Colorado Springs shooting: The official injured toll climbs to 25

Published November 20, 2022 at 9:50 AM EST
Joshua Thurman, of Colorado Springs, reacts the morning after a mass shooting at Club Q, an LGBTQ nightclub. Thurman was in the club at the time of the shooting.
Jason Connolly
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AFP via Getty Images
Joshua Thurman, of Colorado Springs, reacts the morning after a mass shooting at Club Q, an LGBTQ nightclub. Thurman was in the club at the time of the shooting.

This page is no longer being updated. For the latest news on the shooting in Colorado Springs, follow Colorado Public Radio's blog or visit NPR.org. You can also listen to NPR on your local member station or on the NPR One app.

At least five people were killed and 25 others were wounded after a gunman opened fire at an LGBTQ club called Club Q in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Police said a 22-year-old suspect is in custody.

Here's what we know so far:

Just In

A patron grabbed a handgun from the shooter, Mayor John Suthers tells NPR

Posted November 20, 2022 at 6:12 PM EST

Speaking with NPR's Michel Martin on All Things Considered this afternoon, Colorado Springs Mayor John Suthers said that the "heroic" intervention of Club Q patrons saved lives.

Suthers said one patron "took the handgun from the [shooter] and hit him with the handgun to disable him."

Suthers also said it was too soon to label the shooting a hate crime.

"There's a lot that's still under investigation," he said.

"We're checking social media, we're checking his communications with other people and things like that. It certainly has the trappings of a hate crime, but it's too early to designate it as such because the motive is a matter of investigation at this time."

The severity of the crime and use of gunfire could also subject the gunman to federal prosecution.

➡️ Listen to the full interview with Suthers on NPR's All Things Considered.

Context

Colorado's hate crime laws, explained

Posted November 20, 2022 at 6:01 PM EST
Bouquets of flowers and a sign reading "Love Over Hate" are left near Club Q, an LGBTQ nightclub in Colorado Springs, Colorado, on November 20, 2022. - At least five people were killed and 18 wounded in a mass shooting at an LGBTQ nightclub in the US city of Colorado Springs, police said on November 20, 2022.
Jason Connolly/AFP via Getty Images
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AFP
Bouquets of flowers and a sign reading "Love Over Hate" are left near Club Q, an LGBTQ nightclub in Colorado Springs, Colorado, on Sunday.

Whether local prosecutors will charge the perpetrator of Saturday's deadly shooting with a hate crime will depend on a number of factors.

In Colorado, a hate crime, also known as a bias-motivated crime, is defined as an assault or vandalism that is at least partially motivated by bias against a person’s actual or perceived race, religion, nationality, age, disability, sexual orientation or gender identity.

"To prove what the person's motivation was, it's not always as easy as it may sound," Michael Dougherty, the district attorney for Boulder County, told NPR.

The suspect’s words can play a major role in determining intent. Dougherty, who has worked on several hate crime cases, said police generally look through what the suspect said online, through text messages, in conversations with friends and family as well as what the suspect said before, during and after the attack.

Location of the attack matters too, Dougherty said. Information around why a suspect chose a specific location, what kinds of people usually populate the area and whether the suspect has visited the location before can all help build a bias-motivated crime case.

For the Colorado shooting, local officials said it is too early in the investigation to determine motivation. When asked whether the attack was a hate crime, local District Attorney Michael Allen said it will be investigated “in that lens.”

ICYMI

Police were on the scene within 3 minutes of the first call

Posted November 20, 2022 at 5:38 PM EST
A police officer monitors the scene near Club Q in Colorado Springs, Colo. early Sunday morning.
Geneva Heffernan
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AP
A police officer monitors the scene near Club Q in Colorado Springs, Colo. early Sunday morning.

One aspect of Saturday evening's shooting that's notable is the speed at which police were able to respond on the scene.

According to the City of Colorado Springs, the timeline looked like this:

— Call for service came in 11:56:57 p.m. MT on Saturday, Nov. 19
— First officer was dispatched at 11:57 p.m. MT
— First officer arrived on the scene midnight MT
— Suspect detained and taken into custody at 12:02 a.m. MT on Sunday, Nov. 20

Police also say that two patrons fought back against the gunman, preventing him from causing further harm. The exact details of that interaction are still unclear.

