosalía Returns To Her Roots With 'Juro Que'

Corrected on February 19, 2020

A previous version of this story described Rosalía's music as rooted in the Catalonia region of Spain. In fact, her work is rooted in the music of Andalusia, and borrows from Romani culture.

All Things Considered

U.S. Pressures Europe To Find Alternatives To Huawei

Corrected on February 16, 2020

A previous headline on this story incorrectly said Europe was pressuring the U.S. to find a low-cost alternative to Huawei. In fact, the U.S. was the one pressuring Europe.

Democrats Look Ahead, Elite Colleges Probed, CBP Chief Calls Agents 'Overzealous'

Corrected on February 15, 2020

A previous headline on this story incorrectly said the Border Patrol admitted mistakes in detaining Iranian Americans. It was actually the head of Customs and Border Protection who made the announcement referring to CBP officers. The Border Patrol, which is a separate agency under CBP, was not involved in the detentions.

Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick Ends His Presidential Bid

Corrected on February 12, 2020

In a previous version of this story, we said Deval Patrick was one of two African American men to become governor of a state. Patrick is one of two who were elected to the position; two others were elevated from lieutenant governorships.

A Look At A Solemn Dignified Transfer Ritual For Fallen Soldiers

Corrected on February 11, 2020

An earlier version of this story said that 'transfer case' is a term used by the military instead of casket or coffin. Transfer cases are used for transporting fallen military members to Dover Air Force Base. Afterwards, the remains are placed in caskets and transported to their final resting places.

Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

Corrected on February 11, 2020

A previous version of this story incorrectly said New Hampshire had the second-highest turnout in the 2016 general election. It had the third-highest turnout. The story also incorrectly said 48% of N.H. primary voters in 2004 identified as liberals. The number was actually 46%.

All Things Considered

Author Interview: 'Usual Cruelty'

Corrected on February 11, 2020

In this interview, and in a previous Web introduction, we incorrectly refer to the book Usual Cruelty: The Complicity of Lawyers in the Criminal Injustice System as Usual Cruelty: The Complacency of Lawyers in the Criminal Injustice System.

Updated on Feb. 12
In the previous correction, we incorrectly used the title Unusual Cruelty: The Complicity of Lawyers in the Criminal Injustice System. The full, correct title is Usual Cruelty: The Complicity of Lawyers in the Criminal Injustice System.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Remembering A Congressman Who Bucked His Party On An Impeachment

Corrected on February 10, 2020

An earlier version of this story mistakenly said that Rep. Tom Railsback's congressional district included Peoria, Illinois. Peoria was near his district but not in it. Also, an earlier version said Railsback was from the middle of Illinois; he was born in Moline, in the northwestern part of the state.

American With Coronavirus Dies At Hospital Near Center Of Epidemic

Corrected on February 8, 2020

A previous version of this story incorrectly called Wuhan a province in China. It's a city, the capital of Hubei province. In addition, a headline and the story had referred to the American who died as a man; the gender of that person has not been made known.

Where The 2020 Democrats Stand On Climate Change

Corrected on February 6, 2020

In this episode, we say that "nuclear energy generates about 20% of overall energy in the U.S." It would be more accurate to say that nuclear energy generates about 20% of overall electricity in the U.S.

What We Know About The App That Delayed Iowa's Caucus Results

Corrected on February 4, 2020

A previous version of this story incorrectly said Holly Christine Brown was appointed last week as the Asian/Pacific Islander caucus chair for the Iowa Democratic Party. Brown actually has been chair of her caucus for over a year but was appointed as a precinct chair last week.

What The 2020 Election Is All About

Corrected on February 2, 2020

An earlier version of this story incorrectly said George H.W. Bush and Jimmy Carter are the only two incumbent presidents to have lost in the last 30 years. The time period is 40 years.

Morning Edition

News Brief: Impeachment Trial, Coronavirus, U.K.-Huawei Deal

Corrected on January 30, 2020

In this story, NPR's Mara Liasson discusses what she says was a question asked by Democrats and answered by Alan Dershowitz. It was actually Republican Sen. Ted Cruz who asked the question.

All Things Considered

The Singing Snow Plow Driver Of Bozeman, Mont.

Corrected on January 29, 2020

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly imply that "Wichita Lineman" was written by Glen Campbell. It was written by Jimmy Webb, while Campbell was the first to record the song and make it famous.

Morning Edition

75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

Corrected on January 28, 2020

The initial radio version of this story featured one of the interviewees singing the song "Que Sera, Sera." She told us she sang that song to keep her spirits up during her imprisonment at Auschwitz. However, the song was first published in 1956. So, to avoid confusion, we removed that section in later broadcasts.

