Buffalo shooting: The suspect bought his rifle in 2022, months after police ordered a psychiatric evaluation

Published May 15, 2022 at 7:19 AM EDT
People pray yesterday outside the scene of Saturday's shooting at a supermarket, in Buffalo, N.Y.
Matt Rourke
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AP
People pray yesterday outside the scene of Saturday's shooting at a supermarket, in Buffalo, N.Y.

The weapon used in Saturday’s shooting was purchased this year from a vintage gun store near the suspect’s hometown, the owner of the gun shop confirmed to NPR. He said a background check didn't turn anything up.

Here's more of what we know so far:

Follow the latest developments.

Victims

Relatives honor Ruth Whitfield, 86, as a devoted mom, wife and grandmother

Posted May 16, 2022 at 1:52 PM EDT
Ben Crump stands with several other people at a podium in front of a yellow cross on the wall.
Matt Rourke
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AP
Attorney Benjamin Crump, accompanied by the family of Ruth Whitfield, speaks with members of the media during a news conference in Buffalo, N.Y., on Monday.

Relatives of Buffalo shooting victim Ruth Whitfield paid tribute to their family matriarch and called for policy changes in her memory at an emotional press conference on Monday.

Whitfield's children and grandchildren shared treasured memories and calls to action at the event with their legal team, which is led by prominent civil rights attorney Ben Crump.

Crump described her as "a great lady, a hero for this community [and] an angel for her family," including her four children and husband of 68 years, who has lived in a nearby nursing home for nearly a decade.

Whitfield visited the nursing home every day to care for her husband, and had stopped at the Tops grocery store on her way home from there on Saturday.

"When she didn't feel like it she did it, and she didn't feel like it on this past day either, but she did it anyway," her son Garnell Whitfield, Jr. said, referring to her daily visits. "She left there to get groceries on the way home, and she encountered this evil, hateful — she didn't deserve that ... Nobody deserves that."

Crump and his associates described Saturday's attack as an act of domestic terrorism by a white supremacist, referring to the racist writings reportedly written by the alleged gunman. They said it is not enough just to hold the suspect accountable, adding that there is a need to address the root of the problem by holding responsible the people who "curate" hate in environments like the internet and cable television.

Crump, who is known for representing many families of Black Americans killed by the police, said the tragedy creates an opportunity for positive change, which he said Whitfields' spirit commands.

He specifically urged federal lawmakers to renew stalled efforts to pass an anti-Black hate crime bill, similar to the Anti-Asian hate crime legislation that President Biden signed into law last May.

"[Whitfield's] family will define her legacy, her family will remember her for the love that she instilled in them, in this community and in this world," Crump said at one point. "Her legacy will be a legacy for love, not hate."

Whitfield took care of her husband, who still hasn't learned the news

Whitfield, Jr., a former Buffalo fire commissioner, described his mother as the glue who held his family together. She loved her family unconditionally and sacrified everything for them "even when she had nothing else to give," he said.

He added that his father still doesn't know about her killing.

"How do we tell him the love of his life — his primary caretaker, the person who kept him alive for the last eight years — how do we tell him that she's gone?" he said. "Not just that she's gone, but that she's gone at the hands of a white supremacist, of a terrorist, of an evil person who's allowed to live among us and keep perpetuating this mess. How do we tell him that?"

In a Monday appearance on CBS Mornings, Whitfield said his family is still working through questions like whether he should attend the memorial service and how to care for him in the way his mother would have wanted.

He also mentioned that he tried to reach his mom upon hearing about the shooting on Saturday, knowing that the nursing home is blocks away from the supermarket. He learned that she was among the victims when he went down to the store to help and saw her car in the parking lot.

Whitfield loved camping, cooking and time with her family

Whitfield's family members took turns sharing tributes and pleas at the press conference, with many saying that they hadn't planned to speak but felt compelled to honor her memory and push for change.

Whitfield Jr. said it was not an easy decision to go public.

"We're a private family," he explained. "But how else could we honor our mother, how else could we uphold the things she put in us, the things she beleived in? How else could we do that?"

One of Whitfield's daughters, Angela, described her mother as "an 86-year-old powerhouse," adding, "She was beautiful, she was immaculate, and she loved us.

Her youngest son, Raymond, called her "unapologetically an African American princess" who taught her children to be proud of their identity.

Another daughter, Robin, said Whitfield was not just her mom but her best friend, and reflected on the time they spent time fishing and camping together. She ended her tribute by asking the shooter: "How dare you?"

One of Whitfield's granddaughters, Kamila, spoke, describing her grandmother as "devoted" and sharing some of her other qualities.

Whitfield loved cooking big meals and hosting her family for Sunday dinner, she said, mentioning macaroni and cheese and poundcakes as standout dishes. She also made sure to always look her best and loved shopping, not hesitating to bring home an accessory or item of clothing that she thought would suit her family members.

She was also someone people could talk to without fear of judgement, she added, a good listener who "would choose her words wisely before she responded and speak love into any situation you had going on."

Kamilah added that her grandmother — who was also her downstairs neighbor — was building a "beautiful relationship" with her 17-month-old baby, who would knock on her door for a hug or kiss every time they came and went.

"I just try to walk so fast in and out the house now, so that she doesn't try to stop," she said tearfully.

Her family members don't want others to be in their position

Crump and Whitfield's relatives framed her killing as part of a much bigger pattern, and urged their audience to treat it as more than just a headline.

"This is not just some story to drive the news cycle," Whitfield Jr. said at the press conference. "This is our mother, this is our lives ... Help us change this, this can't keep happening."

Raymond, spoke of the guilt of not being able to protect his mother on Saturday. He said he felt an extra weight on his shoulders because him and his parents had moved back to Buffalo from California, where they had gone for his job.

He remarked that his mom would watch the news religiously, "fretting for the world."

"Many times I sat with her watching, and too many times we watched this man fight these same battles with other families standing behind him trying to fight back tears," he added, referring to Crump.

In the past, when the press briefings ended, they would wipe away their tears and go on with their day, he said. But this time, there's "no walking on with life."

"So I say to you, what are you willing to do so that the next time it's not you standing here before your broken-hearted family?" he asked those listening. "What are you willing to do?"

Firearms

The suspect purchased his rifle in 2022, months after police ordered a psychiatric evaluation

Posted May 16, 2022 at 12:13 PM EDT

The weapon used in Saturday’s shooting in Buffalo was purchased this year from a vintage gun store near the suspect’s hometown, the owner of the gun shop confirmed to NPR.

