Todd Snider On Mountain Stage During his 14th appearance on Mountain Stage, the Nashville songwriter delivers a career-spanning set of favorites.
Bill Blauser/Mountain Stage
Todd Snider on Mountain Stage
Bill Blauser/Mountain Stage

Mountain Stage

Todd Snider On Mountain Stage

Todd Snider On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/576814876/576841728" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

When Todd Snider makes this appearance on Mountain Stage, his 14th since 1995, the East Nashville-based songwriter has just released his latest album Eastside Bulldog.

"I haven't played anything off my new album," Snider quips towards the end of the set. "It's terrible. I should be ashamed but I'm not."

Instead, Snider delivers a set of career-spanning favorites, including some of his most keenly entertaining yet insightful lyrics ("Statistician Blues") and his heartfelt ode to a friend who always had one request ("Play A Train Song").

"In my free time I like to jam," Snider professes, launching into his highly entertaining explanation of how he came to be the lead singer in Hard Working Americans, the band he founded with bassist David Schools and drummer Duane Trucks of Widespread Panic, guitarist Neal Casal of Chris Robinson Brotherhood and keyboardist Chad Staehly of Great American Taxi. "We're a superhero group," Snider says. "We jam out and we solve crimes."

And while he overlooks Eastside Bulldog, Snider opens with an acoustic rendition of "Roman Candles" from Hard Working Americans' 2016 album Rest In Chaos. (The band released its fourth effort, We're All In This Together, in August 2017.) He invites fellow East Nashvillian Rorey Carroll to the stage for his closing number "Enjoy Yourself" — Snider says he remembers his parents dancing to the Guy Lombardo version of the song.

Snider's memoir, I Never Met A Story I Didn't Like: Mostly True Tall Tales, was published in 2014.

SET LIST

  • "Roman Candles"
  • "Better Than Ever Blues"
  • "Conservative Christian, Right-Wing Republican, Straight, White, American Males"
  • "Stuck On The Corner (Prelude To A Heart Attack)"
  • "Statistician's Blues"
  • "Play A Train Song"
  • "Enjoy Yourself"
[+] read more[-] less

More From Folk

M. Ward performs on Mountain Stage. Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

M. Ward On Mountain Stage

The low-fi indie rock veteran sets the Mountain Stage ablaze.

M. Ward On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/615551105/615559911" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Tamara Lindeman Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

The Weather Station On Mountain Stage

Tamara Lindeman, a songwriter and singer from Toronto, Canada, is known for pairing her narrative songwriting skills with topical matters and subtle reflections of everyday life.

The Weather Station On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/610447326/610448641" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

James McMurtry On Mountain Stage

Revered songwriter James McMurtry marks his 12th performance on Mountain Stage with his signature brand of astute, observational storytelling.

James McMurtry On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/608247257/608264312" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Brian Blauser/Mountain Desk

Tyminski On Mountain Stage

Listen to the 14-time Grammy-winning vocalist, instrumentalist and songwriter return to the Mountain Stage with his newest solo project.

Tyminski On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/593973679/593988834" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Blind Pilot on Mountain Stage Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Blind Pilot On Mountain Stage

In the five years between Blind Pilot's sophomore album and its 2016 follow-up, Israel Nebeker's 13-year relationship ended and his father died. And Then Like Lions is the stunning result of loss.

Blind Pilot On Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/587885583/587899200" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Deer Tick perform at Woods Stage during Pickathon 2017 Matt Tackett/Courtesy of Pickathon hide caption

toggle caption Matt Tackett/Courtesy of Pickathon

Watch Deer Tick Perform 'Card House' Live At Pickathon

opbmusic.org

Watch this band that ping pongs between hard rock and soft folk take a turn towards the latter for a standout performance of their song 'Card House.'

Back To Top