Doualy Xaykaothao Doualy Xaykaothao is a newscaster for NPR, based in Culver City.
Doualy Xaykaothao at NPR West in Culver City, California, September 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Doualy Xaykaothao

Allison Shelley/NPR
Doualy Xaykaothao at NPR West in Culver City, California, September 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Doualy Xaykaothao

Newscaster

Doualy Xaykaothao is a newscaster for NPR, based in Culver City. She returned to NPR for this role in 2018, in which she is responsible for writing, producing, and delivering national newscasts.

Before she came to NPR, Xaykaothao was a correspondent at Minnesota Public Radio, where she covered race, culture, and immigration. She also served as a senior reporter at KERA, NPR's Member station in Dallas.

Xaykaothao first joined NPR in 1999 as a production assistant for Morning Edition, and since worked as an NPR producer, editor, director, and reporter for NPR's award-winning programs. For many years, Xaykaothao was also based in Seoul and Bangkok, chasing breaking news in North and Southeast Asia. In Thailand, she covered the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami. In South Korea, she reported on rising tensions between the two Koreas, including Pyongyang's attack on the South Korean island of Yeonpyeong. And in 2011, she was the first NPR reporter to reach northern Japan to cover the Tōhoku earthquake and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear meltdowns.

Xaykaothao is a multi-platform journalist whose work has won Edward R. Murrow and Peabody Awards. She is a member of the ethnic Hmong hill tribe, born in Laos, but raised in France and the United States. She attended college in upstate New York, where she specialized in television, radio, political science, and ethnic studies.

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Story Archive

Crowds gather around the lead tank of the 1st Battalion 400th Infantry task force, and 103rd Cactus Division, after soldiers entered without resistance in Innsbruck, Austria, on May 19, 1945. Jim Pringle/AP hide caption

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Jim Pringle/AP

World War II Vets Honor Their Own In Cactus Division

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Trinity Groves, a sprawling food incubator in West Dallas, has attracted diverse chefs and huge crowds. Rebecca Combs/Courtesy of Trinity Groves hide caption

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Cuisine And Culture Transform A Dallas Neighborhood

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National Novel Writing Month — or NaNoWriMo — ends November 30th, and writers around the world are scrambling to meet the 50,000 word goal. iStockphoto hide caption

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John Chong (from left), Sally Kang, Joe Chun, Alex Hwang, Jennifer Rim and Daniel Chae of Run River North. Doualy Xaykaothao hide caption

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Doualy Xaykaothao

Run River North Stays The Course — And Finds Success

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Koreans In U.S. Have Mixed Reaction To North's Threats

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Cambodian Americans Celebrate New Year, But Honor Grim History

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Sun Myung Moon, Unification Church Founder, Dies

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Diversity Helps South Korean District Win Locals Back

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South Korean girl group Girls' Generation onstage during the Seoul Music Awards in January. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Everybody Wants To Be A K-Pop Star

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With a new leader in North Korea, the U.S. and South Korea are watching for clues of his policies. But so far tensions have not eased along the demilitarized zone. Here, two North Korean soldiers look across at a South Korean soldier on Dec. 2. Lee Jae-Won/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Along Korea's DMZ, No Sign That Tensions Are Easing

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Boats Ashore, Tsunami Scars Japanese Fishing Town

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Students at Tohoku Chosen, an elementary and junior high school for North Koreans in Sendai City, now take dance classes in the school's cafeteria because their main building was destroyed when the earthquake struck northeast Japan last March. Doualy Xaykaothao/NPR hide caption

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For Kids In Japan, Adjusting To A Changed World

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A woman picks carrots on her farm as she explains her fears that no one will buy them since the radiation fallout in March 2011 in Fukushima, Japan. A year later, challenges persist for farmers in the region. Wally Santana/AP hide caption

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With Radiation, Doubt Grows In Fukushima Farms

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N. Korean Kaesong Workers Mourn Kim Jong Il

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