NPR Corrections

NPR corrects significant errors in broadcast and online reports. Corrections of errors will be made in audio archives, written transcripts and on the website. To report an error, please use our corrections form.

Photos: Scenes From 9/11 National Memorials

Corrected on September 11, 2021

Because of incorrect information from Getty Images, a caption on a previous version of this story misspelled Charlie Greene's last name as Green.

Weekend Edition Saturday

A Haven For Soviet Rock And Roll Is Long Gone But Its Music Still Resonates

Corrected on September 2, 2021

A photo caption incorrectly described a concert by the band Alisa as taking place in the Leningrad Rock Club. The concert took place in a larger venue as part of a Leningrad Rock Club festival amid the emerging freedoms of the perestroika era

All Things Considered

Plaquemines Parish President Hunkers Down Through Hurricane Ida With Members

Corrected on August 30, 2021

An earlier headline mistakenly referenced the president of New Orleans Parish. This interview is with the president of Plaquemines Parish. Louisiana doesn't have a parish named New Orleans Parish. Additionally, an earlier summary of this report incorrectly said the interview was about the impact of Hurricane Ida on New Orleans. In fact, it was about the impact on Plaquemines Parish.

Reports Of Cheating At Colleges Soar During The Pandemic

Corrected on August 27, 2021

A previous version of this story incorrectly said Tricia Bertram Gallant was affiliated with the University of California, Santa Barbara. In fact, she researches academic integrity at the University of California, San Diego.

Nanci Griffith Has Died. The Texas Singer-Songwriter Was 68

Corrected on August 14, 2021

A previous version of this story said Nanci Griffith had been married to Eric Anderson. In fact, she had been married to Eric Taylor. In addition, in one instance, the story misspelled her name as Griffiths.

Morning Edition

The Delta Variant Isn't As Contagious As Chickenpox. But It's Still Highly Contagious

Corrected on August 13, 2021

In an earlier version of this story, evolutionary biologist and biostatistician Tom Wenseleers at the University of Leuven in Belgium stated that the delta variant of the coronavirus was "probably the most contagious respiratory virus that we know, for the moment." Wenseleers clarifies that he was referring to viruses that primarily affect the respiratory tract. Although the primary infection with measles occurs in other tissues besides the respiratory tract, measles can cause a runny nose and sneezing. Its R0 factor makes it more contagious than the delta variant.

Weekend Edition Saturday

More Than 100 Falsified Ship Locations Cause Confusion At Sea

Corrected on August 11, 2021

This report omits part of Bjorn Bergman's full quote that clarifies falsified tracks were found not only in the contested waters of Russian-occupied Crimea but also "within Russian waters."

All Things Considered

Why Reports Of Menstrual Changes After COVID Vaccine Are Tough To Study

Corrected on August 10, 2021

An earlier version of the web story incorrectly described the three COVID-19 vaccines available for use in the United States as U.S.-approved. In fact, they have been authorized for emergency use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Fresh Air

Remembering Inventor And TV Pitchman Ron Popeil

Corrected on August 9, 2021

In the audio, as in a previous web version, we incorrectly say Terry Gross spoke with Ron Popeil in 1993. Their interview was in 1996.

All Things Considered

The Dacha Is Russia's Summer Cure For Urban Life

Corrected on August 9, 2021

The first version of this story misspelled the surnames of Vladimir Beresnev and Tatyana Beresneva. The correct spellings are Berestnev and Berestneva.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday Puzzle: Accented Syllable

Corrected on August 8, 2021

In this week's puzzle with Will Shortz, the clue "Singer Robert who won a Tony for his role in 'Camelot'," should have read "Singer Robert who won a Tony for his role in 'The Happy Time'."

The Origin of Value: The Greater Fools Theory

Corrected on August 7, 2021

An exchange between the host and guest used confusing language that left open multiple interpretations, including that Bitcoin existed in the 1990s. The first bitcoin was mined in 2009.

To Remember The Moment, Try Taking Fewer Photos

Corrected on August 5, 2021

An earlier version of this story misattributed the tip about taking a few photos and then putting down your camera to Nathaniel Barr. The tip is from Linda Henkel.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Opinion: New Jersey Renames Its Rest Stops As A Nation Rethinks Monuments

Corrected on July 31, 2021

A previous introduction on this story incorrectly said New Jersey would be renaming rest stops on the New Jersey Turnpike after illustrious state residents. There is no more room for rest stop honors on the turnpike; the nine new names will be memorialized on the Garden State Parkway.

The First 100 Videos Played On MTV

Corrected on July 30, 2021

A previous version of this story incorrectly said the golden age of MTV began with its inception in 1989. The station first planted its flag in 1981.

