Dinowalrus: 'Phone Home From The Edge' If you like wistful tales of growing old, synchronized dancing, and the magical surrealism that could only come from a band named Dinowalrus, check out the group's latest video.

Music

Dinowalrus: 'Phone Home From The Edge'

If you like wistful tales of growing old, synchronized dancing, and the magical surrealism that could only come from a band named Dinowalrus, check out the group's latest video for the song "Phone Home From The Edge."

Dinowalrus is a Brooklyn-based trio whose previous debut record, % (yes, it's called a percent sign), was a sometimes challenging, angular set of arty synth-rock songs. The band's latest album, Best Behavior, is a slightly more restrained production, but no less surprising in its mix of dance beats and dreamy, psychedelic soundscapes.

For this video and song from Best Behavior, director Charlotte Kaufmann says they wanted to tell a story based loosely on Rip Van Winkle.

"A young man awakes from an extended slumber to find that years have passed and his hair has whitened. As he passes through his home, he is haunted by the mysterious specters of his past life. Perhaps the video is also, simply, an approximation of a mid-life crisis experienced on acid (something about which, as a 24 year-old I'm well versed). Either way it was inspired by the layered and psychedelic sound of Dinowalrus' 'Phone Home,' which somehow evokes the effect of memories rushing back."

Dinowalrus frontman Peter Feigenbaum says the song was pivotal for the band, but initially had a more elusive story.

"We wrote it a long time ago, but it was the first song to really represent the direction we wanted to take the songs for our second album: A combination of slow-groovey dance-breakbeats, spacey sampler textures, melodic dubby basslines and iconic, hi-register guitar themes. It also uses a strange alternate drone tuning on the guitar.

"Whether the song is about ET, U2, or the waterfront condo-ization of Williamsburg is still up in the air. Lyrically it doesn't have much of a narrative arc, so I'm glad Charlotte invented one in which I fall into a Rip Van Winkle style slumber and wake up to find that I've turned into [actor] Lloyd Kaufman. There's a line about 'the roof you designed, will never hold up in the weather,' so I'm glad we incorporated the good ol' rooftop finale into the script."

Best Behavior is out March 6 on Old Flame records.

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