Here's a look at how long it took police to respond to other shootings this past year:

Buffalo, N.Y. supermarket shooting: Police responded within two minutes of the first call, confronting the gunman as he was exiting the store.

Uvalde, Texas, elementary school shooting: A top Texas law enforcement official in June said police were on the scene within three minutes. But law enforcement waited more than an hour to confront the shooter, which has become the subject of multiple investigations.

University of Virginia school shooting: Campus police responded within a minute of the shots being fired, but the gunman fled the scene, setting off a 12-hour manhunt.

Just In

President Biden issues another statement, this one calling for passage of the Equality Act

Posted November 20, 2022 at 4:51 PM EST
U.S. President Joe Biden, pictured here signing an executive order on advancing equality for LGBTQI+ individuals in June 2022, campaigned on passing legislation such as the Equality Act, which has been stalled in the Senate since February 2021.
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U.S. President Joe Biden, pictured here signing an executive order on advancing equality for LGBTQI+ individuals in June 2022, campaigned on passing legislation such as the Equality Act, which has been stalled in the Senate since February 2021.

Following an earlier statement calling on Congress to pass stricter gun laws, President Biden says his administration is "deeply committed" to "strengthening the rights of LGBTQI+ Americans, including transgender Americans."

"There is no place for violence, hatred, and bigotry in America," the statement reads.

"Yet, tragically, as last night’s attack in Colorado Springs reminds us, too many LGBTQI+ people in the United States—and around the world—continue to face unconscionable attacks.

"This is especially true for transgender Americans. On Transgender Day of Remembrance, we honor the 32 transgender Americans known to have been taken from us this year by horrific acts of brutality. The true toll is likely much higher, with Black and brown transgender women disproportionately targeted."

The White House also called for Congress to pass the Equality Act, which would ban discrimination against people based on sexual orientation and gender identity. The bill passed the House of Representatives in February 2021 but stalled in the Senate, where Republicans say it would infringe upon religious objections.

NPR's Danielle Kurtzleben reports that the bill was a key campaign promise for Biden, who said it would be one of his top legislative priorities for the first 100 days of his presidency.

Newly elected congressional leaders will take office this January following this month's midterm elections. Democrats will keep control of the Senate, but Republicans now hold the balance of power in the House, leaving the fate of the bill unclear.

➡️ Read more about the Equality Act here.

Member Station Reports

Your guide to resources on coping with gun violence and how to help the victims and families

Posted November 20, 2022 at 4:19 PM EST

The impact of these events often goes beyond the visible wounds inflicted by attackers. If you're feeling grief or wondering how you might be able to help the families of victims, CPR News has put together a guide to local resources.

Here are a few more helpful articles from NPR:

  1. What to say to kids when the news is scary
  2. Five things to know about processing grief
  3. A glossary of gender identity terms and ideas

If you are in Colorado and in need of mental health support, call the Colorado Crisis Services hotline at 1-844-493-8255 or text “TALK” to 38255 to speak with a trained counselor or professional. Counselors are also available at walk-in locations or online to chat between 4 p.m. and 12 a.m.

If you are a young person in crisis or in need of a safe and judgment-free place to talk, contact The Trevor Project's Trevor Lifeline 24/7 at 1-866-488-7386, via chat every day or by texting "START" to 678-678.

➡️ Read CPR's local resource guide here.

A crowd of mourners at Club Q continues to grow. Here's a look at the scene

Posted November 20, 2022 at 3:56 PM EST

As morning turned to afternoon in Colorado Springs, mourners continued to gather outside the crime scene boundaries to pay their respect to five victims. Another 25 people are injured, city officials report.

Chaplain and former police officer Michael Travis played taps outside Club Q in Colorado Springs,reports Colorado Public Radio.

Travis said he and his husband almost went to the club last night, but instead decided to turn in early. For the two men, the club is a second home: "We have a lot of friends who work here and perform here," Travis said. "Not knowing who you may have lost is pretty devastating in itself."