Morning Edition

How The Olympic Medal Table Explains The World

Corrected on July 28, 2021

An earlier version of this story mistakenly said 1992's Unified Team comprised the 15 former Soviet states. It comprised 12 of the 15.

Weekend Edition Sunday

German Bike Program Helps Refugee Women Acclimate To New Community

Corrected on July 27, 2021

As the story states, women in this program said they were prevented from riding bikes by social pressure. The story did not mean to imply that all of their home countries outlaw bike riding by girls.

Olympics: Behind The Five Rings

Corrected on July 26, 2021

An earlier version of this podcast episode did not say that the 1976 Olympics referred to in Montreal were the Summer Olympics.

Teens Asked, We Answered: The Truth About COVID-19 Vaccines

Corrected on July 24, 2021

A previous version of this story incorrectly said the drug additive polyethylene glycol is in the Moderna and J&J vaccines. It is in the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

All Things Considered

Beneath Istanbul, Archaeologists Explore An Ancient City's Byzantine Basements

Corrected on July 24, 2021

In a previous version of this story, a quote was incorrectly phrased to say the corridors under the mosques were in bad shape because of inattention. The quote was actually referring to documents used to identify the structures and not the structures themselves. In addition, the story incorrectly identified Arzu Ulas as a graduate student at Istanbul University. She pursued her undergraduate degree at Istanbul University but is currently with Fatih Sultan Mehmet Vakif University.

Morning Edition

The Life Cycle Of A COVID-19 Vaccine Lie

Corrected on July 20, 2021

A previous version of this web story mischaracterized the survey of experiences with menstruation and the vaccine as only including women. In fact, the survey includes people who menstruate or have in the past. In addition, the story incorrectly labeled the authors of this study as medical anthropologists. They are biological anthropologists.

All Things Considered

Outrage As A Business Model: How Ben Shapiro Is Using Facebook To Build An Empire

Corrected on July 19, 2021

A previous version of this story mistakenly referenced an out-of-date rating – 34.5/100 – by the company NewsGuard. The company's most recent rating of The Daily Wire is 57/100 and notes that the site "often misstates facts in articles that advance conservative opinion, including in stories about COVID-19."

How We'll Know When The COVID-19 Crisis Is Over

Corrected on July 12, 2021

An earlier version of this story said the national emergency for COVID-19 that was declared on March 13, 2020, has been renewed several times. In fact, it is the public health emergency that was declared in January 2020 that has been renewed several times.

What Led A Police Chief Turned Yoga Instructor To The Capitol Riot?

Corrected on July 7, 2021

An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that the online announcement describing a "collaboration" between the Dhillon Law Group, the Center for American Liberty, and the American Phoenix Project was removed after NPR's inquiries. In fact, the announcement was removed on Jan. 12, prior to NPR contacting the Dhillon Law Group.

That Time America Paid For Universal Day Care

Corrected on July 1, 2021

A previous version of this episode incorrectly said that during World War II, Congress set aside tens of billions of dollars to cover a child care program. In fact, it was tens of millions, which in today's money would be about $1.2 billion.

Fresh Air

Ta-Nehisi Coates On Police Brutality, The Confederate Flag And Forgiveness

Corrected on June 28, 2021

In the audio of this story, we incorrectly said Ta-Nehisi Coates won a 2015 National Magazine Award for his Atlantic story "The Case For Reparations." Coates was a finalist for the "Essays and Criticism" prize in 2015. He won the National Magazine Award for "Essays and Criticism" in 2013 for his Atlantic article "Fear of a Black President."

In addition, a previous headline misspelled Coates' last name as Coab.

Richard Altuna, Who Redesigned What Retail Looks Like, Dies At 70

Corrected on June 25, 2021

An earlier version of this story incorrectly said Richard Altuna died from the Zika virus, based on a statement from a family friend. His sister told NPR that Altuna had contracted West Nile virus. And the location of the funeral chapel was incorrectly identified as Lake Forest, Calif. The chapel is in Tustin, Calif.

Yep, We Made Up Vegetables

Corrected on June 24, 2021

An earlier version of this episode said that Brussels sprouts came from auxiliary buds. They actually come from axillary buds. The audio has been updated.

All Things Considered

The USDA Is Set To Give Black Farmers Debt Relief. They've Heard That One Before

Corrected on June 21, 2021

An earlier version of this report incorrectly said that "Harvard University researchers estimate Black farmers in the South have lost 90% of their land in the last century, amounting to a loss of $250 billion to $350 billion of accumulated wealth and income." In fact, the researchers presented at Harvard but are affiliated with several universities and the U.S. Census Bureau. Together, they call themselves the Land Loss and Reparations Project. And a previous version of this story incorrectly said 169 Black farmers received debt relief under the Pigford settlement. It was actually 425.

