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Jazz

Saxophonist, composer and arranger Jimmy Heath. Lonnie Timmons III/Getty Images hide caption

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Lonnie Timmons III/Getty Images

Jazz Saxophone Legend Jimmy Heath Has Died

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Diatom Ribbons, by Kris Davis (center) was selected as the No. 1 jazz album of 2019 in a poll of 140 critics. Davis' album includes contributions from a wide range of musicians, including Terri Lyne Carrington (left) and Val Jeanty (right). Caroline Mardok/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Caroline Mardok/Courtesy of the artist

For her album Diatom Ribbons, pianist Kris Davis assembled a group of musicians who, taken together, represent just about everything happening at the edges of jazz right now. (Pictured, from left to right: Trevor Dunn, Val Jeanty, Terri Lyne Carrington, Davis, Tony Malaby, JD Allen and Esperanza Spalding) Mimi Chakarova/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Mimi Chakarova/Courtesy of the artist

Jazz trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie performs at the Boston Globe Jazz and Blues Festival on Jan. 15, 1966. Bob Daugherty/AP hide caption

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Bob Daugherty/AP

How To Like Jazz, For The Uninitiated

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The SFJAZZ Collective, performing live from the Robert N. Miner Auditorium in San Francisco. Don Dixon/SFJAZZ hide caption

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Don Dixon/SFJAZZ

The SFJAZZ Collective

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Dr. John performs onstage during Pilgrimage Music & Cultural Festival on Sept. 26, 2015 in Franklin, Tenn. Jason Davis/Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Davis/Getty Images

'Jazz Night In America' Remembers Artists We Lost In 2019

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Herbie Tsoaeli Steve Gordon/Musicpics.co.za hide caption

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Steve Gordon/Musicpics.co.za

The South African Songbook: Jazz Musicians Who Stayed During Apartheid

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Wynton Marsalis' Big Band Holidays concert onstage at Jazz at Lincoln Center. Lawrence Sumulong/Courtesy of the Artists hide caption

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Lawrence Sumulong/Courtesy of the Artists

Jazz Night In America: A Holiday Celebration

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(L-R) George Cables, Joshua White, Mark G. Meadows and Rebeca Mauleón. Jati Lindsay/Courtesy of the Kennedy Center hide caption

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Jati Lindsay/Courtesy of the Kennedy Center

A Jazz Piano Christmas 2019

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Evgeny Pobozhiy, winner of the Herbie Hancock International Jazz Guitar Competition, performing at the Kennedy Center on Dec. 3, 2019. Steve Mundinger/Courtesy of the Hancock Institute hide caption

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Steve Mundinger/Courtesy of the Hancock Institute

"If you think of music like Legos," Harry Connick Jr. says, Cole Porter's music "was like the greatest set of Legos, ever. You could build anything because the songs were so structurally sound." Sasha Samsanova/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Sasha Samsanova/Courtesy of the artist

Harry Connick Jr. Celebrates The Music Of Cole Porter On 'True Love'

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Nat King Cole playing piano in the Capitol Records recording studio on May 23, 1945. Capitol Records Photo Archive/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Capitol Records Photo Archive/Courtesy of the artist

'Hittin' The Ramp' Traces Nat King Cole's Early Artistic Development

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Trumpeter and composer Nicholas Payton drew controversy in 2011 with his rejection of the word "jazz." Now, he's reimagining black music with a new symphony. Jennifer Coombes/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Jennifer Coombes/Courtesy of the artist

Nicholas Payton Reimagines Musical Tradition With 'Black American Symphony'

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