Wynton Marsalis On JazzSet Marsalis rings in New Year's 2012, New Orleans style, with the music of King Oliver and Jelly Roll Morton. The trumpeter leads the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra through a rousing set.

The clock strikes midnight with Wynton Marsalis and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra. Frank Stewart for Jazz at Lincoln Center hide caption

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Frank Stewart for Jazz at Lincoln Center

The clock strikes midnight with Wynton Marsalis and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra.

Frank Stewart for Jazz at Lincoln Center

JazzSet with Dee Dee Bridgewater

Wynton Marsalis On JazzSetWBGO

Wynton Marsalis On JazzSet

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The energy in the room is palpable, as Wynton Marsalis launches into "Dipper Mouth Blues," a tune named for King Oliver's trumpet player, Louis Armstrong. "New Orleans Bump" features the whimsical clarinet of Victor Goines. Drummer Ali Jackson takes the spotlight in Jelly Roll Morton's "Froggie Moore." Alto saxophonist Wes Anderson shines in "The Pearls." Trombonist Chris Crenshaw gives the plunger mute a workout in "Smokehouse Blues." "Tom Cat Blues" features a blistering trumpet solo by Marsalis, leading up to a midnight countdown to 2012 with WBGO's Rhonda Hamilton, who was hosting the live coast-to-coast broadcast for NPR's Toast of the Nation.

Marsalis, also the artistic director for Jazz at Lincoln Center, has said that Dizzy's Club Coca-Cola was designed in the spirit of its namesake, Dizzy Gillespie — a welcoming place where people could come and have a good time and the musicians would feel comfortable playing. That's surely the case on this memorable night. By the time Marsalis and his band kicked into their foot-stomping version of the traditional "Auld Lang Syne," the joint was jumping and the stage overrun with friends and family.

On Dec. 31, 2012, Wynton Marsalis will do it again on Toast of the Nation from NPR, playing the music of another New Orleans legend: Louis Armstrong.

Set List

  • "Dipper Mouth Blues" (King Oliver)
  • "New Orleans Bump" (Jelly Roll Morton)
  • "Dead Man Blues" (Morton)
  • "Froggie Moore" (Morton)
  • "The Pearls" (Morton)
  • "Snake Rag" (Oliver)
  • "Smokehouse Blues" (Morton)
  • "Tom Cat Blues" (Morton)
  • "Auld Lang Syne" (Trad.)

Personnel

  • Wynton Marsalis, leader, trumpet
  • Marcus Printup, trumpet
  • Wes Anderson, Walter Blanding, Victor Goines, reeds
  • Chris Crenshaw, trombone
  • Dan Nimmer, piano
  • Carlos Henriquez, bass
  • James Chirillo, guitar, banjo
  • Ali Jackson, drums
  • Ricky Gordon, percussion

Credits

Scriptwriter and producer: Mark Schramm; Recording engineer and Surround Sound mixer: Duke Markos with Rob McComber and David Robinson; Live Toast of the Nation segment producer: Simon Rentner.

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