All Things Considered

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Directs Fiery Essay At Former Student — And Cancel Culture

Corrected on June 19, 2021

A previous version of this story quoted a 2017 interview that was incorrectly attributed to "BBC Channel 4" and a BBC interviewer. The BBC and Channel 4 are separate public television services in the United Kingdom. The interview described was from Channel 4.

Previously corrected on June 17

A previous version of this piece incorrectly stated Akwaeke Emezi's gender. They identify as nonbinary.

All Things Considered

Snapchat Ends 'Speed Filter' That Critics Say Encouraged Reckless Driving

Corrected on June 17, 2021

A previous version of this story gave an incorrect timeline for when a number of car crashes linked to the "speed filter" occurred. The crashes in Georgia and Philadelphia both took place in 2015, not 2016. The Florida crash took place the following year, in 2016.

America's Top Evangelical Group Is Deciding If They're Further Right Than Trump

Corrected on June 16, 2021

A previous version of this story incorrectly said Russell Moore, a former president of the SBC's Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, posted recordings from an internal meeting. In fact, the person who posted the audio was Phillip Bethancourt, a former vice president of the ERLC. The story also incorrectly referred to the Chandler School of Theology. The proper title is Candler School of Theology.

Portrait Of The Outlaw As A Young Man: 'True History Of The Kelly Gang'

Corrected on June 16, 2021

A previous version of this story mixed up the law enforcement roles played by Nicholas Hoult and Charlie Hunman. Hoult played the exploitative British constable, and Hunman played the abusive local policeman.

Previously corrected on April 24, 2019

An earlier version of this review incorrectly stated that George MacKay had appeared in Game of Thrones.

All Things Considered

How One Kenyan Tribe Produces The World's Best Runners

Corrected on June 16, 2021

An earlier version of this story incorrectly identified David Epstein as a senior editor at Sports Illustrated. At the time this story was published, he had recently changed jobs from senior writer at Sports Illustrated to reporter with ProPublica.

An earlier version of this story also stated incorrectly that David Epstein told NPR that if one could measure the ankles and calves of runners at the Olympic starting line, one could statistically predict the winner. Epstein said that the Kalenjin tend to have extremely thin ankles and extremely thin calves, which improves their running economy.

An earlier version also stated academics told Epstein they had evidence of genetic advantage among different groups they wouldn't share. In fact, Epstein said academics had evidence of genetic differences unrelated to ability they wouldn't publish.

How California Homelessness Became A Crisis

Corrected on June 11, 2021

A previous version of this article incorrectly stated the 1994 rent control law in San Francisco "resulted in a 25% decline in the supply of rentals in the city." Before 1994, large apartment buildings in the city already had rent control. The 1994 law expanded rent control to small, multifamily buildings. The researchers found that, of those properties that fell under the new rent control law, there was a 15% decline in rental supply and a 25% decline in rent-controlled supply in the years that followed.

A Growing Number Of Critics Raise Alarms About The Electoral College

Corrected on June 10, 2021

An earlier version of this story included a misspoken quote that said people in Wyoming have 44 times the power of people in California in presidential elections. In fact, people in Wyoming have nearly four times the power of people in California.

Once Banned, For-Profit Medical Schools Are On The Rise Again In The U.S.

Corrected on June 7, 2021

A previous version of this story incorrectly said the Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation would determine in August whether to accredit a proposed medical school in Billings, Mont. The commission will take up the question of accreditation in August, but a decision will come later.

All Things Considered

Sackler Family Empire Poised To Win Immunity From Opioid Lawsuits

Corrected on June 3, 2021

An earlier version of this story was unclear about allegations against members of the Sackler family. The story has been clarified to state that a brief filed in the bankruptcy case argues that allegations leveled by the Justice Department last October could raise the question of whether some members of the Sackler family could be held responsible for crimes Purdue admitted to.

Why Democrats Are Angry At Wall Street

Corrected on May 30, 2021

An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that the Democrats control all three branches of government. In fact, they control the White House and Congress.

BTS And Beyond: A Guide To K-Pop

Corrected on May 28, 2021

The original version of this episode erroneously stated that the artist BoA was 11 years old when she made her debut in 2000. She was actually 13.

