More From Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz

Jeremy Monteiro On Piano Jazz

Monteiro grew up watching his father play jazz guitar in Singapore. Now, after recording 20 albums as a leader, the pianist remains a statesman for jazz throughout Southeast Asia.

Jeremy Monteiro On Piano Jazz

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Max Roach performs in Havana, Cuba in 1989. Rafael Perez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Max Roach On Piano Jazz

Roach was one of jazz's legendary drummers — an innovator and co-creator of what became known as bebop. In this program from 1998, Roach relates a few memories of performing with Bird, Monk and Diz.

Max Roach In The Studio

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Anat Fort On Piano Jazz

On this 2007 episode, the Israeli-born pianist, composer and arranger performs original compositions before joining Marian McPartland on standards.

Anat Fort On Piano Jazz

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The Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts Liu Jin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Charlie Watts And Tim Ries On Piano Jazz

Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts teams up with the band's touring saxophonist, Tim Ries, to play through jazz standards and Stones songs.

Jack DeJohnette Sandrine Lee/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Jack DeJohnette On Piano Jazz

One of the most original, inventive and important drummers in recent jazz history, DeJohnette has provided rhythm for the likes of John Coltrane and Miles Davis.

Jack DeJohnette On Piano Jazz

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Ray Charles and Marian McPartland. Courtesy of Vanguard hide caption

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Ray Charles On Piano Jazz

Ray Charles was one of those rare musicians whose musical style blended many genres, drawing on jazz, rhythm and blues, gospel, country, and rock 'n' roll, to create a unique and soulful sound. Hear Charles play "Oh What a Beautiful Morning" before joining McPartland for "The Man I Love."