Another woman helped her toddler daughter make the sign of a cross after placing a bouquet among the rest. In the background, police could be seen milling around the parking lot, collecting evidence on the scene. A pride flag fluttered in the wind above the building.

Law enforcement officers document evidence in the parking lot.
Jason Connolly
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AFP via Getty Images
Law enforcement officers document evidence in the parking lot.
(L-R) Tyler Johnston, his fiance, Keenan Mastes-Holmes and Altas Pretzeus embrace while paying their respects at a memorial for the victims of the mass shooting at Club Q.
Jason Connolly
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AFP via Getty Images
(L-R) Tyler Johnston, his fiance, Keenan Mastes-Holmes and Altas Pretzeus embrace while paying their respects at a memorial for the victims of the mass shooting at Club Q.
Law enforcement officers walk through the parking lot of Club Q. Colorado Springs police are leading the investigation into Saturday evening's shooting.
Jason Connolly
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AFP via Getty Images
Law enforcement officers walk through the parking lot of Club Q. Colorado Springs police are leading the investigation into Saturday evening's shooting.
Kate Eustice of Willow Creek Wellness sets up a flower stand near Club Q.
Geneva Heffernan
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AP
Kate Eustice of Willow Creek Wellness sets up a flower stand near Club Q.
Dr. Michael R. Travis reflects as he sits next to a memorial for the victims of the mass shooting at Club Q
Jason Connolly
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AFP via Getty Images
Dr. Michael R. Travis reflects as he sits next to a memorial for the victims of the mass shooting at Club Q.

➡️ Read more from Colorado Public Radio here.

Local churches and national religious groups share support for the LGBTQ community

Posted November 20, 2022 at 3:23 PM EST

Local churches are condemning attacks on the LGBTQ community and holding services to honor the lives lost to anti-LGBTQ violence.

Dozens of people packed into the All Souls Unitarian Universalist Church in Colorado Springs Sunday morning for a vigil in memory of those who were killed the night before at the LGBTQ nightclub Club Q.

Colorado Democrat Jared Polis, who is the first openly gay governor, joined the service via Zoom with his husband. He called Club Q a "safe haven for the LGBTQ community in an area where it hasn't always been easy. It's a place where we can gather, dance, and share joy."

"No matter who you love, no matter how you identify, you belong here. We all belong here," Polis said. "And we need to continue to fight for our freedom for everybody to be who they are without fear."

Other houses of worship including Temple Beit Torahand First United Methodist Church in Colorado Springs are hosting vigils today to pray for the victims and survivors of the shooting.

"Prayers today for our Colorado Springs LGBTQIA+ family and a senseless shooting last night at Club Q," the First United Methodist Church wrote on Facebook. "This is not the world God wants. Violence is not how we deal with conflict."

National religious groups like Americans United for Separation of Church and State, an organization advocating for religious freedom, are similarly showing support for the LGBTQ community.

American United wrote in a statement that religious extremists spreading hate toward the LGBTQ community contribute to the violence like the mass shooting in Colorado Springs.

"There can be no freedom for any of us in America until we are all free to live our lives without fear that we will be harmed because of who we are, what we look like or what religion we practice," Americans United wrote.

Colorado went from being the "Hate State" to electing its first openly gay governor in two decades

Posted November 20, 2022 at 2:50 PM EST
D Sonja Semion (L) and Courtney Law, both of Denver, Colorado, become one of the first same-sex couples to be issued a Civil Union license at a midnight ceremony in the Denver Office of the Clerk and Recorder, at the Wellington E. Webb Municipal Office Building on May 1, 2013.
Marc Piscotty/Getty Images
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Getty Images North America
D Sonja Semion (L) and Courtney Law, both of Denver, Colorado, become one of the first same-sex couples to be issued a Civil Union license at a midnight ceremony in the Denver Office of the Clerk and Recorder, at the Wellington E. Webb Municipal Office Building on May 1, 2013.

Colorado Springs councilmember Nancy Henjum says the city has come a long way.