All Things Considered

George Floyd's Impact On The Fight For Racial Justice

Corrected on May 28, 2021

In this report, attorney Andrea Ritchie asserts that "thousands of officers get away with killing people without consequences every year in this country." While there's no reliable data to determine how many officers participate in killing members of the U.S. public annually, data suggests that police kill about 1,000 people a year. Ritchie's assertion that the officers get away "without consequences" is also challenging to prove. When we heard concerns after the interview, we contacted Ritchie to ask her to explain her assertion, and she said she meant without arrest or prosecution. According to the Henry A. Wallace Police Crime Database, since 2005, 142 officers have been arrested on charges of murder or manslaughter in the shooting and killing of someone while on duty. Philip Stinson, who leads this research, says 44 out of those 142 officers have been convicted of a crime: Seven officers were ultimately convicted of murder, 23 of varying degrees of manslaughter and five of varying levels of homicide, and the others were charged with lesser offenses. Officers also face other consequences, including being fired, demoted or placed on leave, which are not tracked nationally and are difficult to quantify.

6 Charts That Dismantle The Trope Of Asian Americans As A Model Minority

Corrected on May 28, 2021

A previous version of this story incorrectly said that a Pew Research Center study about income inequality among Asian Americans was from 2016. The correct year is 2018.

Previously posted on May 26: An earlier version also mistakenly said people of East Asian and South Asian descent make up the largest shares of Asian Americans. People of East Asian and Southeast Asian descent make up the two largest shares.

What's Changed — And What Hasn't — In The Year Since George Floyd Was Killed

Corrected on May 28, 2021

In a previous version of this report, attorney Andrea Ritchie asserted that "thousands of officers get away with killing people without consequences every year in this country." While there's no reliable data to determine how many officers participate in killing members of the U.S. public annually, data suggests that police kill about 1,000 people a year. Ritchie's assertion that the officers get away "without consequences" is also challenging to prove. When we heard concerns after the interview, we contacted Ritchie to ask her to explain her assertion, and she said she meant without arrest or prosecution. According to the Henry A. Wallace Police Crime Database, since 2005, 142 officers have been arrested on charges of murder or manslaughter in the shooting and killing of someone while on duty. Philip Stinson, who leads this research, says 44 out of those 142 officers have been convicted of a crime: Seven officers were ultimately convicted of murder, 23 of varying degrees of manslaughter and five of varying levels of homicide, and the others were charged with lesser offenses. Officers also face other consequences, including being fired, demoted or placed on leave, which are not tracked nationally and are difficult to quantify.

Weekend Edition Sunday

The Army Is Expanding Allowed Hairstyles For Women

Corrected on May 24, 2021

In the audio version of this report, we incorrectly say that Fort Sam is in Houston. Fort Sam is an informal name for Fort Sam Houston, which is in San Antonio. Separately, the original digital story said the newest change applies to enlisted female soldiers. In fact, it applies to all female soldiers.

War Poems Revisited

Corrected on May 21, 2021

A previous version of this episode incorrectly called a poem by the 13th century poet Saadi an Afghan poem. It is a Persian poem.

Demi Lovato Comes Out As Nonbinary

Corrected on May 19, 2021

A previous version of this story stated that Demi Lovato is a two-time Grammy winner. They are a two-time nominee.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Music Professor David Rothenberg Makes Music With Cicadas

Corrected on May 16, 2021

An earlier headline misspelled David Rothenberg's last name as Rothenburg.

A previous broadcast version of this report called cicadas leaf-eaters. In fact, they do not eat leaves.

All Things Considered

Behind The Humanitarian Crisis Caused By The Civil War In Ethiopia

Corrected on May 13, 2021

In this piece, we incorrectly translate part of an interview with Senait as saying she was chained for about a month. Senait says she was held captive for about one month but that she was tied for nine days.

CDC Says Kids As Young As 12 Should Get The Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine

Corrected on May 12, 2021

An earlier version of this story mistakenly said COVID-19 vaccines have been approved in the United States. The Food and Drug Administration has granted emergency use authorization for certain age groups but has not approved COVID-19 vaccines for any age group.

What We Know About The Ransomware Attack On A Critical U.S. Pipeline

Corrected on May 10, 2021

A previous version of this story incorrectly said that a purported press release from DarkSide claimed the group is prepared to attack hospitals, schools and universities, nonprofit organizations and the government sector. The press release in fact said DarkSide would not attack such targets, because of "our principles."

NPR's 50 Favorite Songs Of 1971

Corrected on May 5, 2021

A previous version of this story misspelled the last name of Bernard Purdie and misidentified Charles "Skip" Pitts as Charles "Skip" James. It also incorrectly stated that The Rolling Stones' "Wild Horses" was recorded at FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, Ala. It was recorded at Muscle Shoals Sound Studio.

104 Days Of Bidenonomics

Corrected on May 4, 2021

A previous version of this story mistakenly said the proposed paid family and medical leave program would provide those on leave with up to $4,000 a week. It has been corrected to say it would provide them with up to $4,000 a month.

