Doualy Xaykaothao Doualy Xaykaothao is a newscaster and reporter for NPR.
Doualy Xaykaothao at NPR West in Culver City, California, September 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Doualy Xaykaothao

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Doualy Xaykaothao at NPR West in Culver City, California, September 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Doualy Xaykaothao

Newscaster and Reporter

Doualy Xaykaothao is a newscaster and reporter for NPR.

She is responsible for writing, producing and delivering national newscasts. She also reports on breaking news stories for NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

Xaykaothao first joined NPR in 1999 as a production assistant for Morning Edition, and has since worked as a producer, editor, director and reporter for NPR's award-winning newsmagazines. She's also worked at Minnesota Public Radio, and at NPR Member Stations: KERA, KPCC and KCRW.

For nearly a decade, Xaykaothao was also a correspondent based in Seoul and Bangkok, chasing breaking news in North and Southeast Asia for NPR. In Thailand, she covered the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami. In Nepal, as a 2006 International Reporting Project Fellow, she reported on the effects of war on children and women. In South Korea, she reported on rising tensions between the two Koreas, including North Korea's attack on the South Korean island of Yeonpyeong. In 2011, she was the first NPR reporter to witness and cover the aftermath of the Tōhoku earthquake and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear meltdowns.

Xaykaothao is a multi-platform journalist whose work has won Edward R. Murrow and Peabody Awards. She earned her Bachelor of Arts from SUNY Empire, and she has a Master of Arts (Business and Economics concentration) from Columbia University.

For those curious, Doualy means Shadow-of-the-Moon in her native Hmong language. She is a member of an indigenous hill tribe from Asia, born in Laos, but raised in France and the United States.

Story Archive

Clyde Bellecourt, co-founder or the American Indian Movement, is shown speaking in 2018 at Minneapolis City Hall. Bellecourt, a leader in the Native American struggle for civil rights and a founder of the American Indian Movement died at 85 on Tuesday night from cancer. Amy Forliti/AP hide caption

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Amy Forliti/AP

Clockwise from top left: We Are Lady Parts, City of Ghosts, Bachelorette (Season 18), The Wonder Years, and Reservation Dogs. NPR hide caption

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NPR

What We Watched in 2021

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Little, Brown and Company

Crowds gather around the lead tank of the 1st Battalion 400th Infantry task force, and 103rd Cactus Division, after soldiers entered without resistance in Innsbruck, Austria, on May 19, 1945. Jim Pringle/AP hide caption

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Jim Pringle/AP

World War II Vets Honor Their Own In Cactus Division

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Trinity Groves, a sprawling food incubator in West Dallas, has attracted diverse chefs and huge crowds. Rebecca Combs/Courtesy of Trinity Groves hide caption

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Rebecca Combs/Courtesy of Trinity Groves

Cuisine And Culture Transform A Dallas Neighborhood

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National Novel Writing Month — or NaNoWriMo — ends November 30th, and writers around the world are scrambling to meet the 50,000 word goal. iStockphoto hide caption

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John Chong (from left), Sally Kang, Joe Chun, Alex Hwang, Jennifer Rim and Daniel Chae of Run River North. Doualy Xaykaothao hide caption

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Doualy Xaykaothao

Run River North Stays The Course — And Finds Success

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Koreans In U.S. Have Mixed Reaction To North's Threats

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South Korean girl group Girls' Generation onstage during the Seoul Music Awards in January. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Everybody Wants To Be A K-Pop Star

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With a new leader in North Korea, the U.S. and South Korea are watching for clues of his policies. But so far tensions have not eased along the demilitarized zone. Here, two North Korean soldiers look across at a South Korean soldier on Dec. 2. Lee Jae-Won/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Lee Jae-Won/Reuters/Landov