Janaya Williams
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Janaya Williams

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Anthony Hamilton performs on Sept. 16 in New York City. Love Is The New Black is his first full length album in five years. Theo Wargo/Getty Images hide caption

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Theo Wargo/Getty Images

Anthony Hamilton On Being Vulnerable And His New Album 'Love Is The New Black'

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Forest Whitaker plays Jeronicus Jangle, the eccentric toy maker in David E. Talbert's new holiday musical on Netflix, Jingle Jangle: A Christmas Journey. Netflix hide caption

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Netflix

'Jingle Jangle' Director David E. Talbert Calls Film 'A Love Letter To My Childhood'

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Ted Hearne's latest work, a theatrical production reckoning with gentrification and privilege, was commissioned by the LA Philharmonic and was supposed to premiere on the West Coast in late March. Instead, Place was released as an album. Jen Rosenstein/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Jen Rosenstein/Courtesy of the artist

Ted Hearne On Exploring Gentrification Through The Music Of 'Place'

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After a drawn out fight with her record label, Good To Know is JoJo's first new album since 2016. "I found my power. And that feels so exhilarating and intoxicating," she says. Dennis Leupold/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Dennis Leupold/Courtesy of the artist

'Good To Know': JoJo On Coming Out Of Hardship With First New Album Since 2016

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Ranky Tanky combine traditional Gullah music — which originated with the descendants of formerly enslaved Africans who made lived in South Carolina's low country — with contemporary gospel and R&B. Sully Sullivan/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Sully Sullivan/Courtesy of the artist

Ranky Tanky On Celebrating South Carolina's Gullah Traditions

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José Feliciano performs in the late 1960s. RCA Records/Getty Images hide caption

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RCA Records/Getty Images

The Story Of José Feliciano's World Series Guitar

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"I just feel like that kind of just followed me all throughout my life. I've always kind of been slept on a bit," Ari Lennox says. Laura Beltran Villamizar/NPR hide caption

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Laura Beltran Villamizar/NPR

Ari Lennox Has Always Felt Slept On. That's What Motivates Her.

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The Algebra Mothers were cult favorites in Detroit's rebellious punk rock scene in the 1970s. The band is now enjoying a resurgence, thanks in part to help from Jack White's label — Third Man Records in Detroit. Christopher Morgan/Courtesy of the Algebra Mothers hide caption

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Christopher Morgan/Courtesy of the Algebra Mothers

Punk Band Algebra Mothers Enjoys A Resurgence, With A Little Help From Jack White

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"I think we've been through everything you could possibly get thrown at you in a band," Snow Patrol's Gary Lightbody says. Simon Lipman/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Simon Lipman/Courtesy of the artist

After 25 Years, Snow Patrol Gets More Honest Than Ever

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"The Burial Of Kojo" takes place in Ghana, using a cast and crew made up almost entirely of locals. Above, Cynthia Dakwa, who plays the role of "Esi," and Joseph Otsiman, who plays "Kojo." Ofoe Amegavie/Ofoe Amegavie hide caption

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Ofoe Amegavie/Ofoe Amegavie

Fantasy Collides With African Culture In Blitz The Ambassador's 'Burial Of Kojo'

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King Zulu waves to the crowds from his float on Mardi Gras day on Feb. 24, 2009 in New Orleans. The Zulu Social Aid & Pleasure Club is facing criticism for its tradition of wearing black face makeup during Mardi Gras. Chris Graythen/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Graythen/Getty Images

In New Orleans, The Fight Over Blackface Renews Scrutiny Of A Mardi Gras Tradition

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Desus Nice, left, and The Kid Mero attend the FYC Event for VICELAND's Desus & Mero at the Saban Media Center on April 20, 2018 in North Hollywood, Calif. The duo has launched a new program on Showtime. Charley Gallay/Getty Images for VICELAND hide caption

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Charley Gallay/Getty Images for VICELAND

From The Bronx To Cable Stardom, Desus And Mero Are Remaking Late-Night

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Comedian Amanda Seales attends HBO's "I Be Knowin'" screening at The Roxy Hotel Cinema on Jan. 23, 2019 in New York City. Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images for HBO hide caption

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Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images for HBO

'Insecure' Star Amanda Seales Takes The Stand-Up Stage In HBO's 'I Be Knowin"

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In 'Lady Lady,' Masego Puts 'Trap House Jazz' On Display

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