David Gura David Gura is a correspondent on NPR's business desk.
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David Gura

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David Gura headshot
Courtesy of David Gura

David Gura

Correspondent, Business Desk

Based in New York, David Gura is a correspondent on NPR's business desk. His stories are broadcast on NPR's newsmagazines, All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Weekend Edition, and he regularly guest hosts 1A, a co-production of NPR and WAMU.

Previously, Gura was a correspondent for NBC News and an anchor for MSNBC. His reporting aired on NBC Nightly News and TODAY, and MSNBC's dayside and primetime programs, including The 11th Hour, Deadline: White House and MTP Daily.

Gura travels widely across the United States and around the world. In recent months, his reporting has centered on the COVID-19 pandemic and its economic fallout. In Texas, he covered a surge in cases that strained Houston's hospitals. On the eve of an eviction crisis in Oklahoma, Gura profiled people who had waited months for jobless benefits.

He has anchored special coverage, often from the field. During Hurricane Dorian, he broadcasted live from the Outer Banks in his home state of North Carolina. Gura reported from Virginia Beach, Virginia, after a mass shooting at the city's municipal complex, and from El Paso, Texas, after an attack on shoppers at a Walmart Supercenter. After a gunman targeted the Tree of Life – Or L'Simcha Congregation, Gura anchored MSNBC's coverage from Pittsburgh.

For almost two years, he hosted Up with David Gura on MSNBC, a lively roundtable that aired on Saturday and Sunday mornings, featuring a motley group of guests, including lawmakers, reporters, columnists, strategists, actors and comedians. During the 2020 primary, Gura interviewed many of the Democratic presidential candidates, and he took the show on the road to the Texas Tribune Festival.

Before he joined NBC News and MSNBC, Gura was a correspondent for Bloomberg Television and Bloomberg Radio, and a contributor to Bloomberg Businessweek. He co-anchored Bloomberg Surveillance, the network's flagship morning program, and after the 2016 election, he launched Bloomberg Markets: Balance of Power, which focused on the intersection of politics and policy.

Previously, Gura was a senior reporter for Marketplace, the public radio business and economics program, and its primary back-up host. From the organization's Washington bureau, he covered budget battles, showdowns and shutdowns and the implementation of financial reform, and he also spent a lot of time on the road, looking at how legislation and regulations affect Americans beyond the Beltway.

Gura's writing has appeared in The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Columbia Journalism Review and the Virginia Quarterly Review. He has been recognized by the National Press Foundation, the National Constitution Center and the French-American Foundation, and he is a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

An alumnus of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, Gura received his bachelor's degree in history and American studies, with honors, from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. He also studied political science in La Paz, Bolivia, at the Universidad Mayor de San Andrés and the Universidad Católica Boliviana.

Story Archive

The BlockFi website on a laptop computer arranged in the Brooklyn borough of New York, US, on Nov. 17. BlockFi filed for bankruptcy on Nov 28, 2022. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The fallout from FTX's collapse is being felt across the crypto industry

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As FTX collapsed in early November, Samuel Bankman-Fried handed over control the cryptocurrency exchange he founded to John J. Ray III, a corporate turnaround specialist. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

5 major revelations about the collapse of crypto giant FTX

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FTX's new CEO reveals just how big a mess he's dealing with

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Sam Bankman-Fried, then FTX's CEO, appeared before the House Financial Services Committee in December 2021. Its chairwoman, Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA), says she expects him to testify again soon. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Wringing its hands over FTX's collapse, Washington hopes to prevent more crypto pain

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After crypto exchange FTX collapsed, Washington policymakers debate how to respond

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Sam Bankman-Fried, the now-former CEO of FTX, encouraged the cryptocurrency exchange's customers to buy its own cryptocurrency, called the FTX Token. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Cryptocurrency exchange FTX files for bankruptcy in another blow to the industry

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Cryptocurrency exchange FTX files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy

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Cryptocurrency exchange FTX files for bankruptcy

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Harvard University has had the largest academic endowment since 1986. Maddie Meyer/Getty Images hide caption

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As Harvard's endowment abandons fossil fuels, oil-rich University of Texas catches up

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How royalties from the extraction of oil and gas are helping a Texas university

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Attendees watch David Solomon, chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs & Co., on a screen as he speaks during a panel session at the Future Investment Initiative (FII) conference in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2022. Tasneem Alsultan/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Wall Street eager to strike deals with Saudi Arabia, despite political concerns

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