Robert Donald, 75, the owner of Vintage Firearms in Endicott, N.Y., told NPR that the firearm was purchased in 2022. And he confirmed that he had run a background check on Payton Gendron, the 18-year-old suspect, but that the report showed nothing.

The purchase took place months after New York state police briefly took Gendron into custody after he made a threat about a shooting, as authorities have described.

Last June, state police investigated Gendron and ordered a psychiatric evaluation. After a day and a half in a hospital, he was released, authorities say. Afterward, he did not remain on law enforcement’s radar.

The timing of the gun purchase, along with Donald’s report of a clean background check, raises questions about why a police-ordered mental health evaluation would not have appeared on the report.

Donald’s store typically sells vintage and collectible firearms. In an interview with The New York Times, he said his store only sells about half a dozen assault rifles each year – and that Gendron did not stand out.

In the suspect's 180-page screed posted online, the suspect described the gun as a Bushmaster XM-15, an AR-15-style rifle.

Police said Sunday that they recovered two additional guns from his car, a second rifle and a shotgun, but did not release further details.

From WSKG

Residents of Conklin, N.Y., are shocked the Buffalo suspect is from the area

Posted May 16, 2022 at 11:44 AM EDT
Law enforcement surround the alleged shooter's family home in Conklin, N.Y., on Saturday night.
Phoebe Taylor-Vuolo/WSKG News
Law enforcement surround the alleged shooter's family home in Conklin, N.Y., on Saturday night.

As Phoebe Taylor-Vuolo reports for member station WSKG:

The alleged gunman who killed 10 people in a racist attack at a Buffalo grocery store on Saturday is from Conklin, N.Y., a small, mostly white town just outside of Binghamton. Conklin residents are trying to make sense of the shooting.

Jimays Flea Market is minutes from the suspect’s family home, which was surrounded by law enforcement Saturday night.

Tammy Clapper is one of the owners and has worked at Jimays for over 30 years. She said she recognized the suspect because he used to shop at the flea market.

“Just shocked, completely shocked,” she said on Sunday of her reaction.

Some vendors and workers, she said, knew the alleged shooter.

Head to WSKG.org for more.

Reactions

Video: Buffalo residents mourn the victims of a racist mass shooting

Posted May 16, 2022 at 11:15 AM EDT

Shocked residents of Buffalo, N.Y., gathered yesterday at a vigil to mourn the 10 people fatally shot, allegedly by a white supremacist in an act one official described as "domestic terrorism, pure and simple."

The shooter was wearing body armor, carried an AR-15-style rifle and livestreamed the attack, police said, adding that of the 10 people dead and three wounded, 11 are Black.

The shooting is being investigated as a hate crime and "racially motivated violent extremism," Stephen Belongia, special agent in charge of the FBI's Buffalo field office, told reporters.

Politics

Liz Cheney says GOP leadership has enabled white nationalism

Posted May 16, 2022 at 10:42 AM EDT
Rep. Liz Cheney, in a gray suit and pearl necklaces, speaks into a microphone while sitting in front of flags.
Drew Angerer
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Getty Images
Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) speaks during a Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol business meeting on Capitol Hill March 28, 2022 in Washington, DC.

In the wake of the Buffalo supermarket shooting, Republican Rep. Liz Cheney is accusing her party's leaders of enabling white nationalism, white supremacy and antisemitism.

"History has taught us that what begins with words ends in far worse," she tweeted this morning.

Cheney went a step further, calling on Republican leaders to "renounce and reject these views and those who hold them."

The FBI is investigating Saturday's attack as a racially motivated hate crime, and federal authorities are also considering a potential terrorism charge.

The suspected shooter, who is white, is believed to have written a 180-page screed detailing his white supremacist ideologies and his plan to attack a Black community.

He is allegedly a proponent of "replacement theory," a conspiracy theory that claims non-white individuals are being brought into the U.S. and other Western countries to "replace" white voters to achieve a political agenda.

The idea is popular among white supremacist and anti-immigration groups, and appears to be gaining traction among the broader public, according to a recent poll. One in three U.S. adults believes an effort is underway to replace U.S.-born Americans with immigrants for electoral purposes, the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research found in a poll conducted in December.

Several Republican lawmakers came under scrutiny over the weekend for their perceived embrace of elements of the theory. Among them was New York Rep. Elise Stefanik, who last May replaced Cheney — ousted from party leadership over her criticism of former President Donald Trump following the Jan. 6 riot — as the No. 3 House Republican.

Stefanik's campaign committee ran a series of ads in Sept. 2021 accusing Democrats of allowing undocumented immigrants into the U.S. as a play to outnumber Republican voters, as The Washington Postreported.

Her office released a statement on Monday morning decrying what it called "the Disgraceful, Dishonest and Dangerous Media Smears."

Her senior adviser, Alex DeGrasse, said Stefanik "has never advocated for any racist position or made a racist statement," adding that she opposes mass amnesty for undocumented immigrants and advocates for stronger border control.

"Any implication or attempt to blame the heinous shooting in Buffalo on the Congresswoman is a new disgusting low for the Left, their Never Trump allies, and the sycophant stenographers in the media," he wrote. "The shooting was an act of evil and the criminal should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law."

Illinois Rep. Adam Kinzinger, who like Cheney has broken with his party publicly, tweeted about Stefanik's ads on Saturday night, and wrote that Cheney "got removed for demanding truth."

He added that House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy "should be asked about this."

Analysis

The suspect could potentially be prosecuted under a new federal antilynching act

Posted May 16, 2022 at 10:41 AM EDT
FBI agents stand outside the entrance to the Tops grocery store.
Scott Olson
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Getty Images
Police and FBI agents continue their investigation of the shooting at Tops market yesterday in Buffalo, N.Y.

President Biden signed legislation that designated lynching a federal hate crime back in March. For decades, similar bills had failed to get through Congress.

Under the Emmett Till Antilynching Act, perpetrators can receive up to 30 years in prison when a conspiracy to commit a hate crime results in death or serious bodily injury.

Will the alleged Buffalo gunman be prosecuted under that new law? Potentially, says Adolphus Belk, Jr., a professor of political science and African American studies at Winthrop University in South Carolina.