In the early 1990s, the state was known as the “hate state” for its intolerance of the LGBTQ community. At the time, Colorado Springs elected officials sought to make it illegal to prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation. That measure was ultimately struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1996.

A little over two decades later, Colorado voters elected the first openly gay governor in U.S. history, Jared Polis.

“We now — I would say very proudly — are actually a community that is welcoming and supporting and loving of all people,” Henjum told NPR’s Ayesha Rascoe on Weekend Edition.

She added that in the midst of mourning, the Colorado Springs community has also come together to show support for the victims and their families — including several churches in the area.

“We need to continue to move forward in love,” Henjum said.

Just In

The number of those injured in the shooting is now 25, city officials report

Posted November 20, 2022 at 2:26 PM EST
Blood stained clothing is seen on the ground near Club Q, an LGBTQ nightclub in Colorado Springs. Police say at least five people were killed and 25 wounded in a mass shooting on late Saturday evening.
Jason Connolly
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AFP via Getty Images
Blood stained clothing is seen on the ground near Club Q, an LGBTQ nightclub in Colorado Springs. Police say at least five people were killed and 25 wounded in a mass shooting on late Saturday evening.

City officials increased the count of those injured in the shooting from 18 to 25 in their latest press release.

The names of the victims have not been released, as families are still being notified, the city says.

Mayor John Suthers said in a statementthat victims were transported to local hospitals and received emergency medical attention as quickly as possible.

"We will continue to share more information with the community as it becomes available. But please be patient," he wrote. "This is a horrible crime and we have a suspect in custody. We must do this right and ensure justice is served for the victims of this terrible crime."

It's now mid-day in Colorado Springs. Here's where things stand

Posted November 20, 2022 at 2:15 PM EST
Jessy Smith Cruz embraces Jadzia Dax McClendon the morning after a mass shooting at Club Q. At least five people were killed and 18 wounded in the mass shooting.
Jason Connolly
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AFP via Getty Images
Jessy Smith Cruz embraces Jadzia Dax McClendon the morning after a mass shooting at Club Q. At least five people were killed and 18 wounded in the mass shooting.

A small crowd of mourners is starting to grow near Club Q, as people across the nation continue to react to the news.

The AP reports that a makeshift memorial sprung up on Sunday morning near the club, featuring candles in front of a cardboard sign reading "love over hate."

Ryan Johnson, who lives near Club Q and visited the spot last month, described the venue to the AP as "the go-to" for LGBTQ celebrations.

“It just feels crazy, you hear about it and you don’t think it’ll happen and then it happens,” Johnson told the AP. “You come to Colorado and feel safer than other parts of the country and then this happens.”

Here are some things we still don't know:

  1. The gunman's motive — Police say a 22-year-old man is in custody and being treated for injuries.
  2. The names of the victims — At least five are dead and 18 people are injured.
  3. How two patrons were able to stop the gunman — Police say these patrons saved others from further injury. Police arrived on the scene within three minutes of the first 911 call.
  4. Whether the attack will be prosecuted as a hate crime — District Attorney Michael Allen said the charges against the suspect will likely include "first-degree murder."
Member Station Reports

A witness says one victim ran to a nearby 7-Eleven to try to get help

Posted November 20, 2022 at 1:58 PM EST
Crime tape is set up near Club Q.
Geneva Heffernan
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AP
Crime tape is set up near Club Q.

One victim ran from the scene to a nearby 7-Eleven and collapsed, according to Giovanni Bowden, who was working there at the time.

"One of the victims had gotten shot seven times and ran over here … trying to get some help," he said. "He collapsed. That's why that caution tape is out in the front there.

Others who'd been at the club also came to the store, he said. Some of them, and Bowden's coworker, tried to stabilize the victim by applying pressure to wounds.

➡️ Read more from Colorado Public Radio here

Biden condemns LGBTQ hate crimes and calls for stricter gun laws

Posted November 20, 2022 at 1:36 PM EST
U.S. President Joe Biden, pictured here speaking at a labor event earlier in the week, issued a statement Sunday condemning the attack on Club Q and called for congress to pass greater gun control measures.
Win McNamee
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Getty Images North America
U.S. President Joe Biden, pictured here speaking at a labor event earlier in the week, issued a statement Sunday condemning the attack on Club Q and called for congress to pass greater gun control measures.

