Blue Note At 75, The Concert The iconic jazz label celebrates a major anniversary with this special performance featuring artists from its past and present: Wayne Shorter, McCoy Tyner, Norah Jones, Jason Moran and many more.

Dr. Lonnie Smith at the Blue Note 75 concert. NPR hide caption

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Dr. Lonnie Smith at the Blue Note 75 concert.

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Blue Note At 75

Blue Note At 75, The Concert

Blue Note At 75, The Concert

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The iconic jazz label Blue Note Records turns 75 this year, and it celebrated in Washington, D.C. As the capstone to a week of performances, film screenings and discussions, Blue Note artists gathered in the 2,465-seat Concert Hall of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts for a special performance. The bill featured giants from Blue Note history — including Wayne Shorter, Bobby Hutcherson, Lou Donaldson and McCoy Tyner — as well as mainstays of the label's present: musicians like Norah Jones, Dianne Reeves, Joe Lovano and Jason Moran. They were joined by special unannounced guests throughout the evening, as well.

NPR Music presented a live webcast of Blue Note At 75, The Concert.

Set List

  • Robert Glasper & Jason Moran, "Boogie Woogie Stomp" (Glasper, piano; Moran, piano)
  • Lou Donaldson feat. Dr. Lonnie Smith, "Blues Walk" (Donaldson, alto saxophone; Smith, organ; Lionel Loueke, guitar; Kendrick Scott, drums)
  • Lou Donaldson feat. Dr. Lonnie Smith, "Whiskey Drinkin' Woman" (same personnel)
  • Lou Donaldson feat. Dr. Lonnie Smith, "Alligator Boogaloo" (same personnel)
  • Joe Lovano, "Fort Worth/I'm All For You" (Lovano, tenor saxophone; Lionel Loueke, guitar; Fabian Almazan, piano; Derrick Hodge, bass; Kendrick Scott, drums)
  • Bobby Hutcherson & McCoy Tyner, "Walk Spirit Talk Spirit" (Hutcherson, vibraphone; Tyner, piano)
  • Bobby Hutcherson & McCoy Tyner, "Blues On The Corner" (same personnel)
  • Bobby Hutcherson & McCoy Tyner, "Fly With The Wind" (same personnel)
  • Dianne Reeves, "Dreams" (Reeves, voice; Terence Blanchard, trumpet; Robert Glasper, piano; Derrick Hodge, bass; Kendrick Scott, drums)
  • Dianne Reeves, "Stormy Weather" (Reeves, voice; Terence Blanchard, trumpet; Peter Martin, piano; Derrick Hodge, bass; Kendrick Scott, drums)
  • Terence Blanchard, "Wandering Wonder" (Blanchard, trumpet; Lionel Loueke, guitar; Fabian Almazan, piano; Derrick Hodge, bass; Kendrick Scott, drums)
  • Norah Jones, "The Nearness Of You" (Jones, voice/piano)
  • Norah Jones, "I've Got To See You Again" (Jones, voice; Wayne Shorter, saxophone; Jason Moran, piano; John Patitucci, bass; Brian Blade, drums)
  • Wayne Shorter, Medley (Shorter, saxophone; Danilo Perez, piano; John Patitucci, bass; Brian Blade, drums)
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