In an interview with Morning Edition's A Martínez, Belk noted that while it's too early in the process to make this kind of assessment, federal prosecutors certainly have options for pursuing the case — which they already have classified as a hate crime.

That could involve existing laws like the 2009 Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act as well as the new antilynching act, Belk said, even though the name might suggest otherwise to some observers.

"Because of the name that's attached to [the Emmett Till act], there's a tendency to look backward and to think about lynching as it was exercised against Black and Brown people and others who were targeted many, many years ago — when there is a clear attempt to deal with lynching as it's manifesting today," Belk said.

That's especially true in cases where people coordinate attempts or attacks with others, he said, adding that it would be important for prosecutors to determine whether the alleged shooter acted alone, who potentially assisted him and how.

Belk said there's a much broader problem to address, with FBI data confirming there's been an increase in hate crimes in the past year.

The suspect in Buffalo allegedly ascribed to white nationalist beliefs like replacement theory. Belk said this kind of resentment is triggered by increased political and economic competition from people of color as well as increased economic hardship or stagnation. In this case, the alleged shooter reported being radicalized online during the COVID-19 pandemic, developing a deep hatred of people of color and religious minorities.

"The danger here," Belk said, "is in not treating the problem for what it is: White nationalism sparking domestic terrorism."

Victims

Roberta Drury, 32, is remembered as a “great help” to her family, her brother says

Posted May 16, 2022 at 10:13 AM EDT
 A photo of Roberta Drury, 32, who was killed in Saturday's shooting at a Tops supermarket in Buffalo.
Christopher Moyer
A photo of Roberta Drury, 32, who was killed in Saturday's shooting at a Tops supermarket in Buffalo.

Christopher Moyer lives with his family just down the street from the Tops supermarket where his adoptive sister, Roberta Drury, 32, was killed in Saturday’s shooting.

Moyer is recovering from leukemia – having had a bone marrow transplant a few years ago – and said Roberta would often shop for groceries for his family.

“She would go to Tops for us all the time, actually,” Moyer told NPR. “We don’t really have family in the area, so it was just a great help that she could do something for us like that.”

It was at that Tops supermarket where Roberta and nine other people were shot and killed Saturday in a shooting motivated by racism.

“It’s very hard on the family,” Moyer said. “This was very unexpected.”

The shooting rocked the small Buffalo neighborhood where it occurred and reverberated across the country. President Biden called the shooting an “racially motivated act of white supremacy.” A “nightmare” is how Buffalo mayor Byron Brown described it.

When Moyer first heard news of the attack, he figured his sister was probably safe. But then he started to hear from some of Roberta’s friends, who told him she’d gone to the store and hadn’t come back.

“We then started to become concerned. And she always has her phone on her, so when we tried to reach her by phone, she didn’t respond,” he said.

Moyer thanked those who’ve reached out to offer support and praised first responders, including the store’s security guard, Aaron Salter, who was also killed in the shooting.

Roberta struggled with personal issues, Moyer said, but noted that he’ll remember how she’d pick up groceries and spend time with his two kids. He said the violence came as a complete shock to the tight-knit, predominantly Black community.

“This is a real blow and a real tragedy to the area,” Moyer said. “I don’t think anyone saw something like this coming.”

Technology

How the alleged shooter livestreamed the attack, and how sites can stop such videos

Posted May 16, 2022 at 9:42 AM EDT

The alleged perpetrator of Saturday's mass shooting at a Buffalo supermarketlivestreamed the racist attack online. Using a GoPro camera attached to a military-style helmet, the shooter streamed live on the site Twitch for around two minutes before the site took the livestream down. Since then, the video has been posted elsewhere on the internet.

Experts say platforms could be doing more to prevent livestreams of atrocities from gaining an audience online.

White supremacists have used social media platforms to publicize attacks in the past

Other white-supremacists have also used social media to publicize gruesome attacks, including the mass shooter in Christchurch, New Zealand in 2019.

Since the Christchurch shooting, social media companies have gotten better in some ways at combating videos of atrocities online, including stopping livestreams of attacks faster.

But violent videos like those of mass shootings are saved by some users and then reappear across the internet on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, TikTok, and other platforms. Those reuploaded videos are harder for companies to take down, says NPR's Bobby Allyn.

On the site Streamable, the video of the Buffalo shooting was viewed more than 3 million times before it was removed, says Allyn.

New York Gov. Kathy Hochul said social media companies bear some responsibility when crimes like the Buffalo shooting happen.

"The social media platforms that profit from their existence need to be responsible for monitoring and having surveillance, knowing that they can be, in a sense, an accomplice to a crime like this, perhaps not legally but morally," Hochul said.

Allyn reports that social media companies usually are not held liable for what they don't police on their sites. Listen to his discussion onMorning Edition.

Experts say social media companies could do more

Social media companies used to take a mostly hands-off approach to moderating content on their sites, but now more than ever sites are trying to manage the societal problems their sites create, reports Allyn. Facebook, Twitter and other sites like them have teams of thousands working to moderate content and block violent media from reaching people.

For example Twitch, the site the Buffalo shooter livestreamed on, could make it harder for people to open accounts and instantly upload live videos. Other video-streaming sites like TikTok and YouTube require users to have a certain number of followers before they're able to stream live, reports Allyn.

Arts

What the cast of a touring Broadway show said onstage in Buffalo after the shooting

Posted May 16, 2022 at 8:46 AM EDT
A Broadway marquis sign for 'Ain't Too Proud.'
Cindy Ord
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Getty Images
The sign for 'Ain't Too Proud - The Life and Times of The Temptations' is shown at the Imperial Theatre near Times Square in New York City in January 2021. The company was oerforming on tour in Buffalo during the grocery store shooting.

The Broadway musical Ain’t Too Proud: The Life and Times of The Temptations is on tour across North America. On Saturday, the cast was performing a matinee at Shea's Performing Arts Center in Buffalo while the mass shooting unfolded less than two miles away. At the end of the show, as news trickled in, cast members stayed onstage to address the tragedy.

Speaking for the entire company, performer James T. Lane said those involved with the production would like to "lift up in love" the victims of the shooting, as well as their loved ones and anyone else impacted. He added that such an event "affects us all in a most personal way and affects our society at large and, ultimately, the world we all live in."

"Each and every person in this world deserves to live free of fear and discrimination because of the color of their skin," he said. "Theater, music and the arts are safe spaces where tolerance is celebrated, community is uplifted, and love is unconditional. We have all shared in that love this evening. That is a very, very powerful thing."