President Joe Biden condemned hate violence toward the LGBTQ community and called for stricter gun laws to prevent more mass shootings like the one in Colorado Springs.

Biden said while the gunman's motive has not been confirmed, the U.S. must acknowledge a history of hate attacks directed toward the LGBTQ community, according to a White House press release.

"Gun violence continues to have a devastating and particular impact on LGBTQI+ communities across our nation and threats of violence are increasing," he said. "And tragically, we saw it last night in this devastating attack by a gunman wielding a long rifle at an LGBTQI+ nightclub in Colorado Springs."

Biden also pointed to the mass shooting in Orlando, Fla., that killed 49 people and injured dozens of others at the Pulse nightclub in 2016, making it the deadliest attack on the LGBTQ community in American history.

"We must drive out the inequities that contribute to violence against LGBTQI+ people," he said. "We cannot and must not tolerate hate."

Biden signed the first major gun safety law passed by Congress in nearly 30 years, a month after the mass shooting at an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas that killed 19 children and two adults. The legislation expands background checks on people between the ages of 18 and 21 seeking to buy a gun and provides incentives for states to allow petitions to remove weapons from people deemed a threat.

But he said more must be done.

'We need to enact an assault weapons ban to get weapons of war off America’s streets," he said.

LGBTQ organizations express heartbreak over the shooting

Posted November 20, 2022 at 1:20 PM EST

As individuals take to social media to describe feelings of heartbreak, shock and fatigue after learning of the shooting in Colorado Springs, LGBTQ-rights groups are doing the same, calling for greater community awareness, rights and protections.

In honor of Trans Day of Remembrance, The Human Rights Campaign noted that at least 32 transgender and gender non-confirming people have been killed in acts of violence in 2022 alone.

The identity of the five victims in yesterday's shooting have yet to be released.

Remember that help is available: If you are a young person in crisis or in need of a safe and judgment-free place to process this news, you can contact The Trevor Project's Trevor Lifeline 24/7 at 1-866-488-7386, via chat every day or by texting "START" to 678-678.

Member Station Reports

What to know about Colorado Springs

Posted November 20, 2022 at 1:05 PM EST
Bouquets of flowers and a sign reading "Love Over Hate" were left near Club Q on Sunday morning.
Jason Connolly
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AFP via Getty
Bouquets of flowers and a sign reading "Love Over Hate" were left near Club Q on Sunday morning.

Colorado Springs, the city where the shooting took place, has a conservative reputation.

It has five military bases, and it's a hub for evangelical thought and culture.

It's also a city of nearly 500,000 people — meaning there are different communities who call Colorado Springs home.

At a Sunday morning news conference, the police chief wanted to make it clear the suspect in the shooting is not representative of the city's people, and he called out two patrons who were able to stop the attack.

"We owe them a great debt of thanks."

Lawmakers are calling for more support for the LGBTQ community

Posted November 20, 2022 at 12:53 PM EST

Lawmakers are condemning violence against the LGBTQ community in the wake of the attack on Club Q in Colorado Springs.

Colorado Democrat Jared Polis, who became thefirst openly gay man to be elected governor in 2018, called the shooting "horrific, sickening, and devastating" and ensured that the state of Colorado stands by its LGBTQ community.

"My heart breaks for the family and friends of those lost, injured, and traumatized in this terrible shooting," Polis wrote on Twitter.

Polis said he spoke to Colorado Springs Mayor John Suthers to ensure "every state resource" is available to local law enforcement.

"We are eternally grateful for the brave individuals who blocked the gunman, likely saving lives in the process, and for the first responders who responded swiftly to this horrific shooting," he said.

Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., similarly expressed his devastation upon hearing news of the shooting that killed five people in his state and called for more protection and support of the LGBTQ community.

"I’m thinking of their families and loved ones, and sending strength to those who were injured, the survivors, and Colorado’s LGBTQ community," he wrote on Twitter. "As we seek justice for this unimaginable act, we must do more to protect the LGBTQ community and stand firm against discrimination and hate in every form."