Morning Edition

24 States Mount Legal Fight To Block Sackler Bid For Opioid Immunity

Corrected on May 4, 2021

A previous version of this story said that 25 state attorneys general filed the brief. It has been corrected to 24 state attorneys general and the attorney general of the District of Columbia filed it, since D.C. is not a state.

Channel Your Inner Wildlife Photographer And Chill Out With 'New Pokémon Snap'

Corrected on April 30, 2021

A previous version of this story contained an inaccurate description of the original Pokémon Snap, including details and creatures that were not part of the game. The passage combined memories of the game with details taken from a fan-made YouTube video that also contained actual gameplay.

Morning Edition

Here's How The 1st 2020 Census Results Changed Electoral College, House Seats

Corrected on April 26, 2021

An earlier web and radio version of this story misattributed a quote from Kristin Koslap, senior technical expert on 2020 census congressional apportionment in the Census Bureau's Population Division, to Karen Battle, chief of the bureau's Population Division.

The Writers Revolt (UPDATE)

Corrected on April 22, 2021

A previous version of this story referred to HBO's newest streaming service as HBO Now. The name of that service is HBO Max.

2021 Oscars Guide: Documentary Features

Corrected on April 20, 2021

The original version of this episode erroneously stated that The Mole Agent takes place in San Francisco. The documentary was primarily filmed in Chile.

All Things Considered

Dredging Plan Threatens Sea Turtles In Georgia

Corrected on April 16, 2021

An earlier headline incorrectly suggested that shipping channels may threaten the actual beaches where sea turtles nest.

Ask Me Another

Alternative 80s

Corrected on April 12, 2021

In the clue about the Sistine Chapel, we asked, "In what '80s was the Sistine Chapel completed?" Construction of the chapel was completed in the 1480s. However, the lyrics in the clue reference the frescoes within the chapel, focusing on Michelangelo's famous work on the ceiling. While some of the chapel's frescoes were completed in the 1480s, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling until the 1500s.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Politics Chat: The 2020 Election Is Over, But Issues Remain

Corrected on April 11, 2021

In an earlier version of this conversation, we said, "In Maryland, the Democratic legislature and Republican governor just signed — passed and signed into law a package of police reform bills. Not every one the Democrats had passed." Gov. Larry Hogan allowed part of the package to become law without his signature and vetoed other provisions. The legislature overrode his vetoes.

Virginia 16th State To Legalize Recreational Pot, Latest To Emphasize 'Social Equity'

Corrected on April 7, 2021

A previous version of this story said Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam had initially proposed the law take effect Jan. 1, 2024. In fact, the legislature set that date, a year later than Northam first proposed.

Correction: A previous version of this story incorrectly referred to Tommy Norment as Virginia's Senate majority leader. Norment is the state Senate minority leader.

Morning Edition

Second City Still Funny At 50

Corrected on April 6, 2021

A previous Web introduction to this report incorrectly spelled Dan Aykroyd's last name as Ackroyd. The reference has been removed.

The Land of the Fee

Corrected on March 30, 2021

A previous version of this episode incorrectly said that the Senate voted against raising the minimum wage. Changing the minimum wage was not included in the Covid-19 relief bill on the advice of the Senate parliamentarian.

Want To Listen Better? Turn Down Your Thoughts And Tune In To Others

Corrected on March 30, 2021

An earlier version of this story said that CommunicationFIRST defends the civil rights of people with disabilities that affect their ability to communicate verbally. In fact, the organization serves members with speech-related communication disabilities.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Lordstown Motors Faces Skepticism From Investors

Corrected on March 25, 2021

The audio, and a previous version of the digital story, stated the Hindenburg Research report triggered inquiries from the Securities and Exchange Commission; in fact, those inquiry began before the report was publicly issued.

Morning Edition

'Last Soul Company' Details The Story Of Malaco Records

Corrected on March 23, 2021

A previous Web introduction to this report incorrectly said that Malaco Records is the oldest continuously run independent record label in America. In fact, it's one of the oldest.

Fresh Air

Loretta Lynn Traces Her Roots From 'Coal Miner's Daughter' To Country Stardom

Corrected on March 21, 2021

The audio of this interview, originally broadcast in 2010, says that Loretta Lynn was married at age 13, as Lynn wrote in her memoir, Coal Miner's Daughter. However, in 2012 The Associated Press reported that Lynn is three years older than she had stated and married a few months before she turned 16.

IRS Postpones Tax Filing Deadline To May 17

Corrected on March 18, 2021

An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that the coronavirus relief package makes the first $10,200 in unemployment insurance collected in 2019 tax-exempt for many recipients. In fact, it applies to unemployment insurance collected in 2020.