The touring production and Shea's Performing Arts Center also issued a joint statement condemning "the hate-filled actions of an individual," thanking first responders and extending their sympathies to those affected "as well as the entire Black community in Buffalo that was so brutally and viciously targeted."

Several people commented on the venue's Facebook post that they had been moved by Saturday's production and post-show speech, with one writing that "there was not a dry eye in the theater ... many of the actors included."

Victims

Here are the 10 people killed and 3 hurt in the Buffalo shooting

Posted May 16, 2022 at 8:39 AM EDT

The Buffalo Police Department has released its official list of victims in Saturday’s shooting at Tops Friendly Markets. The department said on Sunday that the victims’ identities were confirmed and all families and loved ones have been notified.

The 10 people who were killed:

  • Roberta A. Drury of Buffalo, N.Y. – age 32
  • Margus D. Morrison of Buffalo, N.Y. – age 52
  • Andre Mackneil of Auburn, N.Y. – age 53
  • Aaron Salter of Lockport, N.Y. – age 55
  • Geraldine Talley of Buffalo, N.Y. – age 62
  • Celestine Chaney of Buffalo, N.Y. – age 65
  • Heyward Patterson of Buffalo, N.Y. – age 67
  • Katherine Massey of Buffalo, N.Y. – age 72
  • Pearl Young of Buffalo, N.Y. – age 77
  • Ruth Whitfield of Buffalo, N.Y. – age 86

Three people suffered injuries that have been deemed non-life threatening. Two of them are no longer in the hospital:

  • Zaire Goodman of Buffalo, N.Y. – age 20 (treated and released from ECMC)
  • Jennifer Warrington of Tonawanda, N.Y. – age 50 (treated and released from ECMC)
  • Christopher Braden of Lackawanna, N.Y. – age 55
Reaction

The U.N. secretary-general calls the attack a 'vile act of racist violent extremism'

Posted May 16, 2022 at 8:20 AM EDT
A man with gray hair, wearing a suit, speaks into a microphone during a press conference.
Theresa Wey
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AP
António Guterres, the secretary-general of the United Nations, addresses the media May 11 during a press conference at the Federal Chancellery in Vienna.

United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres called the mass shooting in Buffalo a "vile act of racist violent extremism," according to a statement from Farhan Haq, the U.N. chief's deputy spokesperson.

Officials say they are investigating the shooting as racially motivated hate crime. The suspected shooter, who is white, is believed to have written a 180-page screed that delves into his white supremacist beliefs.

Guterres extended condolences to the families of the 10 people who were killed in the shooting, adding that he "hopes justice will be served swiftly," according to the statement.

"The Secretary-General condemns in the strongest terms racism in all its forms and discrimination based on race, religion, belief or national origin," the statement read. "We must all work together towards building more peaceful and inclusive societies."

Official update

The gunman had plans to continue his rampage, says Buffalo police commissioner

Posted May 16, 2022 at 7:50 AM EDT

The alleged perpetrator of Saturday's mass shooting planned to continue his attack beyond the Tops supermarket had he not been stopped by police, Buffalo Police Commissioner Joseph Gramaglia told ABC News on Monday.

“We have uncovered information that if he escaped the [Tops] supermarket, he had plans to continue his attack," Gramaglia said. "He had plans to continue driving down Jefferson Ave to shoot more black people ... possibly go to another store [or] location."

Eleven of the 13 people who were shot — including all 10 who died — are Black.

The alleged shooter was arraigned on a first-degree murder charge hours after he was taken into custody, according to law enforcement officials.

The FBI is investigating the shooting as a hate crime and "an instance of racially motivated violent extremism," while federal authorities are also looking at potential terrorism charges.

Gun violence

The U.S. has seen more than 200 mass shootings this year, including 3 this weekend

Posted May 16, 2022 at 7:48 AM EDT
Police cars block off a street, with trees and mountains in the background.
Mario Tama
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Getty Images
Police vehicles park near the scene of a shooting at the Geneva Presbyterian Church yesterday in Laguna Woods, Calif.

The tragedy at the Buffalo grocery store on was the deadliest mass shooting of the year in the U.S. But it wasn't the only incident of its kind to take place over the weekend.

Yesterday afternoon, two people were killed and three critically injured in a shooting at a crowded flea market in Houston. Authorities said all five people — who likely knew each other — were involved in a disturbance leading up to the shooting, in which no bystanders were injured.

That same day, a man opened fire at a lunch reception at a church in Laguna Woods, Calif., killing one person and wounding five senior citizens before being stopped and hog-tied by other parishioners. Authorities have said that the suspect is an Asian man in his 60s, and that the majority of those inside the Geneva Presbyterian Church at the time were believed to be of Taiwanese descent. They said they didn't believe the gunman lived in that community, but did not immediately identify a motive for the shooting.

And police in Winston-Salem, N.C., are investigating after seven people were shot at three different crime scenes across the city. Authorities say their injuries are non-life-threatening. They believe that the shootings are connected, rather than random acts of violence, according to broadcaster WSOC-TV.

There have been 201 mass shootings in the U.S. this year, according to a tracker from the Gun Violence Archive. It defines a mass shooting as an incident in which four or more people are shot or killed, excluding the shooter, and keeps a running list here.

As NPR has reported, the U.S. had experienced a similar number of mass shootings around this time last year — also about 10 a week — and ended 2021 with 693 recorded such incidents.

Recap

What we know so far about the Buffalo mass shooting

Posted May 16, 2022 at 7:47 AM EDT
Three people kneel on the grass outside the "Tops" grocery store parking lot.
Matt Rourke
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AP
People pray yesterday outside the scene of a shooting at a supermarket, in Buffalo, N.Y. On Saturday, a white 18-year-old killed 10 people and wounded three in what authorities described as "racially motivated violent extremism."

A white, 18-year-old gunman allegedly carried out a racist attack at a supermarket in Buffalo, N.Y., on Saturday, killing 10 people and injuring three others, according to authorities. Almost all of the victims were Black.

The suspect, who livestreamed the mass shooting, is believed to be the author of a screed posted online detailing his white supremacist ideologies and his plan to target a Black community in New York.

Click here or expand this page for more details.

The shooter faces life in prison

The suspect has been charged with first-degree murder. If convicted, he would face a maximum sentence of life without parole.