Lawmakers representing other states also took to Twitter to condemn attacks against the LGBTQ community.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., wrote that "hateful acts against LGBTQ+ people cannot and will not be tolerated," while Sen. Raphael Warnock, D-Ga., who is running for re-election in a December runoff, condemned "violence, hatred, or intolerance of any kind."

Orlando, Fla.

OnePULSE Foundation says the violence “must come to an end”

Posted November 20, 2022 at 12:33 PM EST
Flowers for the victims of the Pulse Nightclub shooting lie at the front of the nightclub on June 21, 2016 in Orlando, Florida. The Orlando community continues to mourn the victims of the deadly mass shooting at a gay nightclub.
Gerardo Mora/Getty Images
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Getty Images North America
Flowers for the victims of the Pulse Nightclub shooting lie at the front of the nightclub on June 21, 2016 in Orlando, Florida. The Orlando community continues to mourn the victims of the deadly mass shooting at a gay nightclub.

The Colorado Springs shooting comes a little over six years after a gunman opened fire at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Fla.

On June 12, 2016, 49 people were killed and dozens more were injured at Pulse, a gay nightclub, in what is considered the second deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history.

OnePULSE Foundation, created by the owners of the Pulse nightclub, wrote in a statement, “We are deeply saddened and concerned to hear about the mass shooting at the gay nightclub Club Q.”

They added, “This epidemic of hate and violence must come to an end.”

The group plans to host a gathering and moment of prayer at the Pulse Interim Memorial in Orlando at 5 p.m. local time.

Club Q has been a safe haven for Colorado Springs LGBTQ community, police say

Posted November 20, 2022 at 12:18 PM EST

Club Q has been serving the Colorado Springs area since 2002. The venue includes drag performances, karaoke and dance parties for patrons 18 years and older.

“Club Q is a safe haven for our LGBTQ citizens,” Colorado Springs Police Chief Adrian Vasquez said in a press conference Sunday morning.

“I’m so terribly saddened and heartbroken,” he added.

Colorado Springs Police Department Lt. Pamela Castro said the department was shocked at the attack at Club Q, describing the nightclub as “not a problem” spot.

Club Q announced that the venue will be closed until further notice.

The attack is the latest in a series of shootings targeting the LGBTQ community. In 2016, a gunman killed 49 people at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Fla. It is considered one of the deadliest mass shootings in U.S. history.

The shooting at Club Q came on the eve of Transgender Day of Remembrance

Posted November 20, 2022 at 11:48 AM EST
Protestors for transgender rights hug during a demonstration last week in New York City.
Alex Kent
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Getty Images
Protestors for transgender rights hug during a demonstration last week in New York City.

The gunman targeted the LGBTQ club, Club Q, the night before Transgender Day of Remembrance, which occurs annually on Nov. 20.

The day honors the memory of victims of violence caused by their gender identification and presentation.

The day of remembrance traces its roots back to 1999, when the LGBTQ rights advocate Gwendolyn Ann Smith helped organize a vigil in memory ofRita Hester, a transgender woman who was killed the year before, and Chanelle Pickett, another transgender woman killed in 1995. Both were women of color and last seen alive at a neighborhood club.

"No one I spoke with then knew who Chanelle Pickett was, even though the trial of her murderer, William Palmer, had ended only months before Hester's death," Ann Smith wrote in 2012. "It seemed clear to me then that we were forgetting our past, and were -- to paraphrase George Santayana -- doomed to repeat it."

The vigil began a global movement and tradition to commemorate lives lost to anti-transgender violence.

America has seen at least 601 mass shootings in this year alone

Posted November 20, 2022 at 11:25 AM EST

In 2022 alone, the United States has seen at least 601 mass shootings, creating an average of about 13 shootings a week.

That's according to data from the Gun Violence Archive, which defines a mass shooting as an incident where at least four people are shot or killed, not including the shooter.