Everybody Knows Somebody

Corrected on January 27, 2020

A previous version of this episode incorrectly said that Anita Hill came forward to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee during the confirmation hearings for Clarence Thomas' appointment to the Supreme Court. She was subpoenaed to testify before the committee.

The Experience In, And Of, David Olney's Beloved Songs

Corrected on January 26, 2020

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that David Olney studied literature at the University of Carolina. There is no such school. Olney studied at the University of North Carolina.

Morning Edition

6 Men Successfully Cross Drake Passage In A Rowboat

Corrected on January 26, 2020

No official organization certifies which journey is considered the first human-powered row across the Drake Passage. A similar rowing expedition across the Drake Passage took place in 1988 and was led by Ned Gillette. The crew members used a sail at the start to help move their rowing craft from the rocky shore. The team rowed to Antarctica's outer islands, not its main peninsula.

All Things Considered

Peace Corps To End China Program

Corrected on January 25, 2020

In this audio, and in a previous introduction, based on information from congressional press releases, we incorrectly say Peace Corps volunteers will no longer be in China starting this summer. In fact, the China program will end in 2021.

PHOTOS: What It's Like Living Through An Outbreak

Corrected on January 25, 2020

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that workers in Seoul, South Korea, sprayed disinfectant in a train that came from Wuhan, China. The virus originated in Wuhan, not the train.

Got Impeachment Trial Milk? These Senators Do

Corrected on January 23, 2020

A caption with a previous version of this story incorrectly identified Sen. Jim Jeffords as an independent in 1999. At the time, he was a Republican. In 2001, he left the party to become an independent.

Most Americans Are Lonely, And Our Workplace Culture May Not Be Helping

Corrected on January 23, 2020

In a previous version of this story, we incorrectly said the survey found a 7% rise in loneliness since 2018. It was a nearly 13% rise. In addition, citing a draft version of the report, we incorrectly said that 72% of very heavy social media users were lonely, as compared with 51% of light users. The correct numbers, per the final report, are 73% and 52% respectively.

All Things Considered

Gun Rights Activists Descend On Virginia Capitol

Corrected on January 23, 2020

This story incorrectly identifies a speaker at the rally as Jeff Katz. In fact, the comments were made by Erich Pratt of Gun Owners of America.

Can You Name Five Fine Artists That Are Women?

Corrected on January 22, 2020

In the original version of this episode, we incorrectly said that the Baltimore Museum of Art will be opening its Joan Mitchell exhibition this April. The exhibition is actually scheduled to open this September.

Morning Edition

Psychologists Who Helped Develop CIA Torture Program To Testify In Sept. 11 Case

Corrected on January 21, 2020

A previous version of the headline and Web summary said that pretrial hearings and testimony would begin Tuesday at the U.S. military court in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. In fact, those have been ongoing, and it's the testimony of two psychologists that is planned starting Tuesday.

Trump Says Iran Is 'Standing Down,' Vows To Continue Pressure

Corrected on January 9, 2020

An earlier version of this story incorrectly said the nuclear agreement with Iran limited Iran's ability to pursue nuclear weapons in return for millions of dollars of Iranian assets that had been held by the United States. The amount was billions of dollars.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday Puzzle: Supermarket Wordplay

Corrected on January 5, 2020

This week's puzzle has been updated to replace a previously incorrect clue.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Ofra Bloch On 'Afterward'

Corrected on January 5, 2020

In this report, as well as in a previous Web introduction, we incorrectly say that Ofra Bloch is the granddaughter of Holocaust survivors. She grew up in Jerusalem, where she was surrounded by Holocaust survivors.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Thousands Mourn Soleimani In Baghdad

Corrected on January 4, 2020

In this story, we incorrectly say that as of Saturday, the State Department was urging Americans to leave Pakistan, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain.

7 Women's Health Topics We Need To Talk About In 2020

Corrected on January 2, 2020

A previous version of this story incorrectly gave the title of the book Periods Gone Public: Taking A Stand For Menstrual Equity as Periods Gone Public: Taking A Stand For Menstrual Equality.

Grim And Hopeful Global Trends To Watch In 2020 (And Fold Into A Zine)

Corrected on January 2, 2020

An earlier version of this story misspelled Matt Deitsch's last name as Diestch. Also, three things that happened in 2019 were mistakenly said to have happened "this year": the dozen countries that reported cases of vaccine-derived polio; the freezing and reinstatement of aid to El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras; and NPR's interview with Matt Deitsch. Additionally, the new dengue vaccine is expected for this year, not next year.