Officials have said they are investigating the mass shooting as a racially motivated hate crime and are also considering a terrorism charge. Separately, the FBI is investigating the shooting as both a hate crime and racially motivated violent extremism.

"The evidence we have uncovered so far makes no mistake. This is an absolute racist hate crime that will be prosecuted as a hate crime. This is someone who has hate in their heart, soul and mind," said Buffalo Police Commissioner Joseph Gramaglia.

11 of the 13 victims were Black

Loved ones have been sharing details about those who were killed in the shooting. Some of the victims actively worked to serve their community. Of the 13 total shot, 11 were Black, two were white. Four of the victims were store employees.

Aaron Salter, a former police lieutenant who worked as a security guard at the store, was shot and killed after confronting the shooter at the front entrance.

Ruth Whitfield, 86, was a "beloved wife, mother, and grandmother," her lawyer said.

Pearly Young, who ran a weekly food pantry, was shopping for groceries when she was killed.

Katherine "Kat" Massey was a writer who wrote about gun violence in her community and was part of a community group that helped local residents.

Heyward Patterson would drive residents to get their groceries and volunteered at his church in his free time.

Celestine Chaney was at the grocery store to get shrimp and strawberry shortcake. The 65-year-old delighted in her role as a grandmother most of all.

Roberta Drury, 32, was at the supermarket to get food for dinner. She didn't live in Buffalo but was there to be with her brother.

New York Gov. Kathy Hochul says $2.8 million in federal and state fundingwill go toward helping victims' families cover funeral and burial expenses of up to $6,000, as well as medical expenses and counseling.

This is how police say the attack unfolded

The alleged gunman drove more than 200 miles from his small hometown of Conklin, N.Y., and arrived in east Buffalo the day before the attack to conduct "reconnaissance" on the grocery store, police said.

The shooting at Tops Friendly Markets began at 2:30 p.m. ET in a parking lot outside the store, located in a predominantly Black neighborhood about 3 miles from downtown.

The gunman stepped out of his car wearing tactical gear and opened fire with an assault-style rifle, shooting four people, officials said. Three of those people died. After the gunman worked his way into the store, security guard Aaron Salter attempted to the stop the shooter by firing his gun, but the gunman's body armor shielded him from the bullet. The suspect then shot and killed Salter.

The suspect was eventually confronted by police at the front of the store. He briefly pointed the rifle at his neck before police persuaded him to drop his guns and surrender.

The gunman livestreamed the attack the platform Twitch, the company told NPR. The stream was shut down less than 2 minutes after the violence began, the company said.

The shooter is an apparent white supremacist who left plans for a racist attack

The suspected gunman, Payton S. Gendron, allegedly published a 180-page document to the anonymous message board 4chan before carrying out the attack. The pages repeat a series of white supremacist ideologies, including a racist conspiracy theory known as "replacement theory," in an attempt to justify his plan to target and murder African Americans. The gunman who carried out the massacre of 51 people at two New Zealand mosques in 2019 promoted the same racist theory.

The screed's author, who has the same name as the suspected shooter, says "extreme boredom" during the pandemic led to his radicalization.

The gunman used a Bushmaster AR-15-style rifle in the Buffalo shooting with an attachable high-capacity magazine — a banned device in New York, meaning it was illegally purchased or illegally transported across state lines, said Gov. Hochul. Police also recovered a second rifle and a handgun from his car.

The suspect had threatened a shooting at his high school last year. He was subsequently sent to a hospital for a mental health evaluation that lasted a day and a half.

In Washington

Biden will travel to Buffalo on Tuesday

Posted May 15, 2022 at 8:24 PM EDT

President Biden and first lady Jill Biden will travel to Buffalo on Tuesday, the White House said on Sunday evening, "to grieve with the community that lost ten lives in a senseless and horrific mass shooting."

Earlier on Sunday, Biden said the attack was a "racially motivated act of white supremacy."

Speaking at a memorial for fallen police officers, he added: "We must all work together to address the hate that remains a stain on the soul of America. Hearts are heavy once again, but a resolve must never, ever waver."

The Victims

The names of three more victims emerge

Posted May 15, 2022 at 8:09 PM EDT

The names of three more victims of the racist attack at the Tops Friendly Market emerged on Sunday. A gunman killed 10 people and injured three others in the shooting at the Buffalo, N.Y., grocery store on Saturday. Officials have not yet released the names of all of the victims but family members have spoken to media outlets about the loss of their loved ones.

Heyward Patterson

Heyward Patterson was among those killed. He worked as a driver who gave rides to residents to and from the grocery store and would help with their groceries.

The 68-year-old regularly attended The State Tabernacle Church of God and would stand at the doorway to welcome people into the service on Sundays, The Buffalo News reported.

Patterson was the church pastor's armor-bearer and would volunteer to clean the church every Saturday, according to the paper, and he also spent time in the soup kitchen.

“He would give the shirt off his back,” his wife, Tirzah Patterson, told The Buffalo News. “That’s who he is. He wouldn’t hurt anybody. Whatever he had, he’d give it to you. You ask, he’ll give it. If he don’t got it, he’ll make a way to get it or send you to the person that can give it to you. He’s going to be missed a lot.”

Celestine Chaney

Celestine Chaney was at the grocery store to get shrimp and strawberry shortcake. The 65-year-old was a grandmother to six and had a great-grandchild. She was also a cancer survivor, WKYC reported.

She prized her role as a grandmother most of all, The Buffalo Newsreported, with her grandchildren ranging in age from 4 to 28. She was a regular churchgoer and enjoyed playing bingo and shopping.

"She was probably the sweetest person you could meet," her daughter Dominque Brown told the paper. "Very loving, very giving, very kind."

Roberta Drury

Roberta Drury, 32, was at the supermarket to get food for dinner.

“She was very vibrant,” her sister Amanda Drury told The New York Times. “She always was the center of attention and made the whole room smile and laugh.”

Drury lived in the Syracuse area but was in Buffalo to be with her brother, according to Syracuse.com.

The North Syracuse Central School District said Drury had attended schools there. "The news of the shooting so close to home is devastating enough, but to learn that a member of our NorthStar family fell victim to an extremist act of hate, is unfathomable," the superintendent said in a statement. "Our hearts are broken by news of the despicable act and they go out to the families of friends of Roberta and all the victims."

