David Gura
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David Gura

Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff speaks onstage during the TechCrunch Disrupt San Francisco event in San Francisco on Oct. 3, 2019. Benioff is a proponent of stakeholder capitalism, the belief that companies must look out for the broader good. Steve Jennings/Getty Images for TechCrunch hide caption

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Steve Jennings/Getty Images for TechCrunch

Why the Salesforce CEO wants to redefine capitalism by pushing for social change

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Marc Benioff shows that CEOs can go beyond profit and champion for social justice

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More than 130 countries on Friday agreed to set a global minimum corporate tax rate, a proposal spearheaded by U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, seen here at a House Oversight Committee hearing on Sept. 30. Al Drago/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/AFP via Getty Images

Over 130 countries clinch a deal that could radically reshape how companies are taxed

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What the Pandora Papers reveal about how the rich shelter their assets

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Wall Streeters are not only back at their offices, but they are also heading to the airports again, even as many companies continue to keep their workers at home. Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images

Only 'wimps' phone it in: Why Wall Street bankers are hitting the road again

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China Makes Cryptocurrency Illegal

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Big Sell-Off In Chinese Real Estate Stocks Caused Worldwide Market Dip

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A sign for the China Evergrande Centre, the Hong Kong home for China Evergrande Group, is shown last week. Fears of a debt default at the property developer sparked a global stock market sell-off on Monday. Peter Parks/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Parks/AFP via Getty Images

A Chinese Real Estate Company Is Walloping Your Stocks. Here's Why

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People walk near the sight of Ground Zero and the One World Trade Center on Aug. 30. The Wall Street neighborhood changed drastically after the 9/11 attacks as banks moved out of what had long been their home. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

How 9/11 Changed Wall Street

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Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell appears before the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee in July. The Fed is facing a key decision of when to start withdrawing some of the stimulus it has provided to markets during the pandemic. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

It's Called The Bond Taper. Yes, It's Geeky. But This Is Why You Should Know About It

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The Federal Reserve Changes Strategy As The Economy Begins To Recover

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This illustration photograph taken on July 19 in Istanbul shows a physical banknote and coin imitations of the Bitcoin cryptocurrency. Regulators such as Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Gary Gensler are promising tougher action for cryptocurrencies. Ozan Kose/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ozan Kose/AFP via Getty Images

Tougher Rules Are Coming For Bitcoin And Other Cryptocurrencies. Here's What To Know

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Cryptocurrencies May Be Reined In Soon — Here's What Regulators Want To Change

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Tashrima Hossain, who used to work in Wall Street but quit to join Facebook, is part of a growing number of young people who are no longer attracted by the allure of Wall Street despite the rising salaries. She poses for a portrait at Alamo Square in San Francisco, Calif. on Wednesday, August 11, 2021. Preston Gannaway for NPR hide caption

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Preston Gannaway for NPR

Wall Street Is Paying Over $100,000 To Junior Bankers. For Many, That's Not Enough

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