Deepa Shivaram Deepa Shivaram is a White House Correspondent at NPR.
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Deepa Shivaram

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Deepa Shivaram headshot
Courtesy of Deepa Shivaram

Deepa Shivaram

White House Correspondent, Washington Desk

Deepa Shivaram is a White House Correspondent at NPR.

She joined NPR as a digital reporter in 2021, covering domestic and international breaking news, and reported on stories about climate change, former New York Governor Andrew Cuomo's resignation, the Afghan refugee crisis, the Tokyo Olympic games and Asian American representation on screen.

She joined the Washington Desk in April 2022, where she's covered the midterm elections, the Biden administration and issues like Title 42 and the leaked Supreme Court opinion on Roe v. Wade, before moving to the White House beat.

Prior to NPR, Shivaram was a political reporter and campaign embed at NBC News where she followed Kamala Harris and Elizabeth Warren during the 2020 primary elections, and covered Harris again when she was tapped as Joe Biden's vice presidential nominee. She also previously worked as an associate producer with NBC's Sunday show, Meet the Press.

Story Archive

Friday

Family members of plaintiffs in the historic Brown v. Board of Education met with President Biden to mark the 70th anniversary of the Supreme Court decision. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Wednesday

Friday

President Biden is welcomed by Rep. Jim Clyburn, D-S.C. on Jan. 27, 2024, as he campaigned ahead of the South Carolina Democratic primary. Kent Nishimura/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kent Nishimura/AFP via Getty Images

Thursday

Biden denounced 'chaos' when speaking on student protests

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Wednesday

The Biden administration advances its aim to reclassify marijuana

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Tuesday

Thursday

Monday

President Biden tours a Samsung plant in Pyeongtaek, South Korea with South Korean President Yoon Suk-youl on May 20, 2022. The company is building a massive new campus in Texas. Kim Min-Hee/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kim Min-Hee/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Friday

Thursday

People look at guns and ammunition at the Great American Outdoor Show on Feb. 9 in Harrisburg, Penn. Former President Donald Trump spoke at the event. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Wednesday

President Biden and Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida stand together during a state visit ceremony at the White House. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Friday

U.S. Army soldiers wear boots as they march in formation during a change of command ceremony, Monday, April 3, 2017, at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Vice President Harris watches as President Biden signs an executive order on artificial intelligence on Oct. 30. On Thursday, the Biden administration issued new rules on how government agencies can implement AI. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

The White House issued new rules on how government can use AI. Here's what they do

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Thursday

Biden administration announces new guidance for how federal agencies can use AI

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Boxes of the drug mifepristone sit on a shelf at the West Alabama Women's Center in Tuscaloosa, Ala., on March 16, 2022. Allen G. Breed/AP hide caption

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Allen G. Breed/AP

Wednesday

This combination photo shows President Joe Biden, left, on March 8, 2024, in Wallingford, Pa., and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Tel Aviv, Israel, Oct. 28, 2023. AP hide caption

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AP

Bibi & Biden: Bromance Or Bust?

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Tuesday

Former President Donald Trump awaits the start of a pre-trial hearing with his defense team at Manhattan criminal, Monday, March 25, 2024, in New York. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

Monday

A man wearing a hat with patches supportive of Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump sits at a Buckeye Values PAC rally awaiting remarks from Trump on Saturday, March 16, 2024, in Vandalia, Ohio. Meg Kinnard/AP hide caption

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Meg Kinnard/AP

Saturday

Vice President Kamala Harris on Saturday spoke at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., about gun safety measures after meeting with families whose loved ones were killed during the 2018 shooting at the school. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Thursday

Activists and students protest in front of the Supreme Court during a rally for student debt cancellation in Washington, D.C., in February 2023. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Wednesday

Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger shows President Biden a semiconductor wafer during a tour at the company's Ocotillo Campus in Chandler, Ariz. on March 20. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Biden is giving Intel $8.5 billion for big semiconductor projects in 4 states

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Wednesday

Vice President Harris speaks to reporters after her visit to a Planned Parenthood clinic in Saint Paul, Minn. on March 14. Stephen Maturen/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Maturen/AFP via Getty Images

Harris visited an abortion clinic, a first for any president or vice president

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Monday

The memorial at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., on Feb. 14, 2023. Five years earlier, 14 students and 3 staff members were killed in a mass shooting at the school. Saul Martinez/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Martinez/Getty Images

Saturday

Biden hits the campaign trail after delivering the State of the Union address

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