Country Performances and stories featuring traditions and innovations in American roots and country music.

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William Shatner Manfred Baumann/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Manfred Baumann/Courtesy of the artist

William Shatner on World Cafe

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Natalie Hemby performs for WXPN's Free At Noon Concert. Recorded live for World Cafe. WXPN hide caption

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WXPN

Natalie Hemby on World Cafe

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"Some of the work is deliberately remaining outside of the structure," says musician and advocate Lilli Lewis of the efforts of Black musicians to make it in country and roots music industries. "We want to center different values and it's really difficult to do that from inside." Lewis just released a new album called Americana. David Villalta/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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David Villalta/Courtesy of the artist

New roots: Black musicians and advocates are forging coalitions outside the system

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Rodney Crowell Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Rodney Crowell On World Cafe

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Yola Joseph Ross/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Joseph Ross/Courtesy of the artist

Yola on World Cafe

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Lukas Nelson Alysse Gafkjen/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Alysse Gafkjen/Courtesy of the artist

Lukas Nelson on World Cafe

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Paul Thorn performs on Mountain Stage at the Culture Center in Charleston, W.Va. Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

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Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Paul Thorn On Mountain Stage

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Kacey Musgraves Adreienne Raquel/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Adreienne Raquel/Courtesy of the artist

Kacey Musgraves on World Cafe

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Country singer Mickey Guyton released her latest album, Remember Her Name, on Sept. 24. Kevin Winter/Getty Images for The Recording A hide caption

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Kevin Winter/Getty Images for The Recording A

On Debut Album, Mickey Guyton Remembers Her Name

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"I never made judgments in my songs," Tom T. Hall said. "I had a lot of good characters, a lot of bad characters. But I never bragged on the good guys and I never condemned the losers." Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images
Courtesy of the artist

Kacey Musgraves, 'star-crossed'

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Country artist George Birge heard Erynn Chambers' TikTok satirizing the stereotypical country songs written by men versus women and turned it into a radio hit. Dustin Haney/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Dustin Haney/Courtesy of the artist

How A Joke TikTok About Country Music Stereotypes Hit The Radio

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