The Agony And Subversion Of The 'Promising Young Woman' Ending

Corrected on March 18, 2021

An earlier version of this piece misstated the plot of the I May Destroy You finale as depicting Arabella's various fantasies about the night of her attack. The events depict Arabella's fantasies of enacting revenge on her attacker.

Escapism, Not Escape, At A Grammy Night Defined By Exceptions

Corrected on March 16, 2021

An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that Bad Bunny's win for best Latin pop or urban album was the first time a Latin category was included in the main Grammys broadcast. The story also implied that Bad Bunny delivered his acceptance speech entirely in Spanish; in fact, it was in both Spanish and English.

Morning Edition

Scientists Find New Invasive Mosquito Species In Florida

Corrected on March 16, 2021

In the audio, and a previous version of the digital story, Lindsay Campbell says, "If you end up with a species that's capable of transmitting to bats and likes to also bite humans, that's the prime condition for a spillover event." Campbell misspoke and meant to say birds. Mosquito-borne diseases are not known to be transmitted between bats and people.

Twice As Many White Alabamans Are Getting COVID-19 Vaccinations As Black Alabamans

Corrected on March 16, 2021

In this report, we incorrectly say Alabama Regional Medical Services had not yet received any doses of COVID-19 vaccine. In fact, the clinic says it received its first vaccines from the Jefferson County Health Department on Feb. 19 and its first shipment of vaccines from the state allocation on March 8.

All Things Considered

Alabama Official On Vaccine Rollout: 'How Can This Disparity Exist In This Country?'

Corrected on March 11, 2021

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that Alabama Regional Medical Services, a clinic in Birmingham, Ala., had not yet received any doses of the coronavirus vaccine. In fact, ARMS says it received its first vaccines from the Jefferson County Health Department on Feb. 19 and its first shipment of vaccine from the state allocation on March 8.

All Things Considered

Roblox Goes Public — What's Roblox? Ask Anyone With Kids.

Corrected on March 9, 2021

A previous version of this story incorrectly said the Lil Nas X concert took place in December 2020. In fact, it took place in November. Also, a previous version implied that the game "Adopt Me" was developed by Roblox. While "Adopt Me" is playable on the Roblox platform, Roblox didn't develop it.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Pope Francis Closes Out Trip To Iraq

Corrected on March 7, 2021

A previous version of this report incorrectly said that much of Iraqi Kurdistan was formerly controlled by the Islamic State and that Mosul is part of Iraqi Kurdistan. In fact, the Islamic State didn't take over much of Iraqi Kurdistan, and Mosul is not part of Iraqi Kurdistan.

Economy Latest, Asylum Policy, Chinese Parliament on Hong Kong

Corrected on March 5, 2021

The audio of this podcast reports that the Biden administration is converting three detention centers into migrant processing centers. They are converting two. The move has not been officially announced, but was confirmed through reporting from NPR's Franco Ordoñez.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Former Gymnast Sarah Klein Discusses Coach John Geddert's Sex Abuse Charges

Corrected on March 2, 2021

In this story, we incorrectly say that the United States Olympic & Paralympic Committee did not respond to requests for comment. It was the International Olympic Committee, not the USOPC, that did not respond.

The IOC referred the request to the USOPC on March 1, and CEO Sarah Hirshland offered this comment: "It's the voices of the survivors that matter most at this time. They continue to show bravery and strength in the most difficult circumstances — including today's events," Hirshland said, referencing the charges filed against John Geddert and his death.

Previously posted March 1: In this report, we incorrectly say John Geddert died on Friday, Feb. 26. In fact, he died on Thursday, Feb. 25.

Morning Edition

Widespread Alcohol Abuse Clouds Mongolia's Future

Corrected on March 1, 2021

An earlier Web version of this story incorrectly said Mongolia became independent from the Soviet Union in 1990. In fact, Mongolia was never part of the Soviet Union.

Morning Edition

Post Makes Custom Box Of Fruity Pebbles For Cereal-Loving Cat

Corrected on February 26, 2021

In the audio of this story and in a previous Web introduction, we incorrectly say Trash Panda was adopted in Fulton County, Ga. The cereal-loving celebrity cat actually calls the Midwest home. He lives in Fulton County, Ill.

Magnets: The Hidden Objects Powering Your Life

Corrected on February 26, 2021

An earlier version of this episode incorrectly described the role magnets play in creating sound in speakers. It has since been updated to explain it correctly.

All Things Considered

Remembering U-Roy, Jamaican Dancehall Icon

Corrected on February 23, 2021

In this report, we incorrectly say that the Whatz Up TV interview with U-Roy and DJ Kool Herc took place in 2013. It was actually recorded in 2004.