The Victims

New York's governor says $2.8 million will go toward helping the victims

Posted May 15, 2022 at 6:17 PM EDT

New York Gov. Kathy Hochul says $2.8 million in federal and state funding will go toward helping the victims of a gunman's racist attack at a Buffalo, N.Y., supermarket.

Funds can be used to cover funeral and burial expenses of up to $6,000, medical expenses and counseling. A state agency can also assist with the loss of wages and the loss of support, according to the governor's office.

The governor also noted that the supermarket where the shooting occurred was in a "food desert" and was the only supermarket within walking distance for residents in the area. Hochul says Uber and Lyft will provide free rides worth up to $20 for residents to reach two other grocery stores.

"The past 24 hours have been traumatizing for New Yorkers, and my administration will spare no effort to ensure the victims of this act of terrorism by a white supremacist are receiving all the resources and support they need," she said in a statement.

The Victims

Lawyer Ben Crump says he will represent one of the victims

Posted May 15, 2022 at 5:19 PM EDT
Attorney Ben Crump, pictured on May 11 in Houston, will represent the family of one of the victims of the attack in Buffalo.
Brandon Bell
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Attorney Ben Crump, pictured on May 11 in Houston, will represent the family of one of the victims of the attack in Buffalo.

The high-profile civil rights attorney Ben Crump says he has been retained to represent the family of Ruth Elizabeth Whitfield, one of the victims who was killed in a gunman's racist attack at a supermarket in Buffalo, N.Y., on Saturday.

Crump is best known for representing the families of Black people killed by police.

“These grieving families deserve to know how a white supremacist, so vocal about his hatred, was able to carry out a premeditated and targeted act of terrorism against Black people – all while armed with an assault rifle fitted with a high-capacity magazine," he said in a statement. "It’s an all-too familiar scenario, with the same tragic, but preventable ending. We will get answers for these families, and we will hold those responsible for this tragedy accountable.”

Whitfield, 86, was the mother of a retired Buffalo fire commissioner. Buffalo Mayor Byron Brown told NPR that Whitfield had visited her husband in a nursing home near the store.

She "was picking up a few items and never made it out of the supermarket," he said.

Whitfield was a "beloved wife, mother, and grandmother" and was her husband's primary caretaker, according to Crump.

Crump has taken on more than 200 police violence cases in his career, and brought media attention and millions of dollars in civil settlements for the families of those killed.

Co-counsel Terry Connors of Connors LLP and Ken Abbarno of DiCello Levitt have also been retained by the family, according to a statement from Crump's law firm.

The Victims

Civil rights advocate Katherine 'Kat' Massey was one of those killed

Posted May 15, 2022 at 4:37 PM EDT

Activist and writer Katherine "Kat" Massey, 72, was one of those killed by the gunman in a racist attack in Buffalo, N.Y., on Saturday, according to The Buffalo News and The Associated Press.

Her sister, Barbara Massey, toldThe Buffalo News that Katherine was "a beautiful soul."

Massey was a member of the community group We Are Women Warriors. The group held a forum in February to discuss ways to tackle youth violence after an incident in a local high school. A year earlier, the group organized a giveaway of masks and PPE for people in Buffalo.

Massey had written for both the Buffalo Challenger and The Buffalo Criterion newspapers, which were established to serve the city's Black residents.

According to The Buffalo News, Massey was a frequent writer of letters to the editor in that newspaper as well.

In May 2021, she wrote about what she called "the escalating gun violence in Buffalo and many major U.S. cities."

"There needs to be extensive federal action/legislation to address all aspects of the issue," her letter to The Buffalo News read. "Current pursued remedies mainly inspired by mass killings – namely, universal background checks and banning assault weapons – essentially exclude the sources of our city’s gun problems. Illegal handguns, via out of state gun trafficking, are the primary culprits."

"We lost a voice yesterday. We lost a powerful, powerful voice," Massey's longtime friend Betty Jean Grant told the paper.

Buffalo aftermath

After racist attack, Buffalo pastor says change must follow tragedy

Posted May 15, 2022 at 4:04 PM EDT

The pastor of a local Baptist church is working to help heal a close-knit community that's grappling with the shock and grief of Saturday’s racist attack that killed 10 people at a supermarket in Buffalo, N.Y.

“They’re not doing well at all,” Darius Pridgen, senior pastor of True Bethel Baptist Church, tells NPR's Ayesha Rascoe, after the church held its first Sunday service since the mass shooting. Those in attendance included Gov. Kathy Hochul and, on a video call, Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York.

He says people affiliated with the church know several of the victims and their families. "People are just hurt, and rather confused at times about why the shooter would choose Buffalo, New York, and choose a supermarket," the pastor says. "It is a tragedy like we've never seen."

Though being a pastor is his calling, Pridgen says, fulfilling that leadership role is incredibly difficult right now.

“I'm just a boy from Buffalo who is grieving with my brothers and sisters,” he says. “So, what I do say when I do have to put on the pastor hat is that there are times that there has to be tragedy for there to be change. There's never been a change in the world, in our country without there being some form of hurt."

To Pidgen, the tragedy makes it clear that racism exists and that there are still white supremacists who want to kill Black people.

But, he says, “My job is to heal the community and make sure that this community does not divide along racial lines, because it wasn't white America that walked into that grocery store. It was one American, and may justice be served on that person.”

the investigation

The suspect threatened a shooting at his high school last year

Posted May 15, 2022 at 2:13 PM EDT

Authorities in Buffalo say the alleged gunman of yesterday’s mass shooting at a grocery store had threatened a shooting at his high school last year.

He was then sent for a mental health evaluation that lasted a day and a half.

Police say the suspect made threats to carry out a shooting in June at his high school near the time of graduation. State police then took him into custody and sent him to a hospital for evaluation.

the victims

An official list of the victims is expected to be released later today

Posted May 15, 2022 at 1:59 PM EDT

Authorities in Buffalo are looking to release the names and ages of all 13 victims in the mass shooting at Tops Friendly Market later today, Buffalo Police Commissioner Joseph Gramaglia said on Sunday.

All of the families and loved ones of the people who were killed or hurt have been informed, Gramaglia told reporters at a midday news conference.

The identities of victims of the racist attack have been trickling out, largely through family members speaking to media outlets. The reported names include:

social media

Footage of the shooting is circulating online

Posted May 15, 2022 at 1:39 PM EDT

Graphic video footage of the mass shooting in Buffalo that was livestreamed on Twitch is circulating online and has been shared on other social media platforms.

