In Serena Williams, A Generation Of Black Players Saw A Legend "Who Looked Like Me" : Consider This from NPR Serena Williams dominated tennis for the better part of two decades. Her athleticism and aggressive style changed the way the women's game is played. And she inspired a generation of young Black players who followed in her footsteps.

Coco Gauff was one of them. At 18 years old, she was born five years after Williams' first Grand Slam singles title. Today, she's ranked 12th in the WTA rankings.

"Growing up, I never thought I was different," she said, "because the number one player in the world was somebody who looked like me."

As Williams plays in what may be the final matches of her career, in the U.S. Open, Chanda Rubin of Tennis Channel reflects on Williams' career and her legacy.

This episode also features reporting on the Williams family's time in Compton, California, from NPR's Danny Hajek.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

In Serena Williams, A Generation Of Black Players Saw A Legend "Who Looked Like Me"

In Serena Williams, A Generation Of Black Players Saw A Legend "Who Looked Like Me"

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Serena Williams acknowledges fans during the first round of the US Open. Julian Finney/Getty Images hide caption

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Julian Finney/Getty Images

Serena Williams acknowledges fans during the first round of the US Open.

Julian Finney/Getty Images

Serena Williams dominated tennis for the better part of two decades. Her athleticism and aggressive style changed the way the women's game is played. And she inspired a generation of young Black players who followed in her footsteps.

Coco Gauff was one of them. At 18 years old, she was born five years after Williams' first Grand Slam singles title. Today, she's ranked 12th in the WTA rankings.

"Growing up, I never thought I was different," she said, "because the number one player in the world was somebody who looked like me."

As Williams plays in what may be the final matches of her career, in the U.S. Open, Chanda Rubin of Tennis Channel reflects on Williams' career and her legacy.

This episode also features reporting on the Williams family's time in Compton, California, from NPR's Danny Hajek.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Connor Donevan and Elena Burnett. It was edited by Bridget Kelley. Our executive producer is Sami Yenigun.