Ask Me Another

Raining Hamiltons

Corrected on February 22, 2021

In this episode, we incorrectly say that Aaron Burr refers to Alexander Hamilton as the $10 Founding Father in the musical Hamilton. In fact, the line in the musical is said by the actor who plays John Laurens and Philip Hamilton.

Price Check: Nations Pay Wildly Different Prices For Vaccines

Corrected on February 21, 2021

In an earlier version of this post, the government of India was credited for donating some doses of the vaccine to Trinidad and Tobago. In fact, India donated doses to Barbados, which distributed batches of them to several of its Caribbean neighbors.

Metropolitan Opera Backstage Workers: 'Without People, The Opera Is Nothing'

Corrected on February 19, 2021

A previous version of this story incorrectly attributed a statement to Metropolitan Opera general manager Peter Gelb. The statement came from the Met's press office. In addition, we incorrectly stated that negotiations had yet to begin between the Met and its two musicians' unions. In fact, negotiations have begun with the American Guild of Musical Artists (AGMA).

Son Of Prominent Conservative Activist Charged In Capitol Riot

Corrected on February 19, 2021

An earlier version of this story, relying on court documents, noted that a witness informed the FBI that Bozell was a girls' basketball coach at the Hershey Christian Academy. After publication, the school stated that this information was incorrect, and Bozell has never been a coach at the school.

Morning Edition

13,150,080 Minutes: It's Been 25 Years Since The First Performance Of 'Rent'

Corrected on February 19, 2021

The previous headline on this story, "13,140,000 Minutes: It's Been 25 Years Since The First Performance Of 'Rent,'" referenced a lyric from the song "Seasons of Love": Five hundred twenty five thousand six hundred minutes / How do you measure? Measure a year? However, not all years have 525,600 minutes. Leap years have 527,040 minutes. There have been seven leap years in the last 25 years, and thus the headline has been changed to "13,150,080 Minutes: It's Been 25 Years Since The First Performance Of 'Rent.'"

Steps Of The Senate Impeachment Trial: What Happens Before Final Vote

Corrected on February 12, 2021

In a previous version of this story, opening statements made by Trump lawyer Michael van der Veen were mistakenly attributed to Bruce Castor Jr. These statements included characterizing the trial as "political vengeance" that is part of a years-long "witch hunt."

Morning Edition

Historic Portraits, Including 1 Of Susan B. Anthony, Discovered In Attic

Corrected on February 10, 2021

An earlier version of the audio of this report incorrectly said that Susan B. Anthony helped organize the women's rights convention in Seneca Falls. She did not organize that convention.

Clarification, previously posted Feb. 9: An earlier version of this report used the word "suffragette," a word that can have a negative connotation. It has been replaced with "suffragist."

Morning Edition

Up For Sale: 'Possibly The Thinnest House In London'

Corrected on February 9, 2021

A previous Web introduction to this report incorrectly said that the house had an asking price of $1.3 billion. In fact, the price is $1.3 million.

Moderna Increases COVID-19 Vaccine Shipments While Pfizer Lags Behind

Corrected on February 8, 2021

An earlier version of this online story said there was insufficient transparency around the supply of Shingrix shingles vaccine in 2009, but a former official with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention clarified to NPR that the problem that year was with flu vaccine. Issues with Shingrix occurred in subsequent years.

Morning Edition

'An American Project': For Decades, Dawoud Bey Has Chronicled Black Life

Corrected on February 3, 2021

A previous version of this story said the exhibition was at the High Museum of American Art. It should have said the High Museum of Art. Also, the story originally said that Trayvon Martin was killed by a police officer. In fact, George Zimmerman, the man who killed Martin, was a neighborhood watch volunteer at the time of the shooting.

All Things Considered

Early Data Shows Striking Racial Disparities In Who's Getting The COVID-19 Vaccine

Corrected on January 29, 2021

A previous version of this Web story mistakenly said that 15% of Black people in Mississippi and 15% of Hispanic people in Texas have been vaccinated. In fact, 15% of those who have been vaccinated in Mississippi are Black, while 15% of those vaccinated in Texas are Hispanic.

The College Buyout Boom

Corrected on January 27, 2021

In an earlier version of this episode, we said Pennsylvania State University had closed some of its regional campuses. This is incorrect. Penn State has not closed any of its campuses. We have removed the language related to that error.

Morning Edition

He Saved 669 Children From Nazis — A New Book Tells His Story To Kids

Corrected on January 27, 2021

An earlier version of this story mistakenly said Nicholas Winton died in 2016. In fact, he died in 2015. Also, a previous summary of this story that appeared on the homepage mistakenly said the children escaped Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia in 1938. In fact, the year was 1939.