A link to a 1-minute clip of the livestream posted on Facebook had racked up nearly 3 million views before it was taken offline for violating that platform's community standards. The post had been up for 12 hours. Prior to that, following a report of the post, Facebook had found that the content did not violate its standards.

"We understand that it may still be offensive or distasteful to you, so we want to help you see less of things like it in the future," the company's update read.

It took longer for the video to be taken down on the host website Streamable. The video had been viewed over 3.2 million times before it was removed for violating the company's terms of service.

On Twitter, a similar clip about a minute long had been viewed over 2,300 times before it was taken down for violating the company's rules.

Also, what appears to be a portion of the copy of the alleged shooter's 180-page racist screed has been on Instagram for 19 hours. That platform did not immediately respond to NPR's email requesting comment.

Twitch told NPR the original stream was removed from its site 2 minutes after the violence began.

Editor's note: Meta, the parent company of Facebook and Instagram, pays NPR to license NPR content.

reaction

Biden calls the Buffalo shooting a racially motivated act of white supremacy

Posted May 15, 2022 at 1:19 PM EDT
 President Biden delivers remarks during the National Peace Officers Memorial Service on Sunday in Washington, D.C.
Stefani Reynolds
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AFP via Getty Images
President Biden delivers remarks during the National Peace Officers Memorial Service on Sunday in Washington, D.C.

President Biden says the shooting in Buffalo was a "racially motivated act of white supremacy" and said the Justice Department is investigating the matter as a hate crime.

“A lone gunman, armed with weapons of war and hate-filled soul, shot and killed 10 innocent people in cold blood at a grocery store on Saturday afternoon,” Biden said, speaking Sunday at a national memorial for fallen police officers.

"We must all work together to address the hate that remains a stain on the soul of America," Biden added. "Hearts are heavy once again, but a resolve must never, ever waver."

Biden made healing "the soul of America" the focus of his run for president, which he has said he decided to launch after the racist demonstrations and violence in Charlottesville, Va., in 2017.

reaction

Vice President Harris decries an 'epidemic of hate'

Posted May 15, 2022 at 12:45 PM EDT

The U.S. is experiencing an "epidemic of hate across our country," Vice President Kamala Harris said in response to the mass shooting in Buffalo, which authorities believe was racially motivated.

"Today our hearts are broken and we grieve for the victims of the horrific act of gun violence in Buffalo and for their families and friends," Harris said in a statement released Sunday.

Of the 10 dead and three wounded, 11 were Black, and the supermarket was located in a predominantly Black part of Buffalo. The suspect also allegedly wrote a 180-page diatribe posted online that includes racist conspiracy theories.

"What is clear is that we are seeing an epidemic of hate across our country that has been evidenced by acts of violence and intolerance. We must call it out and condemn it," Harris said.

"Racially-motivated hate crimes or acts of violent extremism are harms against all of us, and we must do everything we can to ensure that our communities are safe from such acts."

the victims

Ruth Whitfield went to the store to get some things. A gunman took her life

Posted May 15, 2022 at 12:02 PM EDT

Another victim killed in Saturday's mass shooting was Ruth Whitfield, the mother of a retired Buffalo fire commissioner, according to The Buffalo News.

Mayor Byron Brown tells NPR that Whitfield had visited her husband in a nursing home near the store.

She "was picking up a few items and never made it out of the supermarket."

reaction

Social media companies should have algorithms to alert authorities, N.Y. governor says

Posted May 15, 2022 at 11:32 AM EDT

After Saturday's deadly and racially motivated shooting at a grocery store in Buffalo, New York's governor called on social media companies to implement algorithms to alert authorities to concerning content posted by users.

"We're watching to make sure the leaders of these social media companies are going to take responsibility and do much much more to do monitoring themselves of content that is placed on their platforms before it is spread," Gov. Kathy Hochul told NPR.

The suspect, an 18-year-old from the small town of Conklin, N.Y., allegedly posted a 180-page racist screed online filled with conspiracy theories and detailed plans for the shooting.

Hochul called for social media companies to implement an automated "trigger system" that could alert authorities when users post "manifesto-type materials" that show a desire or plan to kill others.

"This was all telegraphed. It was written out in a manifesto that was published on social media platforms," she said. "They have the resources to do this. They need to take ownership of this. Otherwise, this virus will continue to spread."

note to our audience

Why NPR isn't calling the suspect's alleged writings a manifesto

Posted May 15, 2022 at 10:50 AM EDT
Police respond to a mass shooting at a grocery store in Buffalo, N.Y., that left 10 people dead and three others injured.
John Normile
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Getty Images
Police respond to a mass shooting at a grocery store in Buffalo, N.Y., that left 10 people dead and three others injured.

Any decision involving how to cover a mass shooting is by definition difficult and to some extent a balancing act. We have a duty to inform listeners and readers what happened. Details are important to paint a full and accurate picture of events. But at the same time, we are dealing with an individual who has committed an horrific criminal act in an attempt to win attention either to themselves or to a “cause” that they are trying to promote. Our job is to report the facts, not to help the shooter carry out those aims.

As anyone following the story now knows, the Buffalo shooter allegedly published a 180-page document online that repeats a series of racist conspiracy theories often referred to as "replacement theory" in an attempt to justify his plan to search out African Americans and murder them. It is very important that audiences know what the shooter’s purported motives were and that "replacement theory" was part of them. That argument has moved from the far right fringes to more mainstream politics in recent years and the shooter’s citing of it is newsworthy.

Webster’s New World Dictionary defines “Manifesto” as, “a public declaration of motives and intentions, as by a political party or by an avant-garde movement” So to refer to the shooter’s document as a “manifesto”, in my opinion, implicitly takes the twisted racist and anti-Semitic rantings that comprise it, far more seriously than they deserve to be taken and gives it a level of credibility that furthers the shooter’s aims.

Unfortunately mass shootings are common enough that we’ve had far too many opportunities to weigh this issue. Back in 2019, my predecessor as editor for Standards and Practices at NPR, Mark Memmott, responding to the shooting in New Zealand by a man who expressed similar motives, asked the newsroom to “move away” from calling the document that shooter left on line as a “manifesto.”

“The word ‘manifesto,’ ” Memmott wrote, “also may elevate such a statement, in the eyes of those who might want to copy this person's actions, to something more than it might really have been.”

