Nathan Pugh
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Nathan Pugh

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Supporters of former U.S. President Donald Trump gathering outside the Capitol building in Washington D.C., United States on January 06, 2021. Pro-Trump rioters stormed the U.S. Capitol as lawmakers were set to sign off President-elect Joe Biden's electoral victory in what was supposed to be a routine process headed to Inauguration Day. Anadolu Agency/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Revisiting the January 6 insurrection, one year later

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U.S. President Joe Biden at the White House on December 01, 2021 in Washington, DC. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

What has Biden accomplished (or not) in 2021?

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In August of 2021, more than 1,000 janitors with the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) rallied and marched in Los Angeles, California ahead of their as their contracts expiring. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Was 2021 labor's year? Plus, 'Like a Virgin'

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Many banned books lists include Raina Telgemeier's Drama, Brendan Kiely and Jason Reynolds's All American Boys, Alison Bechdel's Fun Home, Benjamin Alire Sáenz's Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe, Ruby Bridge's This is Your Time, and Toni Morrison's Beloved. Estefania Mitre/NPR/NPR hide caption

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Estefania Mitre/NPR/NPR

What people miss in the conversation about banned books

Guest host Ayesha Rascoe is joined by NPR senior editor Barrie Hardymon and Traci Thomas, host of The Stacks podcast, to talk about banned books. They talk about why it's important for kids to discover books freely, even if that means starting a hard conversation with them. They also discuss their favorite — and least favorite — books that often show up on banned book lists.

What people miss in the conversation about banned books

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Buy now, pay later and online returns are just a couple of the hidden costs of holiday shopping. the_burtons/Getty Images hide caption

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the_burtons/Getty Images

The hidden costs of holiday consumerism

A lot of consumers are worried about supply chain delays this holiday season — but there are also other issues to watch out for when shopping. Guest host Ayesha Rascoe talks about the hidden costs of holiday consumption with The Atlantic staff writer Amanda Mull and The Washington Post retail reporter Abha Bhattarai. They discuss the potential downfalls of buy now, pay later services and where online shopping returns really go. Then, they play a game of Who Said That?

The hidden costs of holiday consumerism

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Rax King, author of Tacky: Love Letters to the Worst Culture We Have to Offer. Nikki Austin-Garlington/Nikki Austin-Garlington / Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group hide caption

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Nikki Austin-Garlington/Nikki Austin-Garlington / Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group

Airplanes at gates and Control Tower at LAX; air travel has become increasingly difficult before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Michael H/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael H/Getty Images

Why flying feels so hard; Plus, 'Queer Love in Color'

Now that more people are getting comfortable flying again, it's about time to remind ourselves that, oh yes, flying was sometimes terrible in the Before Times, too! And in 2021, that's still the case — if not more so — with cascading cancellations, staffing and plane shortages, and outbursts from passengers. Sam chats with Natalie Compton, travel reporter at The Washington Post, about the state of the airline industry heading into the holiday travel season... and how to get through it. Plus, author Jamal Jordan discusses his book 'Queer Love in Color,' and what it means to photograph and document queer intimacy. They're also joined by TV producer Hassan Williams for a game of Who Said That?

Why flying feels so hard; Plus, 'Queer Love in Color'

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A view of the front portico of the United States Supreme Court building in Washington, DC, where the Supreme Court will rule on a new Texas law regarding abortion. Phil Roeder/Getty Images hide caption

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Phil Roeder/Getty Images

New threats to Roe v. Wade; Plus, Jo Firestone's 'Good Timing'

Sam talks to Slate staff writer Mark Joseph Stern about the Supreme Court hearing challenges to the Texas abortion law and what it all means for Roe v. Wade. Plus, comedian Jo Firestone and her student Nicki Cochrane talk about their new comedy special, Good Timing with Jo Firestone. They also play Who Said That?