Mass shootings have devastated communities in nearly every corner of the nation this year. A racist attack at a Buffalo, N.Y. supermarket killed 10 people and injured three more on May 14. Ten days later, a gunman killed 19 children and two teachersat an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas, making it the deadliest school shooting in the U.S. since Sandy Hook. The attack that killed five people at Club Q in Colorado Springs late Saturday was only the latest mass shooting in the Gun Violence Archive database.

A total list of mass shootings in 2022 can be found here.

The year 2021 saw 690 mass shootings. The previous year had 610. And 2019 had 417.

Nonprofit founded by family members of Sandy Hook victims stands by those affected by Club Q shooting

Posted November 20, 2022 at 11:06 AM EST

Sandy Hook Promise, a nonprofit founded by several family members whose loved ones were killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School 10 years ago, took to social mediato share news of the mass shooting at Club Q in Colorado Springs, Colo.

"At least 5 people are dead and 18 more injured after a mass shooting at an LGBTQ nightclub in Colorado Springs," Sandy Hook Promise wrote. "Our hearts are with the entire community as details of this senseless tragedy continue to unfold. #EndGunViolence"

A gunman shot and killed 26 people, including 20 first graders, at Sandy Hook on Dec. 14, 2012 in Newton, Conn., sparking a nationwide discussion around gun violence and school shootings.

Just In

Police say "heroic" patrons were able to stop the gunman

Posted November 20, 2022 at 10:53 AM EST

Police have identified the suspect in the shooting at Club Q in Colorado Springs as 22-year-old Anderson Lee Aldrich.

Police say the first call came in at 11:57 p.m. MT, the first officer arrived on the scene at 12:00 a.m. MT, and the suspect was taken into custody at 12:02 a.m. MT.

Witnesses said the suspect entered the club and immediately began shooting, but he was confronted by patrons at the club.

"At least two heroic people inside the club confronted and fought with the suspect and were able to stop the suspect from continuing to kill and harm others,” said Colorado Springs Police Chief Adrian Vasquez.

Police say at least two firearms were found, and it appears the shooter used a long rifle in the attack.

Police are still determining whether this is a hate crime.

The number of people killed is still five. The number of injured is 18, not including the suspect. Some victims brought themselves to the hospital, so the number of injured may change. At least two are in “critical care.”

The FBI is on scene, taking part in the investigation.

Colorado's governor called the attack 'horrific, sickening, and devastating'

Posted November 20, 2022 at 10:10 AM EST

In a statement, Colorado Gov. Jared Polis called the attack on Club Q "horrific, sickening, and devastating."

“My heart breaks for the family and friends of those lost, injured, and traumatized in this horrific shooting," Polis said. "I have spoken with Mayor Suthers and made it clear that every state resource is available to local law enforcement in Colorado Springs. We are eternally grateful for the brave individuals who blocked the gunman likely saving lives in the process and for the first responders who responded swiftly to this horrific shooting. Colorado stands with our LGTBQ community and everyone impacted by this tragedy as we mourn together.”

Reaction

The club calls the shooting a 'hate attack'

Posted November 20, 2022 at 9:59 AM EST

Club Q wrote on its Facebook page that it is "devastated by the senseless attack on our community."

"Our prayers and thoughts are with all the victims and their families and friends."

"We thank the quick reactions of heroic customers that subdued the gunman and ended this hate attack."

The shooting happened right before the start of Transgender Day of Remembrance, which is Nov. 20.

Police have not yet shared the suspect's motive.

Police

A news conference is scheduled to take place at 8 a.m. local time

Posted November 20, 2022 at 9:54 AM EST

The Colorado Springs Police Department will have a news conference at 8 a.m. Mountain Time about the shooting.

We'll update as we learn more.

Overnight

At least 5 were killed in the attack

Posted November 20, 2022 at 9:53 AM EST

Five people were killed and at least 18 injured in a shooting at an LGBTQ nightclub late Saturday in Colorado Springs, Colo., authorities said.

Police received a phone call at about 11:57 p.m. to report a shooting at Club Q, Colorado Springs Police Department spokesperson Lt. Pamela Castro told media early Sunday morning.

CPR News reports one suspect is in custody and is being treated at a local hospital.