That warning holds true today. A “manifesto” can also be seen as a call to action. There are many words, “statement” “screed” and simply “writings” that come to mind to accurately characterize the online document without giving it the implied importance of “manifesto.”

Not using the word “Manifesto” in no way deprives our audience of information, it helps deprive the shooter of the platform he was looking for.

Tony Cavin is NPR's Managing Editor for Standards and Practices.

the victims

A former police lieutenant is among those killed

Posted May 15, 2022 at 10:04 AM EDT

Former Buffalo Police Lt. Aaron Salter is one of the 10 people killed in the mass shooting at the Tops Friendly Market grocery store, Mayor Byron Brown told NPR.

"Salter died a hero trying to stop the shooter and protect others in the community," Brown said.

Salter worked as a security guard at the store. Three other store employees were also killed, according to officials.

The investigation

Prosecutors are considering terrorism charges against the suspect

Posted May 15, 2022 at 9:50 AM EDT
Police officers report to the scene of a mass shooting Saturday at a grocery store in Buffalo, N.Y.
John Normile
/
Getty Images
Police officers report to the scene of a mass shooting Saturday at a grocery store in Buffalo, N.Y.

Prosecutors are considering a terrorism charge for the 18-year-old man accused of killing 10 people and wounding three others at a supermarket in Buffalo, N.Y.

"We have evidence that this potentially was racially motivated. We have evidence that potentially may lead us to a terrorism charge," Erie County District Attorney John Flynn said in a statement posted online.

Of the 13 people shot, 11 were Black, officials say. The Tops Friendly Market grocery store where the shooting took place is in a historically Black part of Buffalo's east side. Local officials say they believe the suspect was targeting Black people.

The suspect has already been charged with first-degree murder. If convicted, he would face a maximum sentence of life without parole.

What we know

Twitch confirms the shooting was livestreamed on its platform

Posted May 15, 2022 at 9:26 AM EDT

The suspect streamed the shooting on Twitch, a spokeswoman for the company told NPR.

Twitch said the stream was taken offline less than two minutes after the violence started, and it has indefinitely suspended the user from the service.

In remarks after the shooting, New York Gov. Kathy Hochul said social media companies bear some responsibility when extremists use their platforms to amplify violence.

Under federal law, online platforms have a legal shield from being held responsible for what users post. Yet there are exceptions, like when content violates federal criminal laws.

the investigation

Mayor of Buffalo says shooter was 'hatefully indoctrinated' and 'seething with hate'

Posted May 15, 2022 at 9:17 AM EDT

The mayor of Buffalo tells NPR the shooter who killed 10 people came to the city with the intent to kill Black people.

The shooter, with "a heart filled with hate," had a "premeditated plan to come to a community that he perceived to be a Black community and kill as many Black people as he possibly could," said Mayor Byron Brown in an interview with NPR.

"He did not live in this community. He came from 3 hours away to kill people. And his focus seems to be to kill Black people in the city of Buffalo," Brown said.

The shooter was "hatefully indoctrinated," he said.

The city has brought grief counselors to meet with families of victims, the mayor said. The Buffalo Police Department is the lead agency on the investigation, working alongside federal, state and county law enforcement.

Reaction

The ADL calls the suspect the latest terrorist to embrace racism and antisemitism

Posted May 15, 2022 at 9:11 AM EDT

The Anti-Defamation League says the suspect in the Buffalo, N.Y., shooting "is the latest in a long line of violent domestic terrorists ... who turned to violence apparently after ingesting white supremacist and antisemitic content online."

The suspect has been arraigned on first-degree murder charges. As of Sunday morning, he does not face terrorism charges.

The ADL also says its Center on Extremism has reviewed an online screed allegedly written by the suspect.

Reaction

Biden says white nationalism goes against American values

Posted May 15, 2022 at 8:40 AM EDT
At least 10 people were killed Saturday in a shooting at a supermarket in Buffalo, N.Y.
John Normile
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Getty Images
At least 10 people were killed Saturday in a shooting at a supermarket in Buffalo, N.Y.

President Biden cautioned that much is still unknown about the suspect's motivation as the investigation into the Buffalo, N.Y., supermarket shooting gets underway.

"But we don’t need anything else to state a clear moral truth: A racially motivated hate crime is abhorrent to the very fabric of this nation," he said in a statement.

"Any act of domestic terrorism, including an act perpetrated in the name of a repugnant white nationalist ideology, is antithetical to everything we stand for in America."

Officials have said they are investigating the mass shooting, which left 10 people dead, as a racially motivated hate crime. The FBI and federal authorities are also investigating.

what we know

A racist screed posted online detailed the plan for the shooting

Posted May 15, 2022 at 8:10 AM EDT

A screed authored by someone using the same name as the shooter detailed a plan for the attack.

Posted to the anonymous message board 4chan, the author says "extreme boredom" during the pandemic led to his radicalization.

The 180-page document is full of racist rants and appears to embrace the "replacement" white supremacist conspiracy theory that claims that an elite cabal of Jews, corporate leaders and politicians are intentionally diluting the white population through permissive immigration and by promoting diversity.

The same conspiracy theory was championed by the gunman who perpetrated the massacre of 51 people in New Zealand mosques in 2019. The document's author calls the New Zealand shooter his biggest source of inspiration.

The author claims to be a student at the State University of New York's Broome Community College. The college told NPR he is not currently enrolled at the school.

what we know

How police say the attack unfolded

Posted May 15, 2022 at 7:48 AM EDT
Buffalo Police and other authorities are investigating Saturday's mass shooting at a Tops Friendly Market in Buffalo, N.Y.
John Normile
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Getty Images
Buffalo Police and other authorities are investigating Saturday's mass shooting at a Tops Friendly Market in Buffalo, N.Y.

The shooting at a supermarket in Buffalo, N.Y., began at 2:30 p.m. ET outside the store, which is located in a predominantly Black neighborhood, about three miles north of downtown.

That's according to police.

The gunman opened fire with an assault-style rifle, shooting four people in the parking lot, law enforcement officials said. Three of those people died. After the gunman worked his way into the store, the security guard — a retired police officer — confronted the shooter. The suspect then shot and killed the security guard.

The suspect was later confronted by police at the front of the store. He briefly held a gun to his neck, but police said they talked him into dropping his guns and surrendering. He has since been arraigned on first-degree murder charges.

In total, 13 people were shot, 10 of whom were killed.