New threats to Roe v. Wade; Plus, Jo Firestone's 'Good Timing'

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Massive icebergs from Jakobshavn Glacier melting in Disko Bay on sunny summer evening, Ilulissat, Greenland. Paul Souders/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Souders/Getty Images

Should I have kids? Move? Recycle? Your climate questions answered

Ahead of the U.N. climate talks in Glasgow this weekend, Sam chats with climate experts Ayana Elizabeth Johnson, marine biologist and writer, and Kendra Pierre-Louis, senior climate reporter with the podcast 'How to Save a Planet.' Together, they answer listener questions about everything from how to talk to your kids about global warming... to how to deal with all of this existential dread.

Should I have kids? Move? Recycle? Your climate questions answered

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The cover for the 1983 album She's So Unusual by Cyndi Lauper, which featured singles like "Girls Just Want to Have Fun" and "All Through the Night." hide caption

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Presenting 'Switched On Pop': the Cyndi Lauper conspiracy

In this special bonus episode, Sam joins Switched On Pop co-host Charlie Harding to talk Cyndi Lauper. Many fall for "Girls Just Want To Have Fun," but Sam's favorite song is the slow burner "All Through The Night," save for one moment: the synthesizer solo. For Sam, this solo never fit in. Charlie investigates the source of Sam's musical malady and uncovers how the '80s got its groove. Hear Sam on another episode of Switched On Pop making the case for why Labrinth's "Sexy MF" should be a modern classic here.

Presenting 'Switched On Pop': the Cyndi Lauper conspiracy

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Author of Hip Hop (And Other Things) Shea Serrano. Larami Serrano/Grand Central Publishing hide caption

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Larami Serrano/Grand Central Publishing

Shea Serrano answers existential questions about rap in 'Hip Hop (And Other Things)'

Author and host of the No Skips podcast Shea Serrano gets obsessive about things — movies, basketball, and now, rap. In Hip Hop (And Other Things), he dives into Cardi B's explosive 2018, the early days of Missy Elliott's career, and the 1995 Source Awards, which he says remains — to this day — one of the biggest nights in rap history.

Shea Serrano answers existential questions about rap in 'Hip Hop (And Other Things)'

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Actor Brian Cox as the wealthy patriarch Logan Roy in the HBO show Succession, whose third season premiered on Oct. 17, 2021. Graeme Hunter/Graeme Hunter hide caption

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Graeme Hunter/Graeme Hunter

Why can't Democrats pass legislation? Plus, 'Succession'

Sam chats with NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson about why dysfunction in the Democratic Party is putting the big "Build Back Better" spending bill in Congressional limbo. Plus, The New Yorker staff writer Doreen St. Felix on Succession, representations of class on TV, and why the plethora of shows about white people being terrible (Succession, The White Lotus, The Undoing, Nine Perfect Strangers, Hacks ... you get the idea) are so addictive. Then, they are joined by The New York Times metro reporter Jazmine Hughes for a game of Who Said That?

Why can't Democrats pass legislation? Plus, 'Succession'

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Comedian Nicole Byer performs onstage. Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for Turner hide caption

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Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for Turner

Nicole Byer's '#VeryFat #VeryBrave' guide to bikini confidence

Sam revisits his 2020 conversation with comedian and Nailed It! host Nicole Byer on her coffee table book: #VeryFat #VeryBrave: The Fat Girl's Guide to Being #Brave and Not a Dejected, Melancholy, Down-in-the-Dumps Weeping Fat Girl in a Bikini. They talk about home goods, drunken bravery, and learning to love yourself.

Nicole Byer's '#VeryFat #VeryBrave' guide to bikini confidence

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DeAnne Stidham and Mark Stidham, founders of multi-level marketing scheme LuLaRoe, from the documentary Lularich. Courtesy of Amazon Prime Video hide caption

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Courtesy of Amazon Prime Video

'LuLaRich' reveals how MLMs mirror the American economy

Sam interviews women's work and economic justice writer Meg Conley about the documentary series LuLaRich and how vulnerable people still get sucked into multi-level marketing schemes because their shape mirrors the American economy. Then, Harvard Ph.D. candidate and Mormon Studies Fellow at the University of Utah Janan Graham-Russell joins for a game of Who Said That?

'LuLaRich' reveals how MLMs mirror the American economy

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