Morning Edition

Pompeo Accused China Of Genocide. Experts Say That Term Is Complicated

Corrected on January 24, 2021

In this story, we incorrectly say that President Biden's national security adviser agrees that the Chinese government is committing genocide and crimes against humanity against ethnic Uighurs and other Muslims. While Biden's nominee for secretary of state agrees with this assessment, his national security adviser hasn't publicly weighed in on the issue.

The Uncounted Workforce

Corrected on January 23, 2021

In an earlier version of this episode and in the Web introduction, we said several companies had relied on the labor of incarcerated people in past decades. One of those companies, AT&T, disputed the claim. We relied on sourcing from decades ago, but after review, could not independently and directly confirm those sources today. We have removed the language related to that.

Photos: The Internet's Favorite Inauguration Day Fashions

Corrected on January 22, 2021

In a previous version of this story, Ella Emhoff's stylist was incorrectly identified as Joseph Charles Viola. In fact, Jill Lincoln and Jordan Johnson styled Emhoff for the event. Viola is Emhoff's agent.

DOJ Drops Insider Trading Investigation Into Sen. Richard Burr

Corrected on January 20, 2021

An earlier version of this story said that Sen. Burr privately warned a group of well-connected constituents about the threat from coronavirus and then sold his shares in travel companies. In fact, he sold the shares two weeks prior to issuing that warning.

U.S. Space Command Headquarters May Land In Alabama

Corrected on January 14, 2021

An earlier version of this story said Space Command is a department of the Air Force. It is a combatant command of the Department of Defense that conducts operations in, from and to outer space.

Ask Me Another

Real Or Fake Holiday Album

Corrected on January 14, 2021

In this episode, we incorrectly say that Curious George: A Very Curious Christmas is a real title. In fact, the real title is Curious George: A Very Monkey Christmas.

Morning Edition

Sheldon Adelson, Conservative Donor And Casino Titan, Dies At 87

Corrected on January 12, 2021

An earlier version of this story said that Birthright Israel sends American Jewish youth to Israel on free guided trips. The organization sends Jewish youth from around the world on the trips.

Police Confirm Death Of Officer Injured During Attack On Capitol

Corrected on January 8, 2021

A version of this story published at 8 p.m. ET prematurely reported that U.S. Capitol Police Officer Brian D. Sicknick had died, based on information from a source. Later, U.S. Capitol Police announced that Sicknick had died at 9:30 p.m.

Trump Condemns Capitol Hill Violence, Ignores His Role In Inciting The Mob

Corrected on January 7, 2021

Updated Saturday at noon

An earlier version of this story incorrectly said the video came two weeks after the election rather than two months. In addition, a version of this story published at about 8 p.m. ET prematurely reported that five people, including a Capitol Police officer, died, based on information from a source. The death toll was four at that time. Later, U.S. Capitol Police announced that Officer Brian D. Sicknick had died at 9:30 p.m.

Timeline: How One Of The Darkest Days In American History Unfolded

Corrected on January 7, 2021

A previous version of this story attributed one of President Trump's quotes to the wrong medium. He did not say, "These are the things and events that happen ... Remember this day forever " in the video he released. He made that statement in a subsequent tweet that has now been removed.

It All Comes Down To This — 2 Georgia Races That Will Determine Control Of The Senate

Corrected on January 5, 2021

A previous version of this story incorrectly said that in both Senate races, all candidates from all parties were on one ballot in November. That was only true of the special election, which ended in a runoff between Sen. Kelly Loeffler and Raphael Warnock. The Perdue-Ossoff contest went through a traditional primary process.

Weekend Edition Sunday

2020 Was A Record-Breaking Year For Gun-Related Deaths In The U.S.

Corrected on January 4, 2021

In this report, we incorrectly say Sonali Rajan is an associate professor in the Department of Health and Behavioral Studies at Columbia University. In fact, she is an associate professor of health education at Teachers College, Columbia University.

Morning Edition

In Memoriam 2020: The Musicians We Lost

Corrected on January 2, 2021

A previous version of this story incorrectly listed Sean Malone's birth date as Jan, 1, 1970. He was born April 12, 1970.

A previous version of this story incorrectly described producer Hal Willner. He was a live event record producer, curator of tributes and musical matchmaker — not a Nashville-based singer-songwriter.

Party Like It's 1925 On Public Domain Day (Gatsby And Dalloway Are In)

Corrected on January 1, 2021

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that Congress pushed the date of copyright expiration from 75 years to 97 years in 2001. In fact, the Copyright Term Extension Act was passed in 1998 and extended copyright for certain works, including those from 1925, to 95 years.